You are here

University Libraries

Permalink: https://diginole.lib.fsu.edu/islandora/object/fsu:university_libraries
Collection banner image

Pages

"FSU Lives" Digitization Project
"FSU Lives" Digitization Project
FSU Libraries Special Collections and Digital Library Center collaborated on development this presentation highlighting FSU Lives Class of 1955 digitization project along with digital preservation of faculty research as part of a guest lecture for Florida State University College of Communication & Information Spring 2011 Digital Libraries course (LIS5472) taught by Dr. Sanghee Oh., Keywords: Digital libraries, Special Collections
"Free to All"
"Free to All"
There is a significant and important responsibility as libraries move into the role of publishing to retain our heritage of "access for all." Connecting and collaborating with colleagues in the publishing industry is essential, but should come with the understanding that the library as an organization is access-prone. This article discusses the complexities of navigating that relationship, and calls for libraries and publishers to embrace and respect the position from which we begin. Finally, the article forecasts several possible characteristics of what "publishing" might look like if libraries press the principle of access in this growing area., Keywords: open access, publishing, library publishing, Note: Article as published is available at: Vandegrift, M, Bolick, J. (2014). "Free to All": Library Publishing and the Challenge of Open Access. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication 2(4):eP1181. http://dx.doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.1181 This manuscript is a preprint for an article that will be published in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication in Nov. 2014. This manuscript is released under a Creative Commons - Attribution License, meaning you are free to adapt, reuse, remix this work provided you credit the original authors., Citation: Vandegrift, M, Bolick, J. (2014). "Free to All": Library Publishing and the Challenge of Open Access. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication 2(4):eP1181. http://dx.doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.1181
4th International Digital Curation Conference - Minute Madness
4th International Digital Curation Conference - Minute Madness
This poster session will use text, diagrams, and images to display the development of the application of The DCC Curation Lifecycle Model practices to preservation of Diatomscapes. Diatomscapes represents a collection of images of biological silica and includes diatoms ("microscopic, single-celled plants that thrive in freshwater, saltwater, brackish water and even semi-terrestrial environments" (Prasad, 2005)) and Radiolarians ("any of various marine protozoans of the order Radiolaria, having rigid siliceous skeletons and spicules" (Dictionary, 2008))., Keywords: The DCC Curation Lifecycle Model, Diatomscapes, Digital Libraries, Digital Preservation, Data Management
Academic Libraries—Measuring Up
Academic Libraries—Measuring Up
Purpose: This paper aims to describe how the Florida State University Libraries used assessment data with other campus partners to gain funding and resources for new initiatives. When general funding sources were threatened, alternative funding sources from these campus partners were used to jump‐start new initiatives designed to enhance student success. Design/methodology/approach – This paper is a case study of how assessment data fueled the creation of a new late‐night peer‐tutoring program at the Florida State University Libraries. The three main data conduits that inspired a new tutoring program were: an ethnographic study of undergraduate students, undergraduate courses with high failure/high enrolment/high drop rates, and an environmental scan of existing campus tutoring. Findings: – Sharing assessment data with key partners can leverage funding and resources for new initiatives. Social implications: In hard budgetary times, opportunities for funding and resources may arise when shared values between campus constituencies are met with assessment data. Libraries need to take a leadership role in gathering and sharing those data with other campus constituents in order to place libraries in a strategic position to receive alternative funding for shared initiatives. Originality/value: Other libraries may use this case as a model, sharing their assessment results with the campus community, especially with those campus constituencies where there is a relationship already in place, to garner further support for piloting innovative services., Keywords: Academic libraries, Assessment, Budgets, Collaboration, Partnership, Student success, United States of America, Citation: Besara, R. M., & Kinsley, K. (2011). "Measuring Up: Assessment and Collaboration for Student Success." New Library World, 112(9/10), 416–424. DOI: 10.1108/03074801111182012
Access and Use Issues in Creating Collection Development and Management Policies
Access and Use Issues in Creating Collection Development and Management Policies
Access and Use Issues in Creating Collection and Management Policies: The Library/Archives Point of View" discusses the importance of documentation in collection development and management policies for access to research materials in archives and special collections. These topics include repository responsibility, restrictions, fees and services, and citations; and (2) resource sharing statements for libraries and archives such as cooperative collection development, interlibrary loan, and exhibition loan. Guidelines for borrowing and lending institutions are covered, in addition to the values of exhibit loan policies for Special Collections. There is also a link to examples of a general facility report, a condition report, and an exhibition loan agreement form., Keywords: access, use, libraries, archives, copyright, collection development, interlibrary loan, exhibitions, researchers
Acquisitions Everywhere
Acquisitions Everywhere
Acquisitions functions remain operationally crucial in providing access to paid information resources, but data formats and workflows utilized within library acquisitions remain primarily within the traditional integrated library system (ILS). As libraries have evolved to use distributed systems to manage information resources, so too must acquisitions functions adapt to an environment that may include the ILS, e‐resource management systems (ERMS), institutional repositories (IR), and other digital asset management systems (DAMS). This presentation is intended to articulate a vision for applying standards‐based practice—as already employed for resource description—to acquisitions functions in a variety of metadata schema and systems. Utilization of standards will be demonstrated in the proposal of a core acquisitions element set that can exist in any system, with proofs of concept including demonstration of the element set within MODS, JSON, and how it may be reflected within the ILS and ERMS. Building on these proofs of concept in recording interoperable acquisitions data will be an explanation of possible applications, including an exploration of more robust support for semantic web technologies. In particular, this presentation will explore how this element set could utilize published linked datasets, such as the North Carolina State University Organization Name Linked Data and Global Open Knowledgebase (GOKb) linked data service, to provide more accurate and efficient identity management., Keywords: Metadata, Library metadata, Acquisitions, Library acquisitions, Linked data, Metadata standards, Acquisitions standards, Publication Note: Also available at http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1724&context=charleston, Preferred Citation: Eric M. Hanson, Paul W. Lightcap, and Matthew R. Miguez, "Acquisitions Everywhere: Modeling an Acquisitions Data Standard to Connect a Distributed Environment" (2015). Proceedings of the Charleston Library Conference
Apps for Assessment
Apps for Assessment
Many mobile applications, also known as apps, are excellent instruments for gathering qualitative and quantitative data. This article is a starting point for those interested in gathering assessment data using mobile tools and provides assessment app type overviews and examples. With relatively little effort, libraries can take advantage of mobile apps and gather compelling assessment data more easily than ever before., Keywords: assessment, mobile, libraries, mobile device, smartphone, tablet, application, app, Note: Special Issue: Papers from the Handheld Librarian III Conference, Citation: Besara, R. M. (2012). "Apps for Assessment: A Starting Point." The Reference Librarian, 53(3), 304–309. DOI: 10.1080/02763877.2012.678791
Automating Controlled Subjects from IR Keywords
Automating Controlled Subjects from IR Keywords
When moving from a proprietary and hosted IR solution to a local and open one, an intense migration schedule necessitated some time saving measures and ETD and faculty publications were moved with only submitter-assigned keywords. After seeing the reduction of controlled subject access points, FSU’s Digital Library Center developed a python script using direct matches between the submitted keywords and subject headings in LC’s linked data service to add subject elements to MODS records. Safely in post-migration, FSU Libraries can retroactively and automatically provide controlled subject access and linked data URIs to IR materials and integrate the script into the submission workflow for improved access to future materials., Keywords: Metadata, data automation, subject access, ETDs, Institutional repositories, Publication Note: Presentation slides were taken from a live presentation at Mashcat 2017: http://www.mashcat.info/2017-event/
Basic Preservation of Family Records
Basic Preservation of Family Records
Keywords: Family records preservation
Building a donor base for college and university libraries
Building a donor base for college and university libraries
In today's economic environment, there are pressures to fundraise throughout all of the academic units at colleges and universities, including libraries. Unfortunately, however, there is no natural constituency for the academic library. While the library may have been instrumental in their successful academic career, alumni more often than not, feel no loyalty to it, as they might to their department, school, college, or even sports team. The school library, which may have served as the important cog in their academic success, is taken for granted in its apparent supporting role. Until recently, solidifying a donor base was of little consequence to the academic library; college and university libraries got by with minimal fundraising, often assisted by friends groups that provide financial support via annual membership fees and occasional fundraising events. College and university libraries friends groups are frequently made up of current and retired faculty and librarians, who understand the important role of the campus library. The trick for academic libraries in the current economy is to bring in new life and new blood in support of the library. A key to this concept is to connect the interests of potential donors with the goals and objectives of the library. Current and retired faculty and library staff understand the importance of the library and its mission; but how can the library communicate its mission in a way that attracts alumni and other community supporters?, Citation: Woodward, Eddie. Building a donor base for college and university libraries: Exploiting archives as a foundation for development. Coll. res. libr. news June 2013 74:308-311
Case for a University Archivist
Case for a University Archivist
Keywords: Archival preservation, Citation: Woodward, Eddie. "The Case for a University Archivist: Preserving Institutional Memory." College & Research Libraries News 72, no. 4 (April 2011): 26-228.
Changing the Default to Support Open Access to Education Research
Changing the Default to Support Open Access to Education Research
This essay explores factors underlying the underutilization of Open Access (OA) to make education research literature freely available online, where it can benefit a global audience of researchers, students, teachers, and policymakers. Situating this autobiographical self-study in the context of the broader global and scholarly context, we use Bullough and Pinnegar’s (2001) setting-convocation-resolution approach to present our stories as points of departure for reflection, conversation, research, and action. We do so to raise awareness and enhance understanding of the complex and rapidly evolving legal, ethical, and practical issues surrounding public accessibility to scholarship. We also issue a call to action by outlining concrete, stakeholder-specific steps that would help OA become the new default for publication of education research., Keywords: educational policy, academic publishing, open access, faculty development, policy analysis, research utilization, social justice, Publication Note: This is a peer-reviewed manuscript version of Alysia D. Roehrig, Devin Soper, Bradley E. Cox, and Gloria P. Colvin, Changing the Default to Support Open Access to Education Research, Educational Researcher 20(10) pp. 1-9. Copyright © 2018 AERA. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications. Final, published version of record available at https://doi.org/10.3102/0013189X18782974, Preferred Citation: Roehrig, A. D., Soper, D., Cox, B. E., & Colvin, G. P. (2018). Changing the default to support open access to education research. Educational Researcher 20(10). https://doi.org/10.3102/0013189X18782974
Community Code
Community Code
Publication Note: This book chapter was published in Applying Library Values to Emerging Technology: Decision-Making in the Age of Open Access, Maker Spaces, and the Ever-Changing Library (Publications in Librarianship #72) by the Association of College & Research Libraries. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License, CC BY (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Comparative analysis of automated speech recognition technologies for enhanced audiovisual accessibility
Comparative analysis of automated speech recognition technologies for enhanced audiovisual accessibility
The accessibility of digital audiovisual (AV) collections is a difficult legal and ethical area that nearly all academic libraries will need to navigate at some point. The inclusion of AV accessibility features like captions and transcripts enormously benefit users with disabilities in addition to providing extra value to the repository more universally. However, implementing these features has proven challenging for many reasons. Recent technological advancements in automatic speech recognition (ASR) and its underlying artificial intelligence (AI) technology offer an avenue for librarians in stewarding more accessible collections. This article will discuss these opportunities and present research from Florida State University Libraries evaluating the performance of different ASR tools. The authors will also present an overview of basic AV accessibility-related concepts, ethical issues in using AI technology, and a brief technical discussion of captioning formats., Web Accessibility, Automatic Speech Recognition, Audiovisual Materials, Published version of this article is available at https://journal.code4lib.org/articles/17820
Constructing a Historiography of Mexican Women and Gender
Constructing a Historiography of Mexican Women and Gender
This article outlines the historiographical importance of the International Colloquium of Women's and Gender History in Mexico, particularly in the context of the author's own scholarship, especially her dissertation. It argues for the need for women's and gender history, and for a dialogue, by means of which these separate but related bodies of scholarship can inform the other. It includes a summary of the author's dissertation and its theoretical influences, a review of historical topics discussed at the first two conferences of the International Colloquium of Women's and Gender History, and a discussion of the historiographical implications of such developments., Keywords: Gender, Mexico, History, Historiography, Note: The definitive version is available on the journal's website, DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-0424.2007.00508.x, Citation: Buck, S. A. (2008), Constructing a Historiography of Mexican Women and Gender. Gender & History, 20: 152–160. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-0424.2007.00508.x
Copyright Modernization Act: A guide for post-secondary instructors
Copyright Modernization Act: A guide for post-secondary instructors
In November 2012, the educational provisions of the Copyright Modernization Act were proclaimed in force, thereby introducing a number of significant changes to the Canadian Copyright Act. These changes include the expansion of fair dealing to include the purpose of education, the addition of new educational exceptions for the online transmission of lessons and the use of work freely available through the internet, and a number of amendments that make existing educational exceptions more technologically accommodating. This paper considers the significance of these changes for post-secondary instructors, first contextualizing the changes in relation to recent fair dealing jurisprudence, and then considering their significance for everyday instructional practice. Drawing on influential court decisions and the commentary of academics and lawyers, the paper not only describes how the changes to the Copyright Act have expanded the rights and exceptions available to instructors, but also identifies a number of unresolved questions about how the changes should be applied in practice. Despite these areas of uncertainty, the paper concludes that the changes bode well for post-secondary instructors, as they relax many long-standing restrictions around the use of copyrighted works for educational purposes., Keywords: Higher education, Copyright, Copyright exceptions, Fair dealing, User's rights, Preferred Citation: Soper, Devin (2013) "The Copyright Modernization Act: A Guide for Post-Secondary Instructors," The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Vol. 4: Iss. 1, Article 6. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5206/cjsotl-rcacea.2013.1.6
Core Competencies for Subject Librarians at the Florida State University Libraries
Core Competencies for Subject Librarians at the Florida State University Libraries
In response to changing roles of subject librarians, Florida State University Libraries identified three basic, overarching values of the subject librarian program, and flowing out from those values, five core competencies. The values—engagement, advocacy, and collaboration—are a priority of all subject librarians and help to define a common identity. The core competencies—research services, scholarly communication, use of digital tools, teaching, and collection development and access—are benchmarks for superior service., Keywords: subject librarian, liaison, core competencies, best practices, values
Correlation Does Not Equal Causality
Correlation Does Not Equal Causality
As we move into the third decade of the twenty-first century, the amount of data being generated and accessible to the public continues to grow at a rapid pace. Data are present and utilized in different contexts by many people, including academic researchers, private companies, and government agencies. However, with greater access to data comes a heightened risk that incorrect or incomplete information will be presented as fact. Data are highly amenable to manipulation and can then be passed off in the media as fact. For these reasons, it is often difficult to determine the accuracy and reliability of certain data. To combat these issues, we can introduce critical thinking and data literacy education into our workshop curriculum. The purpose of this chapter is to introduce a workshop session and activities designed to present general data literacy principles and practices in a way that is understandable and accessible to a wide student audience., Data literacy, Statistics, Infographics, Correlation, Causation, Data visualization, Data, ISBN: 9780838939253
Cross Staffing at FSU Libraries
Cross Staffing at FSU Libraries
Inspiration can be found in a variety of ways such as technology, conferences, and other academic settings. However, sometimes, something as unusual as budget cuts can inspire an innovative, new program. Like many other university libraries, Florida State University (FSU) Libraries faced a budget decrease, but, still insisted on maintaining a consistent level of service for all of our patrons. This inspired staff to think outside of the box and to develop a cross-staffing service model that provides outstanding customer service, establishes an accurate referral system and facilitates the professional development of staff by creating a better understanding of other departments’ policies and procedures.
De-Centering and Recentering Digital Scholarship
De-Centering and Recentering Digital Scholarship
Digital scholarship is an evolving area of librarianship. In this piece we propose 10 theses, statements about what this kind of work DOES, rather than trying to define with it IS. We believe that digitally-inflected research and learning, and the characteristics they employ, are essential to the recentering of our profession's position in/across the academy. We also believe that the "digital scholarship center" has served its time, and that the activities and models for digital scholarship work are core to librarianship. This manifesto is meant to serve as a starting point for a necessary discussion, not an end-all, be-all. We hope others will write and share counter-manifestos, passionate responses, or affirming statements., Keywords: digital scholarship, scholarly communication, librarianship, manifesto, Publication Note: This is a pre-print of the work., Preferred Citation: Moritz, C., Smart, R. J., Retteen, A., Hunter, M., Stanley, S., Soper, D., & Vandegrift, M. De-Centering and Recentering Digital Scholarship: A Manifesto. LIS Scholarship Archive Preprints. dx.doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/T7HFU

Pages