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Poetry during World War I

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This collection of books of poetry published during the years of World War I are from the John MacKay Shaw Childhood in Poetry collection. They were selected from a bibliography that covers 360 poetry books and young adult magazines produced in Great Britain and North America during the Great War and collected by Shaw for inclusion in his larger poetry collection.

As the bibliography notes, Dr. Shaw’s tastes in poetry were “formed when Kipling and Hardy were very much in fashion,” so many of the authors included here are not well known to today’s readers but share a unique look into the first World War and those who experienced it, whether on the Western Front or the home front.

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Afterglow
Afterglow
by James Fenimore Cooper, Jr., Poems reprinted in part from the Yale literary magazine.
Britain to America: a war poem
Britain to America: a war poem
autographed by the author., "To the alumni of Beloit College, U.S.A., and the class of eighteen-sixty-two"--Dedication page (p. [3])
Ditties from a ditty bag : : and War-time memories
Ditties from a ditty bag : : and War-time memories
Author's autograph presentation copy.
England's boys
England's boys
From Shaw Bibliography: The title went through two editions within one year. Trench warfare being what it was in the Great War, the airmen became the avatar of knighthood, as is indicated by Miss Renshaw's "Air Men." (But cf. above, p. 13, entry 180).
Fairyland in 1918, and other poems
Fairyland in 1918, and other poems
"This edition consists of 500 copies.", Signed by author.
First poems
First poems
Copy has bookplate: Ex libris Walter De la Mare., From Shaw Bibliography: Plowman (1883-1941) served on the Western Front and wrote a bitter book about the war. "First Poems" offers a useful contrast with the consequences of experience on the Western Front.
Fleeting vision, and other poems
Fleeting vision, and other poems
by T.H. Chetwynd., Signed by author.
Hit by the war
Hit by the war
Author signed presentation copy., Summary: "But it's riling to a chap and dreadful humbling / To 'ave a lady in a tram car, rise and stand / When all a bloke has got, is fingers orf 'is 'and!" ("Tommy Grumbles"); "I appreciate your grumble, Tommy! / Yet tell us what to do! / We want to do you honour / (Who are maimed by 'fighting through'!)" ("A 'Ministering Angel' Replies")
In war and peace: songs of a Scotswoman
In war and peace: songs of a Scotswoman
by Mary H.J. Henderson ; foreword by John Oxenham.
Memorial poems
Memorial poems
Inscribed by the author.
New Joan
New Joan
From Shaw Bibliography: "These are chiefly songs of women's work, but there is a Christmas song for soldiers."
Our glorious heritage
Our glorious heritage
compiled by Charles Seddon Evans ; introduction by the very Reverend H.C. Beeching., Summary: Introduction: "War, therefore, supplies two opportunities to the poet: he can articulate voice to the love of country and the love of freedom and any other special idea that animates either combatant, such as respect for a nation's pledged word or the protection of the weak against the strong; and he can also celebrate the heroic exploits of armies and individuals which every war calls forth.", From Shaw Bibliography: Introduction in Description. The German invasion of Belgium in the first week of the war is cited by English writers, historians, and politicians as the precipitating cause of England's entry into the war, and would be used thereafter to justify the moral authority of the Entente. Even Bertrand Russell would speak of the "wrong" inflicted on Belgium. (But cf. Robert Graves, "Good-bye to All That," rev. ed. [Garden City: Doubleday, 1957], Chapter XVII, esp. 182ff.)
Petition to the Deil: and other war verses
Petition to the Deil: and other war verses
Copy donated by the author.
Poems
Poems
1st ed. Keynes, Brooke, 5., Bookplate of Jessie Stillman Taylor., From the library of B. George Ulizio., From the Shaw bibliography: This first volume of poetry by the young Brooke (1887-1915) was praised in review by Edward Thomas. The undulations of Brooke's literary reputation reflect well the changes in taste and ideology of English and American poetry in this century. Right after the war, Graves pointedly excluded Brooke from his list of three best poets to have fallen on the English side of the war. In 1917 Brooke served for the dedicatory poem of MacDonald and Ford's "Crown of Amaranth," offered for the poets who had fallen during the war. And in 1965 I.M. Parson, in "Men Who March Away," said that the "1914" sonnets "suffer from crippling shallowness of feeling."
Poems and songs of patriotism and war
Poems and songs of patriotism and war
edited by Charles L. Dana., From Shaw Bibliography: With the American declaration of war in the first week of April 1917 the rift in American poetry between the avant garde and the traditionalists widened. As in England, this rift also betrayed political differences.
Poems of Robert W. Sterling
Poems of Robert W. Sterling
Author's photo pasted in back of book.
Sough o' war
Sough o' war
Reprinted in part from various periodicals.
Swollen-headed William
Swollen-headed William
text adapted by E. V. Lucas ; drawings adapted by Geo. Morrow., Parody on Struwwelpeter by Heinrich Hoffmann-Donner., From Shaw Bibliography: English propaganda assumes literacy in its audience. Here English critic and biographer E.V. Lucas (1868-1938) offers a political parody of Heinrich Hoffman's "Struwwelpeter." Methuen also published patriotic speeches and Kipling's Great War writings.

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