You are here

Theses and Dissertations

Permalink: https://diginole.lib.fsu.edu/islandora/object/fsu:etds
Collection banner image

Pages

MANAGERIAL DECISION-MAKING PROFILES: A COMPARISON BETWEEN FEMALES AND MALES
MANAGERIAL DECISION-MAKING PROFILES: A COMPARISON BETWEEN FEMALES AND MALES
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 38-05, Section: A, page: 2907., Thesis (D.B.A.)--The Florida State University, 1977.
MANAGERIAL MOTIVATION OF GOVERNMENT MANAGERS: A COMPARISON OF BUSINESS AND STATE GOVERNMENT MANAGERS USING MINER'S ROLE-MOTIVATION THEORY
MANAGERIAL MOTIVATION OF GOVERNMENT MANAGERS: A COMPARISON OF BUSINESS AND STATE GOVERNMENT MANAGERS USING MINER'S ROLE-MOTIVATION THEORY
A comparative study of managers employed by business and state government organizations was carried out using Miner's role-motivation theory. Miner's motivation theory focuses specifically on those motives appropriate to generalized role requirements of managerial positions in large, highly structured, hierarchic organizations. Those managers having individual motives paralleling the role requirements of these positions are theorized to be more effective in the performance of their jobs. The degree to which individuals possess these motives is determined by the Miner Sentence Completion Scale (MSCS) and is referred to as their "motivation to manage". The rationale in choosing this construct was that (a) it focuses on managerial motivation, (b) its domain is limited to large, bureaucratic organizations, and (c) it has been validated against measures of performance., This study was designed to empirically determine first, what differences exist between government and business managers in terms of their motivation to manage, and second, to what extent are government motivation levels characteristic of those attracted to government organizations as opposed to being organizationally stimulated. MSCS scores were collected from lower- and middle-level state government managers and compared with scores of business managers of similar rank. The MSCS scores of government middle- and lower-level managers were also compared, and each were compared with service time in state government agencies. In addition, MSCS scores from business and public administration graduate students were compared. MSCS scores collected for the study were also checked against respondent demographic variables., Tests of the data show lower- and middle-level state government managers as having overall less motivation to manage. In terms of MSCS subscale scores, the state government profile is one of significantly less desire to compete, less inclination to be assertive and less desire to carry out routine administrative tasks. The lack of significant differences on the remaining subscales suggests that government and business managers are comparable as to their attitude toward those in authority, their desire to direct others and exercise power, and their desire to stand out and be at the center of attention., Tests between lower- and middle-level state government managers failed to yield significant findings eventhough middle-level scores were consistently higher. Similarly, results of tests of the relationship between MSCS scores and service time in state goverment, and between MBA and MSPA students were not significant although MBA scores were consistently higher than MSPA scores., Significant relationships were found between MSCS scores and respondent place of upbringing and/or residence. Here, metro-area scores were consistently highest, and rural lowest., From these tests, it was concluded that (a) the motivation to manage of state government managers is lower than that of business managers, (b) these differences reflect characters of those attracted to government organizations as opposed to being organizationally stimulated, (c) graduate business and public administration students serving as surrogates of future managers reflect the same differences, and (d) motivation to manage levels are related to cultural variables., In addition, implications of these conclusions and recommendations/suggestions for further research are provided., Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 41-05, Section: A, page: 2209., Thesis (D.B.A.)--The Florida State University, 1980.
MANIFEST NEEDS OF MANAGERS: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY WITH A CONTINGENCY APPROACH
MANIFEST NEEDS OF MANAGERS: AN EMPIRICAL STUDY WITH A CONTINGENCY APPROACH
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 40-02, Section: A, page: 0950., Thesis (D.B.A.)--The Florida State University, 1978.
MANIFEST/SUBSTANTIVE CONFLICT IN A SIMULATED MATRIX ORGANIZATION
MANIFEST/SUBSTANTIVE CONFLICT IN A SIMULATED MATRIX ORGANIZATION
This research was meant to fill a gap in the matrix organization conflict literature. First, a model of conflict which established a taxonomy of conflict and integrated the conceptual matrix literature was developed. This model included the antecedent, latent, and manifest variables identified in previous literature. Additionally, the affective and substantive variables were integrated into the taxonomy. Thus, a model which meshed the interpersonal and strategic nature of conflict was detailed. Second, a measure of conflict which approached an appropriate level of scaling was found which equated product manager-functional executive strategy variances. This measure represented the revised plans of managers operating in a stable growth setting which emphasized incremental decision making. Third, a set of individual, organizational, and environmental constructs were proposed as explanatory variables of the strategy variances. Conflict was said to function in relation to risk, the environment, goal/reward system, role orientation, motivation and power balance. Fourth, three industries consisting of matrix organizations were created through the use of the Systems Analysis Research Paradigm. Business policy students were employed as surrogate managers in the simulated setting., The research met with varying degrees of success. First, it was found that risk plays a major role in the conflict between product manager and the functional executive. As such, the innovation that occurs as a result of the vertical and horizontal information flows represents a positive aspect of the matrix structure. Second, the task-environment relationship may provide mixed strategies within the matrix. The various interfaces experienced increasing and decreasing amounts of conflict depending on the nature of the task and the direction of environmental change. Third, the use of an integrative reward system may decrease the degree of conflict in a matrix. Fourth, the type of individuals and their various motivations may affect the amount of conflict in a matrix. Fifth, the locus of decision may interact with the task to produce more or less conflict., Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 42-10, Section: A, page: 4561., Thesis (D.B.A.)--The Florida State University, 1981.
MANIFOLD FACTORS THAT ARE THE CELL-LIKE IMAGE OF A MANIFOLD
MANIFOLD FACTORS THAT ARE THE CELL-LIKE IMAGE OF A MANIFOLD
F. Waldhausen defines a k-fold end structure on a space X to be an ordered k-tuple of continuous maps xj :X(--->)R('+), 1 (LESSTHEQ) j (LESSTHEQ) k (where R('+) is the euclidean half line) yielding a map x:X(--->)(R)('k). The pairs (X,x) are made into the category E('k) of spaces with k-fold end structure. Attachments and expansions in E('k) are defined by induction on k, where elementary attachments and expansions in E('0) have their usual meaning. For Z (epsilon) E('k), the category E('k)/Z consists of pairs (X,i) where i:Z(--->)X is an inclusion in E('k) such that there exists an attachment from i(z) to X. And E('k)//Z is the category whose objects are triples (X,i,r) with (X,i) (epsilon) E('k)/z and r:X(--->)Z a retraction. An infinite complex over Z is a sequence of inclusions in E('k)//Z, X = {X(,1))(Y,y) in E('k) can be madebounded with respect to equivalent k-fold end structures x',y' onX,Y respectively. When X (epsilon) S(,1)(R('k)), that fact can be used to extendthe guaranteed deformation X(SQUIGARR)R('k) in E('k) to a proper deformation(')X(SQUIGARR)D('k) where, (DIAGRAM, TABLE OR GRAPHIC OMITTED...PLEASE SEE DAI), is the associated compactification of X. It is shown that after embedding (')X in R('n) for n large enough, and choosing a regular neighborhood (')N of (')X, that ((')N,D('k)) is a proper unknotted ball pair. The result proves, when R('k) is given the natural product k-fold end structure, Waldhausen's group S(,1)(R('k)) = 0. An exact sequence established by M. Petty is applied to show S(,0)(R('k)) is also trivial. As a consequence, we show that when X is a generalized q-manifold (q (GREATERTHEQ) 5) with singular set S(X) a polyhedron, XxR a piecewise-linear (q+1)-manifold, then X is the cell-like image of a manifold., Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 43-12, Section: B, page: 4012., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1982.
MANIFOLD STRUCTURES ON X X R
MANIFOLD STRUCTURES ON X X R
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 39-11, Section: B, page: 5410., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1978.
MANIPULATION OF FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY IN FUNCTIONAL VOICE DISORDERS BY APPLICATION OF REINFORCEMENT PRINCIPLES
MANIPULATION OF FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY IN FUNCTIONAL VOICE DISORDERS BY APPLICATION OF REINFORCEMENT PRINCIPLES
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 33-02, Section: B, page: 0950., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1969.
MANY-PION PRODUCTION IN POSITIVE PION-DEUTERON REACTIONS AT 15 GEV/C
MANY-PION PRODUCTION IN POSITIVE PION-DEUTERON REACTIONS AT 15 GEV/C
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 41-07, Section: B, page: 2654., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1980.
MAPPING MANAGERIAL ACTIVITIES ONTO ROLES AND AN INVESTIGATION INTO TIME SPENT IN ROLES BY MIDDLE-LEVEL MANAGERS
MAPPING MANAGERIAL ACTIVITIES ONTO ROLES AND AN INVESTIGATION INTO TIME SPENT IN ROLES BY MIDDLE-LEVEL MANAGERS
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 39-03, Section: A, page: 1696., Thesis (D.B.A.)--The Florida State University, 1977.
MAR
MAR
For decades, augmented reality has been used to allow a person to visualize an overlay of annotations, videos, and images on physical objects using a camera. Due to the high computational processing cost that is required to match an image from among an enormous number of images, it has been daunting to use the concept of augmented reality on a smartphone without significant processing delays. Although the Global Positioning System (GPS) can be very useful for the outdoor localization of an object, GPS is not suitable for indoor localization. To address the problem of indoor localization, we propose using mobile augmented reality in an indoor environment. Since most smartphones have many useful sensors such as accelerometers, magnetometers and Wi-Fi sensors, we can leverage these sensors to locate the phone’s location, the phone’s field of view, and the phone’s angle of view. Using Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR) based on processing data from several smartphone sensors, we can achieve indoor localization with reduced processing time. We tested MAR in simulated environments, and deployed the system in the Love building (LOV) at Florida State University. We used 200 images in the simulated environment, and compared the matching processing time between multiple object recognition algorithms and reduced the matching time from 2.8 seconds to only 0.17 second using a brisk algorithm., Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of Computer Science in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester 2017., Date of Defense: April 26, 2017., Keywords: Augmented Reality, Indoor localization, Object Recognition, Smartphone, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Jie Yang, Professor Directing Thesis; Michael Mascagni, Committee Member; Sonia Haiduc, Committee Member.
MARGARET MONTGOMERIE: HER INFLUENCE ON THE LIFE AND WRITING OF JAMES BOSWELL
MARGARET MONTGOMERIE: HER INFLUENCE ON THE LIFE AND WRITING OF JAMES BOSWELL
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 33-06, Section: A, page: 2890., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1971.
MARI SANDOZ, DAUGHTER OF OLD JULES: A STUDY OF HER LIFE AND LITERARY CAREER
MARI SANDOZ, DAUGHTER OF OLD JULES: A STUDY OF HER LIFE AND LITERARY CAREER
Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 01-01, page: 0008., Thesis (M.S.)--The Florida State University, 1956.
MARITAL AND FAMILY POWER IN THE MIRROR OF DECISION-MAKING: AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST OF BLOOD AND WOLFE'S RESOURCE THEORY
MARITAL AND FAMILY POWER IN THE MIRROR OF DECISION-MAKING: AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST OF BLOOD AND WOLFE'S RESOURCE THEORY
The aim of the present research was to experimentally test Blood and Wolfe's resource theory of family power according to which it is the comparative socioeconomic resources rather than tradition that form the bases of conjugal power. The technique used in two studies comprised presenting decision-making situations, in the form of scenarios contained in booklets, to male and female students at Florida State University and examine their perceptions of these situations. The scenarios depicted husbands and wives with comparatively greater, equal, and lesser resources (in terms of their occupational status) engaged in family decision-making., Six decision tasks, including renting an apartment/buying a house, relocation because of a lucrative job offer, purchase of furniture, place of vacation, color preferences for the car to be bought, and TV program to be watched, were used to write the scenarios used in the two studies., Study I addressed the question "what decision-making outcomes would be expected when decision-making situations were presented to subjects in scenarios with no outcomes. The question asked in Study II was what reasons subjects would assign to outcomes in scenarios when they were provided with their outcomes. In addition to writing their responses to scenarios with respect to their outcomes (Study I) and reasons (Study II), subjects also rated the importance of decisions to the couples., The subjects often perceived a spouse with no obvious resources or with comparatively less economic resources as having his/her way on decision-making scenarios presented without their outcomes. They also perceived decision-making process often resulting into compromise and conciliation. Another finding of this research was that subjects perceived the scenarios to vary in importance. In short, the findings of this research lend minimal support to resource theory. According to the subjects' perceptions, such factors as whose domain of interest (husband's or wife's) a decision falls in, consideration for peace in the home, nature of entity involved, and personal qualities and sex roles appeared to be playing a more significant role than socioeconomic resources in patterning marital decision-making., Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 42-06, Section: B, page: 2598., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1981.
MARITAL COMMITMENT: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE NORMATIVE AND INTERPERSONAL DIMENSIONS
MARITAL COMMITMENT: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE NORMATIVE AND INTERPERSONAL DIMENSIONS
The central concern in this research study was marital commitment. It was argued from a social exchange theoretical perspective that marital commitment is composed of two dimensions, normative marital commitment and interpersonal marital commitment. The specific research question looked at how five independent variables (sex, race, socio-economic status, presence or absence of children, and religiosity) were related to differing degrees of normative marital commitment and interpersonal marital commitment., The first step in this research project was to establish a theoretical base from which to draw hypotheses. Because little has been done on marital commitment, theoretically or empirically, the building had to start with a definition of commitment itself. In this study commitment was defined as (1) a decision to follow a course of action and (2) acting on that decision over a period of time. The definition of the other major concepts (marital commitment, normative marital commitment, and interpersonal marital commitment) built around that basic skeleton definition. A discussion of a possible explanation for the forming of marital commitment and its two dimensions begins what is hoped will be a first step in a theoretical model of marital commitment., Ten hypotheses were tested with a survey-type, exploratory, cross-sectional research design. The sample consisted of 188 persons (94 couples). These were drawn from the Florida State University married student housing complex. Individual responses formed the unit of analysis. There was an 89% return rate for the 33-item questionnaire. The instrument used for measuring interpersonal marital commitment and normative marital commitment was a modification of the Clodfelter Marital Commitment Scale., Major conclusions to be drawn from this study include (1) females in this study scored significantly higher than males on the interpersonal marital commitment scale; (2) persons high on religiosity (as measured by attendance at church) scored significantly higher on the normative marital commitment scale than persons who were not high on religiosity; and (3) persons high on religiosity scored significantly lower on the interpersonal marital commitment scale than persons low on religiosity. These conclusions need to be tempered with the fact that this was an exploratory study done with a very homogeneous sample., The contribution this study makes is both theoretical and empirical. Theoretically, a preliminary step is taken toward an explanation of why marital commitment and its two dimensions may occur and the possible consequences of marital commitment., Empirically, the construction of two scales to measure interpersonal marital commitment and normative marital commitment will hopefully provide a springboard for further refinement and elaboration of measuring devices. Also, this study points to sex and religiosity as key variables to consider in any study of marital commitment., Several suggestions are included for further research., Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 41-11, Section: A, page: 4850., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1980.
MARITAL COMPETENCE
MARITAL COMPETENCE
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 28-08, Section: A, page: 3280., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1967.
MARITAL PREPAREDNESS, PREDICTION AND ADJUSTMENT: AN INTER-REGIONAL STUDY OF AMERICAN COLLEGE STUDENTS
MARITAL PREPAREDNESS, PREDICTION AND ADJUSTMENT: AN INTER-REGIONAL STUDY OF AMERICAN COLLEGE STUDENTS
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 26-08, page: 4876., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1965.
MARITAL PROBLEMS AND THE USE OF FORMAL AND INFORMAL NETWORKS
MARITAL PROBLEMS AND THE USE OF FORMAL AND INFORMAL NETWORKS
This study is concerned with the relationship between marital problems and the use of formal and informal networks. A total of 780 problems that were identified with eight different categories were reported by 305 subjects. All of the subjects were employed, married, and had same-race spouses., The purpose of the study is to describe in an exploratory manner the use of social networks, generally, and informal and formal networks, specifically, in discussing marital problems by subject characteristics: informal network involvement, gender, race, presence of children, socioeconomic status, and the subject's rating of problem seriousness. Organizational linkage theory serves as the theoretical reference for the conceptualization and construction of the research questions that are investigated in this study., Forty-eight percent of the reported marital problems are not discussed with anyone. However, 47 percent are discussed with members of informal social network members, and five percent are discussed with formal network members. Problems that are experienced by females and whites are discussed with network members (informal or formal) significantly more frequently than are problems experienced by males and blacks. In addition, problems that are perceived to be more serious are discussed significantly more frequently than are problems perceived to be less serious. Furthermore, there is greater differential use of networks when the problems are perceived to be more serious., Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 45-04, Section: A, page: 1218., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1984.
MARITAL RELATIONSHIPS, FAMILY HARDSHIPS, AND COPING METHODS AMONG PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH CONGENITAL DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES
MARITAL RELATIONSHIPS, FAMILY HARDSHIPS, AND COPING METHODS AMONG PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH CONGENITAL DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES
The two purposes of this study were to provide descriptive data concerning the marital relationships of parents of children with congenital developmental disabilities, the family hardships they face, and the coping methods they use, and to examine the relationships between marital functioning, family hardships, and parental coping methods. Subjects were 32 married couples, each with a developmentally disabled child. Data were collected using a telephone interview, mailed questionnaire package, and personal interviews. Instruments included the Index of Marital Satisfaction, Marital Status Inventory, Problem Checklist, and the Coping Health Inventory for Parents., Over 90% of the marriages had a high degree of stability. Approximately one-third of both husbands and wives reported serious marital dissatisfaction. At least one spouse in over 43% of the couples reported serious marital dissatisfaction. Therefore, most of the marriages were relatively stable and of adequate quality. However, a substantial proportion of the marriages were stable, but of low quality., The most frequently mentioned marital strengths by spouses were (1) companionship, love, and friendship, and (2) commitment to marriage and family orientation. The most common areas of conflict reported were finances and childcare. Approximately one-third of both husbands and wives reported sexual dissatisfaction. Parents indicated that the two areas of marriage most affected by their child's disability were their social life together and the amount of time they were able to be together as a couple. The most common hardships reported by parents were (1) concern about the disabled child's future (2) finances and (3) time with spouse., Multiple regression analysis revealed significant and substantial negative relationships between marital quality and stability and the number of family hardships reported by parents. No significant relationships were found between marital stability and quality and parental use of coping methods., Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 43-07, Section: A, page: 2454., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1982.
MARITAL ROLES AND SOCIAL NETWORKS IN TWO SOCIOECONOMIC GROUPS
MARITAL ROLES AND SOCIAL NETWORKS IN TWO SOCIOECONOMIC GROUPS
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 32-01, Section: A, page: 0563., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1970.
MARITAL SATISFACTION: A VALIDATION APPROACH
MARITAL SATISFACTION: A VALIDATION APPROACH
It was hypothesized that the desire for equity in relationships and the desire for validation from significant others are common human concerns which affect marital relationship satisfaction. Sixty married couples from Colorado Springs, Colorado completed a series of questionnaires which assessed equity in 23 areas of the marital relationship, global equity in the marital relationship, relationship satisfaction, perceptions of relationship stability, understanding from spouse, validation from spouse, assistance from spouse in intellectual and emotional growth, frequency of stimulating conversations between the marital pair, frequency of affectionate touching from spouse and sexual satisfaction in the marital relationship. Personality similarity between spouses was assessed by comparing the degree of similarity between the spouse's personality profiles on the Jackson Personality Inventory. Subjects who felt validated by their spouses reported more relationship satisfaction, greater relationship stability, more assistance from their spouses in intellectual and emotional growth, and greater sexual satisfaction than did subjects who did not feel validated by their spouses. Overall, equitably treated subjects reported more relationship satisfaction, greater relationship stability, more assistance from spouse in emotional growth, greater sexual satisfaction, and a greater frequency of affectionate touching from their spouses than did inequitably treated subjects. However, these differences between equitably treated and inequitably treated subjects applied primarily to non-validated subjects. Personality similarity between spouses was negatively related to relationship satisfaction., Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 42-06, Section: B, page: 2539., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1981.

Pages