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Undergraduate Honors Theses

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"Trafalgar Square Conservation Area"
"Trafalgar Square Conservation Area"
Abstract: (Key Terms: Collective Framework, Rhetorical Theory, Trafalgar Square, Spatial Narratives) This thesis is a rhetorical examination of language as elicited in spatial narratives. In doing so, it examines the various symbols that public spaces employ in order to rhetorically speak to us, move us, and make us act in certain ways. More specifically, it addresses Trafalgar Square as a problem space, deconstructing the various spatial narratives leading into and within the square. In deconstructing these narratives, it attempts to find implicit meaning in what is explicitly inscribed into the land, and to examine this meaning alongside the social narrative that its occupants hold. This constructed narrative is explored through three frameworks: that of the physical framework of the square, those spatially enacted frameworks leading into it, and the larger collective framework of the city to which the square contributes. It finds that the frameworks of public space generally work toward establishing and authorizing a unifying ideological connection between the present society and societies of the past. However, these narratives are dependent on individual agents participating in the space's various frameworks; the meaning of a space is obfuscated by a society's current participant's usage of the space. In addition to this obfuscation, it discovers that the past role of a space can obfuscate the present meaning and role of the space in the overall framework, and that the present meaning can in turn obfuscate how individuals relate to and interpret the past., Keywords: Trafalgar Square, Rhetorical Theory, Collective Framework, Spatial Narratives, British Imperialism, Visual Rhetoric, Memory Studies, Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of English in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Honors in the Major., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2014., Date of Defense: April 18, 2014.
"Untamed Music"
"Untamed Music"
Vaudeville, which was one of the most influential entertainment genres in America at the turn of the century, was also important to the early development of jazz. Vaudeville's role in jazz history has not often figured into discussions of early jazz because the earliest jazz historians were record collectors who relied heavily on sound recordings to establish the history of the music, leading them to marginalize the contributions of musicians or bands that did not make records. Touring vaudeville, minstrel shows, and circuses played a crucial role in jazz's development and dissemination. Many of the influential jazz artists of the teens and twenties, such as Alvin "Zoo" Robertson, Wilbur Sweatman, Freddie Keppard, and Ferdinand "Jelly Roll" Morton began their careers playing in tents and theaters around the country as vaudeville entertainers. Traveling vaudeville shows were the most significant factor in the spread of jazz before the advent of recording, and brought early jazz to appreciative audiences even before 1917, when the first jazz recordings became available. After these initial recordings, the shows carried jazz to remote areas of the country where jazz records were less likely to be available. These shows continued to be important for the careers of jazz musicians until the mid thirties, when the ascendance of film and radio led to vaudeville's terminal decline. In this paper I explore in detail the role that touring vaudeville shows played in the development and popularization of jazz in the first decades of the twentieth century., Keywords: jazz, vaudeville, early jazz, jazz history, Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for graduation with Honors in the Major., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2013., Date of Defense: November 26, 2012.
"Why Should We Cultivate Our Gardens?"
"Why Should We Cultivate Our Gardens?"
This thesis explores “leisure” as an important, if not vital, component in cross-cultural studies. I work through, what I perceive to be the formative time periods, the end of the nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth century, in regards to the development of cultural specific leisure time negotiation. I have approached the idea of leisure from several different theoretical and epistemological angles, historical, literary, rhetorical and anthropological. My goal in this project was not to expose a new idea, as leisure has been studied extensively, rather my aim is to shrink the gap between studies. I have connected research across different disciplines in order to present a case for the inclusion of leisure in the academic discourse and present its relevance as a genre, rather as idea., Keywords: leisure, Western, Peru, Indigenous
'OSTINATO'
'OSTINATO'
In my work I hope to explore the repetitive nature of human history, looking at how our nature has effected our health, moral values, and societal standards through a case study of the history of anatomical studies and comparing its history with that of stem cell research.
(How) Do You Regret Killing One to Save Five? Affective and Cognitive Regret Differ After Utilitarian and Deontological Sacrificial Dilemma Decisions
(How) Do You Regret Killing One to Save Five? Affective and Cognitive Regret Differ After Utilitarian and Deontological Sacrificial Dilemma Decisions
Sacrificial moral dilemmas, in which opting to kill one person will save multiple others, are definitionally suboptimal: Someone dies either way. Decision-makers, then, may experience regret about their decisions. Past research dissociates affective regret, negative feelings about a decision, from cognitive regret, wishful thoughts about a counterfactual decision. Classic dual-process models of moral judgment suggest that affective processing drives characteristically deontological decisions to reject outcome-maximizing harm, whereas cognitive deliberation drives characteristically utilitarian decisions to endorse outcome-maximizing harm. Consistent with this model, we found that people who made or imagined making sacrificial utilitarian judgments expressed relatively more affective regret and relatively less cognitive regret than those who made or imagined making deontological dilemma judgments. In other words, people who endorsed causing harm to save lives felt more distressed about their decision but were less inclined to change it than people who rejected outcome-maximizing harm., Keywords: moral dilemmas, regret, affective regret, cognitive regret, dual-process model
100 Cups for a 100 Lives
100 Cups for a 100 Lives
Keywords: ceramics, art, roadkill, Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of Art in partial fulfillment of the requirements for graduation with Honors in the Major., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2015., Date of Defense: November 24, 2015.
100% Renewable Energy Strategy for Tallahassee, Florida
100% Renewable Energy Strategy for Tallahassee, Florida
In 2017, the City Commission of Tallahassee voted to adopt the US Conference of Mayors proclamation to move the city’s energy to 100% Renewable Energy by 2035. In this thesis, the potential sources of renewable energy for Tallahassee are reviewed, and solar photovoltaic cells (PV) is found to be effectively the only renewable energy source. Current renewable energy sources for the transportation sector were modeled to be entirely based on switching the vehicle fleet to electric vehicles (EVs) which increased the electrical demand by about 30%. The infrastructure costs of solar PV are anticipated to be large, which could limit the city in attaining its renewable energy goals. The costs associated with installing utility-scale solar PV sufficient to displace the entire electrical energy demand of the city is examined. Three scenarios for the rate of PV installation were assessed: (1) a linear installation rate of 90 MW-DC/year; (2) an exponential rate of installation; (3) a constant spending rate, that all yielded sufficient energy to displace all projected natural gas electricity production. The key assumption proved to be the projection algorithm for the future costs of solar PV panels which was taken to be an exponential function with a seven-year e-folding time. Each of the scenarios yielded fiscal savings by displacing the natural gas fuel cost. Increasing the entire costs of solar PV by a factor of two still yielded a long-term savings for the city. Land costs for installing sufficient utility-scale solar PV were found to add an additional 15-25 % to the total costs. Strategies that the city could adopt to further reduce costs, like encouraging rooftop solar, solar water heating, home batteries, etc., are examined and could reduce costs by about a third. All scenarios led to a substantial integrated CO2 emissions reduction of about 50% relative to a business-as-usual scenario. Post-2035, CO2 emissions are zero. Finally, the impact of the city’s recently adopted 100% Renewable Energy by 2050 goal is assessed., Keywords: Tallahassee, Renewable Energy, Solar, Energy, Florida, Battery, Time of Use Rates, Electric Vehicles
3D Printed Modular Structures
3D Printed Modular Structures
The surge of single-use plastics consumption has generated vast volumes of polymer waste, threatening water supplies, marine wildlife, and quality of life in low-income communities. Mechanical recycling is suggested as the most sustainable method to reduce polymer pollution because it may extend the life cycle for these products. This study aims to use 3D printing technology as a means to process recycled High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) to produce honeycomb sandwich core panels. These structures benefit from the lattice design as it can provide greater strength with a relatively low weight nature, and is commonly used in the automotive, aerospace, and the architecture industry. Honeycomb sandwich core panel’s wide range of applications may benefit from the transition from directly sourced polymers to a recycled alternative.To test the hypothesis that recycled HDPE may be used as an alternative material for the fabrication of honeycomb sandwich core panels, the material properties were analyzed through a tensile strength test, geometries were modeled, verified and optimized under Finite Element Analysis, recycled HDPE filament was obtained in the laboratory to produce panels via 3D printing., Garnet and Gold Scholar Society IDEA Grant

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