You are here

Social Support

Permalink: https://diginole.lib.fsu.edu/islandora/object/fsu:plaid_social_support
 Living with Diabetes in a Historically Black Community
Living with Diabetes in a Historically Black Community
Objective: This research report shares insights gained from residents in a historically black community in Florida concerning their experiences living with diabetes.Methods: The findings in this research report draw from three focus groups undertaken to gather patient perspectives on potential causes and mechanisms related to a community setting with higher than national average levels of diabetes (both in relation to the broader population and Black Americans specifically) as part of an applied project geared toward establishing potential interventions that could benefit the community.Results: Participants in the focus groups discussed (1) positive efforts to improve diet; (2) less successful efforts to increase exercise levels, and (3) marked differences in experiences with medical professionals and access to quality medical care.Conclusions: These findings illustrate difficulties patients experience seeking to manage diabetes in relation to structural (i.e., racial, healthcare access, and economic) and interpersonal (i.e., medical professionals) barriers to quality care., diabetes, Black Americans, historically black, management, access, healthcare
Glycaemic Control and Practice of Self-Care Behaviors among People with Type 2 Diabetes in Nigeria
Glycaemic Control and Practice of Self-Care Behaviors among People with Type 2 Diabetes in Nigeria
Objective: The practice of self-care behaviors by patients with diabetes mellitus plays a vital role in achieving optimal glycaemic control. Previous Nigerian studies discussed how the knowledge of self-care behaviors among people with diabetes influences glycaemic control rather than the impact of these behaviors on glycaemic control. This study assesses the relationship between the practice of diabetes self-care behaviors and glycaemic control.Research Design and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among people with type 2 diabetes at the medical outpatient clinic of the hospital. Three hundred and sixteen participants were recruited over four months, however, due to incomplete data only 313 of these participants were analyzed. Data on respondents’ characteristics and level of self-care behaviors were obtained using a pretested questionnaire and Summary of Diabetic Self-Care Activities (SDSCA). A1C was used as an indicator of glycaemic control.Results: The proportion of the participants with “good” glycaemic control and “good” practice of self-care behaviors were 40.6% and 26.8% respectively. Female gender (P=0.002, OR=4.23), using only oral hypoglycaemic agents (P=0.029, OR=4.83), the absence of truncal obesity (P<0.001, OR=15.33), and “good” practice of self-care behavior (P<0.001, OR=5.86) were predictors of “good” glycaemic control.Conclusions: The proportion of patients with “good” glycaemic control and “good” practice of self-care behaviors were low. The predictors of glycaemic control in this study, which included medical and non-medical components of diabetes care, underscores the importance of a multi-pronged approach involving prescriptive practices by physicians and improved self-care behavioral practices by patients., diabetes, Nigeria, management, self-care
People and Living. With Diabetes.
People and Living. With Diabetes.
On Wednesday, June 5, 2019 the diabetes community lost a guiding light for what it means to live your best life, with diabetes, despite complications. Kimberly Hilsop, a friend and advocate for every person with diabetes that she encountered, passed away unexpectedly at the age of 37 due to complications related to living with type 1 diabetes. For those of us who knew her and were fortunate enough to call her a friend, we have been forced to consider our own mortality, and learn to host an emptiness that Kim’s presence left vacated. In the years that I knew Kim, she taught me that the most important part about people living with diabetes was never the “with diabetes” piece. It was always about the people, and it was always about living., living with diabetes, support
Reflections and Transmutations: A Portrait of the Diabetic as a Young Man
Reflections and Transmutations: A Portrait of the Diabetic as a Young Man
My life as I had known it would become what the physician and historian Chris Feudtner termed, transmuted. He argued, diabetes as a disease concept had transmuted, changing over time by society’s interference in its natural progression. And so began my transmutation, as I reflect upon my life, the life of a young man as a diabetic whose natural progression was altered less by the disease and more by society’s attempts to define and control it, living with diabetes, management, narrative
Understanding Social Support Programs for Individuals Living with Type 1 Diabetes
Understanding Social Support Programs for Individuals Living with Type 1 Diabetes
Objective: Limited research is available examining community-based social support programs (SSPs) for individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). The purpose of this study was to describe SSPs characteristics and the perceived benefits and barriers to attendance from the perspective of SSPs leaders.Research Design and Methods: This study used a qualitative study design. In-depth interviews were conducted with SSPs leaders (n=9) in the Washington D.C. metro area. Individuals were recruited from community- and college-based programs. Using content analysis, interviews were analyzed for key themes.Results: Programs served different populations, leading to different discussion such as college-based groups discussing alcohol use while community-based groups discussing issues with their child’s diabetes. SSPs leaders described informational support, emotional support, and peer networking as benefits of program attendance while logistics, stigma, and avoidance of diabetes as barriers to program attendance.Conclusions: Exploring the characteristics of SSPs is essential to understanding their utilization and role in self-management and empowering individuals with T1DM. SSPs offer many benefits, and SSP attendance should be encouraged., diabetes, support, programs, management