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Assessing Early Elementary Students' Place Value Understanding
Assessing Early Elementary Students' Place Value Understanding
Summary: This document contains a set of materials we created, selected, or adapted for the purpose of assessing children’s understanding of place value. These materials were sequenced to form a diagnostic assessment for use in a one-on-one, interview-type setting. The resulting collection of tasks and questions require approximately 20–30 minutes to administer with an individual child. The assessment is designed for diagnostic purposes. It is not intended to generate an achievement score., Keywords: mathematics education, mathematics, early elementary mathematics, elementary students, place value, children's mathematics, place value mathematics, Preferred Citation: Bray, W. S., Champagne, Z. M., Blais, T. V., and Schoen, R. C. (2017). Assessing early elementary students’ place value understanding: A set of interview tasks. (Research Report No. 2017-28). Tallahassee, FL: Learning Systems Institute. DOI: 10.17125/fsu.1510066800, Grant Number: FL Department of Education, Award Numbers: 371-2355B-5C001, 371-2356B-6C001, and 371-2357B-7C004
Cultivating Dynamic Educators
Cultivating Dynamic Educators
The purpose of this case study was to examine the contribution of the pre-service interventions within the Reading for Ethiopia’s Achievement Developed Technical Assistance (READ-TA) program, funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) from October 2012 through December 2017. Of particular interest were revisions of the mother tongue pre-service teacher education program and the related professional development for teacher educators and student teachers (we use the term teacher educators to refer to the lecturers and instructors at the colleges of teacher education and the term student teachers to refer to the students at colleges of teacher education, also referred to in Ethiopia as “teacher-trainees” and “wouldbe- teachers”). The professional development activities included engagement of these educators in module development, adaptation of the modules and related materials into seven mother tongues,2 and training on the module contents. The objectives of this chapter are to describe the extent to which teacher educators’ involvement across multiple initiatives promoted changes in conceptions of literacy instruction; depth of understanding of literacy content; and student-centered, participatory teaching and learning pedagogy. (For this chapter, the term literacy encompasses reading, writing, speaking, and listening.) To document changes in conceptions, knowledge, and skills, we collected data throughout the life of the project to gather teacher educators’ reflections on learning processes, changes in teaching practices, and student teachers’ readiness to teach the new primary curriculum., Keywords: teacher education, Ethiopia, Publication Note: This publication is part of the RTI Press Book series. https://doi.org/10.3768/rtipress.2018.bk.0022.1809 This work is distributed under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 license (CC BY-NC-ND), a copy of which is available at https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode., Preferred Citation: Mekonnen, D., Fesmire, M., Barnes, A., Backman, S., Ramos-Mattoussi, F. (2018). Changing Teacher Educators’ Conceptions and Practices on Literacy Instruction: Lessons from Teacher Educators’ Professional Development Experiences in Ethiopia. In Pouezevara, S. R. (Ed.) (2018). Cultivating dynamic educators: Case studies in teacher behavior change in Africa and Asia. (RTI Press Publication No. BK-0022-1809). Research Triangle Park, NC: RTI Press. DOI: 10.3768/rtipress.2018.bk.0022.1809. https://www.rti.org/rti-press-publication/cultivating-dynamic-educators
Description of the Cognitively Guided Instruction Professional Development Program in Florida: 2013–2020
Description of the Cognitively Guided Instruction Professional Development Program in Florida: 2013–2020
Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI) is a teacher PD program that has been found to have a potentially positive impact on student learning in mathematics through randomized controlled trials. Through a series of grant-funded projects led by FSU, approximately 2,000 Florida teachers have participated in CGI-based professional development in the past 8 years. This paper describes the core features of the CGI-based PD programs that were implemented in Florida during that time period. We provide this information to help researchers and practitioners to understand the context in which the associated research studies occurred and interpret the available and forthcoming findings related to the impacts of the interventions., Schoen, R. C., Bray, W.S., Tazaz, A. M., & Buntin, C. K. (2022). A description of the Cognitively Guided Instruction professional development program in Florida: 2013–2020. Learning Systems Institute, Florida State University., R305A120781, R305A180429, 371-2355B-5C001, 371-2356B-6C001, 371-2357B-7C004, U423A180115
Development and Initial Field Test of the 2016 K-TEEM (Knowledge for Teaching Early Elementary Mathematics) Test
Development and Initial Field Test of the 2016 K-TEEM (Knowledge for Teaching Early Elementary Mathematics) Test
The 2016 Knowledge for Teaching Early Elementary Mathematics (2016 K-TEEM) test measures teachers’ mathematical knowledge for teaching early elementary mathematics. The 2016 K-TEEM is the third version of the K-TEEM (Schoen, Bray, Wolfe, Tazaz, & Nielsen, 2017). In this report, we present results of the first large-scale field test of the 2016 K-TEEM test with 383 practicing educators. The report contains information about the development process used for the test, a description of the sample, descriptions of the procedures used for data entry, scoring of responses, and analysis of data, recommended scoring procedures, and findings regarding the distribution of test scores, standard error of measurement, reliability estimates, and suggestion for additional validation efforts to be conducted in the future., Preferred Citation: Schoen, R. C., Yang, X., Tazaz, A. M., Bray, W., & Farina, K. (2019). Development and Initial Field Test of the 2016 K-TEEM (Knowledge for Teaching Early Elementary Mathematics) Test (Research Report No. 2019-01). Tallahassee, FL: Florida State University., Grant Number: R305A120781, 371-2355B-5C001
Development and Validation of a Revised Version of the Math Anxiety Scale for Young Children.
Development and Validation of a Revised Version of the Math Anxiety Scale for Young Children.
Although there is an extensive amount of research that examines the relation between math anxiety and math performance in adolescents and adults, little work has focused on this relation in young children. Recently more attention has been paid to the early development of math anxiety, and new measures have been created for use with this age group. In the present study, we report on the development and validation of a revised version of the Math Anxiety Scale for Young Children (MASYC; Harari et al., 2013). We conducted cognitive interviews with the 12 MASYC items with nine children and then administered the MASYC and five newly-developed items to 296 first-, second- and third-grade children. Results from cognitive interviews show that three of the items from the original scale were being systematically misinterpreted by young children. We present a revised measure (the MASYC-R) consisting of 13 items (eight original, five newly-developed) that shows strong evidence for reliability and validity. Results also showed that a small, but meaningful, proportion of children at this age show signs of high math anxiety. Validity of the MASYC-R was supported through correlations with a number of other factors, including general anxiety, math performance, and math attitudes. In addition, results suggest that a substantial proportion of the variance in math anxiety can be explained from these other variables together. The findings suggest that the MASYC-R is appropriate for use with young children and can help researchers to answer important questions about the nature and development of math anxiety at this age., Keywords: Elementary-school children, Gender, Math anxiety, Math attitudes, Math performance, Publication Note: This NIH-funded author manuscript originally appeared in PubMed Central at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4995220.
Effects of the first year of a three-year CGI teacher professional-development program on grades 3–5 student achievement
Effects of the first year of a three-year CGI teacher professional-development program on grades 3–5 student achievement
Summary: Mathematics teacher professional-development (PD) programs based on Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI) have been developed and implemented with tens of thousands of elementary mathematics teachers worldwide since the 1980s. Starting with a focus on addition and subtraction on whole numbers in the first CGI PD program, the content of these courses has expanded over time. In this study, we used a multisite cluster-randomized trial to estimate the impact of the first year of a three-year CGI teacher professional-development program. This CGI PD program designed for grades three, four, and five teachers. The content of the program focused on fractions concepts and operations on fractions, multiplication and division on whole numbers, and algebraic thinking. The randomized sample included 149 teachers and their students, representing 32 schools in nine public school districts in Florida. Student outcomes were measured by the Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment (EMSA). The CGI 3–5 PD program was found to significantly impact student performance on the EMSA test (p =.007) in the first year of the three-year program. The point estimate of the main effect of the CGI program on student achievement (g = .18) was greater than many of the most effective teacher professional-development programs that have been subjected to rigorous evaluation., Keywords: mathematics, mathematics education, fractions, randomized trial, teacher education, professional development, Preferred Citation: Schoen, R. C., LaVenia, M., & Tazaz, A. M. (2018). Effects of the first year of a three-year CGI teacher professional development program on grades 3–5 student achievement: A multisite cluster-randomized trial (Research Report No. 2018-25). Tallahassee, FL: Learning Systems Institute, Florida State University., Grant Number: 371-2355B-5C001, 371-2356B-6C001, and 371-2357B- 7C004
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
The research and development reported here were supported by the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, through Award No. R305A120781 to Florida State University. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not represent views of the Institute or the U.S. Department of Education., Preferred Citation: Schoen, R. C., LaVenia, M., Bauduin, C., & Farina, K. (2016). Elementary mathematics student assessment: Measuring the performance of grade 1 and 2 students in counting, word problems, and computation in fall 2014 (Research Report No. 2016-04). Tallahassee, FL: Learning Systems Institute, Florida State University., Grant Number: R305A120781
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
The research and development reported here were supported by the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, through Award No. R305A120781 to Florida State University. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not represent views of the Institute or the U.S. Department of Education., Preferred Citation: Schoen, R. C., LaVenia, M., Bauduin, C., & Farina, K. (2016). Elementary mathematics student assessment: Measuring the performance of grade 1 and 2 students in counting, word problems, and computation in fall 2013 (Research Report No. 2016-03). Tallahassee, FL: Learning Systems Institute, Florida State University., Grant Number: R305A120781
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
This report provides a description of the development process, field testing, and psychometric properties of a student mathematics test designed to assess grades K, 1, and 2 student abilities. The test was administered to 4,486 participating grade K, 1, and 2 students in 67 schools located in 10 public school districts in Florida during fall 2015. Focused on counting, word problems, and computation, the student assessment was designed to serve as a baseline measure of student achievement for use as a covariate in a randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of a teacher professional development program called Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI) on student learning., Preferred Citation: Schoen, R. C., Anderson, D., Champagne, Z., & Bauduin, C. (2017). Elementary mathematics student assessment: Measuring the performance of grade K, 1, and 2 students in counting, word problems, and computation in fall 2015. (Research Report No. 2017-20.) Tallahassee, FL: Learning Systems Institute, Florida State University., Grant Number: 371-2355B-5C001, 371-2356B-6C001, 371-2357B-7C004
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
This report provides a description of the development process, field testing, and psychometric properties of a student mathematics test designed to assess grades K, 1, and 2 student abilities. The test was administered to 4,535 participating grade K, 1, and 2 students in 66 schools located in 9 public school districts in Florida during spring 2016. Focused on number, operations, and equality, the student assessment was designed to serve as a baseline measure of student achievement in a randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of a teacher professional development program called Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI) on student learning., Preferred Citation: Schoen, R. C., Anderson, D., & Bauduin, C. (2017). Elementary mathematics student assessment: Measuring the performance of grade K, 1, and 2 students in number, operations, and equality in spring 2016. (Research Report No. 2017-22). Tallahassee, FL: Learning Systems Institute, Florida State University., Grant Number: 371-2355B-5C001, 371-2356B-6C001, and 371-2357B-7C004
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
This report provides a description of the development process, field testing, and psychometric properties of the fall 2015 grades 3–5 Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment (EMSA), a student mathematics test designed to be administered in a whole-group setting to students in grades 3, 4, and 5. The test was administered to 2,614 participating grade 3, 4, and 5 students in 266 classrooms located in 10 public school districts in Florida during fall 2015. Focused on number (including whole number and fractions), operations, and algebraic thinking, the student assessment was designed to serve as a baseline measure of student achievement for use as a covariate in a randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of a teacher professional development program on student learning., Preferred Citation: Schoen, R. C., Anderson, D., Riddell, C. M., & Bauduin, C. (2018). Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment: Measuring the performance of grade 3, 4, and 5 students in number (whole numbers and fractions), operations, and algebraic thinking in fall 2015 (Research Report No. 2018-24). Tallahassee, FL: Learning Systems Institute, Florida State University., Grant Number: 371-2355B-5C001, 371-2356B-6C001, and 371-2357B-7C004
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
This report provides a description of the development process, field testing, and psychometric properties of a student mathematics test designed to assess grades K, 1, 2, and 3 student abilities. The test was administered to 2,556 participating grade K, 1, 3, and 3 students in 29 schools located in four public school districts in Florida during spring 2019. Focused on number, operations, and algebraic thinking, the student assessment was designed to measure student mathematics performance for an observational study examining the effects of teacher math anxiety and student math anxiety on student mathematics performance., Schoen, R. C., Buntin, C., Guven, A., & Yang, X. (2021). Elementary mathematics student assessment: Measuring the performance of grade K, 1, 2, and 3 students in number (whole numbers and fractions), operations, and algebraic thinking in spring 2019. (Research Report No. 2021-03). Florida State University. DOI:10.33009/fsu-1622059548, R305A170463
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
Elementary Mathematics Student Assessment
This report provides a description of the development process, field testing, and psychometric properties of a student mathematics test designed to assess grades 3, 4, and 5 student abilities. The test was administered to 2,754 participating grade 3, 4, and 5 students in 55 schools located in 10 public school districts in Florida during spring 2016. Focused on number (including whole number and fractions), operations, and algebraic thinking, the student assessment was designed to serve as a baseline measure of student achievement in a randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of a teacher professional development program called Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI) on student learning., Schoen, R. C., Anderson, D., & Bauduin, C. (2018). Elementary mathematics student assessment: Measuring grade 3, 4, and 5 students’ performance in number (whole numbers and fractions), operations, and algebraic thinking in spring 2016. (Research Report No. 2018-26). Tallahassee, FL: Learning Systems Institute, Florida State University., 371-2355B-5C001, 371-2356B-6C001, and 371-2357B-7C004
Evaluation of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program Participation, Compliance and Test Scores in 2016-17
Evaluation of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program Participation, Compliance and Test Scores in 2016-17
Florida Legislature created the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program in 2001 to expand educational opportunities for children of families that have limited financial resources and to enable children to achieve a greater level of excellence in their education. This report examines the effectiveness of the Tax Credit Scholarship Program for the 2016-2017 school year in general as well as at various sub-group levels., Kisa, Z., Dyehouse, M., Park, T., Andrews-Larson, B., & Herrington, C. (2018).Evaluation of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program Participation, Compliance, and Test Scores 2016-2017. Annual evaluation report submitted to the Florida Department of Education.
Evaluation of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program Participation, Compliance and Test Scores in 2017-18
Evaluation of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program Participation, Compliance and Test Scores in 2017-18
To expand educational opportunities for children of families that have limited financial resources and to enable children in this state to achieve a greater level of excellence in their education, the Florida Legislature created the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program in 2001. This report examines the effectiveness of the Tax Credit Scholarship Program for the 2017-2018 school year in general as well as at various sub-group levels., Tax Credit Scholarship, School Choice, Kisa, Z., Dyehouse, M., Benz, M., & Herrington, C. (2019). Evaluation of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program Participation, Compliance, and Test Scores 2017-2018. Annual evaluation report submitted to the Florida Department of Education.
Evaluation of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program Participation, Compliance and Test Scores in 2018-19
Evaluation of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program Participation, Compliance and Test Scores in 2018-19
To expand educational opportunities for children of families that have limited financial resources and to enable children in this state to achieve a greater level of excellence in their education, the Florida Legislature created the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program in 2001. This report examines the effectiveness of the Tax Credit Scholarship Program for the 2018-2019 school year in general as well as at various sub-group levels., Tax Credit Scholarship, School Choice, Kisa, Z., Dyehouse, M., Benz, M., & Herrington, C. (2020). Evaluation of the Florida Tax Credit Scholarship Program Participation, Compliance, and Test Scores 2018-2019 (Annual Evaluation Report). Florida Department of Education.
External Evaluation of the Women’s Leadership Program in Paraguay: Evaluation Report. [174 p.]
External Evaluation of the Women’s Leadership Program in Paraguay: Evaluation Report. [174 p.]
This evaluation report of the Women’s Leadership Program in Paraguay was produced at the request of Higher Education for Development with support from the United States Agency for International Development. It was prepared by Flavia Ramos-Mattoussi and Venus Caballero, consultants to HED. The Women’s Leadership Program in Paraguay (WLPP) was a three-year (2012-2015) higher education partnership funded and supported by Higher Education for Development (HED), in cooperation with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID/Paraguay). HED worked with EGAT/ED and USAID/Paraguay under the Women’s Leadership Program to support the partnership between the National University of Asuncion (UNA) in Paraguay and the University of Florida (UF) in the United States. The WLP Paraguay partnership contributes to the primary objectives of the overall Women’s Leadership Program framework. It supports national and local development goals in Paraguay that promote gender equality and female empowerment in the agricultural sector. The evaluation team composed of Dr. Flavia Ramos-Mattoussi (international consultant) and Ms. Venus Caballero (local consultant) was contracted by HED to conduct the external (end-of-project) evaluation of the WLP-Paraguay to learn how the partnership has contributed and could continue contributing to the promotion of gender equality and female empowerment in agriculture. The team examined the following aspects of the program: (1) efficiency of management processes and systems; (2) relevance of program design; (3) effectiveness of program implementation; (4) impact of program intervention; and (5) potential for program sustainability. The evaluation was conducted from February 4 to July 31, 2015. Fieldwork was carried out from April 6 to May 25, 2015, including work in the United States and in Paraguay. The technical report contains data collection tools and analysis of data gathered in the United States and in Paraguay for the External Evaluation of the Women’s Leadership Program in Paraguay (February-July 2015). The report has been published by HED/ACE/ USAID-Development Experience Clearinghouse., Keywords: Women's leadership, Girls' education, University partnerships, International development, Agriculture, Paraguay, Preferred Citation: Ramos-Mattoussi, F. & Caballero, V. (July 2015). External Evaluation of the Women’s Leadership Program in Paraguay: Evaluation Report. [174 p.] Higher Education for Development (HED), American Council on Education (ACE). USAID/DEC, Washington, DC. http://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PA00KNGF.pdf
Formative Assessment Collaborative Team (FACT) Meetings
Formative Assessment Collaborative Team (FACT) Meetings
Formative Assessment Collaborative Team (FACT) meetings provide educators with a structured time each week to engage in peer collaboration focused on students’ mathematical thinking. In these meetings, educators work together to analyze their students’ mathematical thinking and make purposeful adaptations to instructional plans based on the insight gained through the process. The FACT meetings use a structured protocol and weekly record-keeping documents to focus the topics of discussions, provide a mechanism for accountability, and promote consistency of the process across teams of teachers.
Mathematics Performance and Cognition (MPAC) Interview
Mathematics Performance and Cognition (MPAC) Interview
The following report describes an assessment instrument called the Mathematics Performance and Cognition (MPAC) interview. As the name implies, the MPAC interview is administered in an interview setting. The 2015 MPAC interview was designed to measure first and second graders’ mathematics achievement and cognitive processes in the domain of number, operations, and algebraic thinking. The MPAC interview was designed to measure two primary outcomes of interest: to be a mathematics achievement test and to gather information about students’ cognitive processes while they solve mathematics problems. The current report focuses on the content of the interview, interview protocol, scoring procedures, and psychometric properties for the achievement focus of the MPAC Interview. The 2015 MPAC interview was administered to 856 students in spring 2015 in 22 schools located in two school districts in Florida. The school districts were implementing a curriculum based on the Mathematics Florida Standards, which are very similar to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics., Preferred Citation: Schoen, R. C., LaVenia, M., Champagne, Z. M., Farina, K., & Tazaz, A. M. (2016). Mathematics performance and cognition (MPAC) interview: Measuring first- and second-grade student achievement in number, operations, and equality in spring 2015. (Research Report No. 2016–02). Tallahassee, FL: Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics., Grant Number: R305A120781
Mathematics Performance and Cognition (MPAC) Interview
Mathematics Performance and Cognition (MPAC) Interview
This report provides an overview of the development, implementation, and psychometric properties of a student mathematics interview designed to assess first- and second-grade student achievement and thinking processes. The student interview was conducted with 622 first- or second-grade students in 22 schools located in two public school districts in a single state in the southeastern U.S. during spring 2014. Focused on the domain of number, operations, and equality, the student interview was designed (a) to measure student achievement in mathematics and (b) to gather information about the strategies students use to solve the mathematics problems. Because the interview was designed for both of these purposes, we call it the Mathematics Performance and Achievement (MPAC) interview., Preferred Citation: Schoen, R. C., LaVenia, M., Champagne, Z. M., & Farina, K. (2016). Mathematics performance and cognition (MPAC) interview: Measuring first- and second-grade student achievement in number, operations, and equality in spring 2014. (Research Report No. 2016–01). Tallahassee, FL:Learning Systems Institute., Grant Number: R305A120781

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