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Theses and Dissertations

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Look at My Sky
Look at My Sky
Look at My Sky is a collection of poems that expresses the value of living, the need we have to be heard, loved and understood. These pictures on the inside walls of a moment evoke emotion, celebrate the human spirit, and give voice to things we are afraid to say. These moments live a lifetime in their brief passing, their flight across the sky when they burn brightest; become alive and worth remembering—they are the reasons we think and love and feel and change more than we did before. We become witness to ourselves when ordinary becomes extraordinary, when the moment makes it so., Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of English in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts., Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2003., Date of Defense: April 16, 2003., Keywords: Expresses The Value Of Li, Collection Of Poems, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: David Kirby, Professor Directing Thesis; Andrew Epstein, Committee Member; James Kimbrell, Committee Member.
Looking Outside to Empower within
Looking Outside to Empower within
This dissertation takes as its starting point a recurring problem within the composition classroom: women writers silencing themselves in compliance with patriarchal expectations that frame the good girl role. In the process, these students subordinate, if not entirely erase, their own feminist agency. The disempowerment of women within the writing classroom is especially worrisome given that the NCTE Mission Statement defines one of the main aims of this classroom as helping students use "language to construct personal and public worlds and to achieve full participation in society." If the composition classroom aims to help students develop and practice rhetorical agency, how can this goal be successfully met when women students are implicitly and explicitly taught to adopt a classroom persona of silence? To address the problem of the good girl identity within the composition classroom, I turn to an exploration of feminist agency enacted beyond academia. Women have not – perhaps have never – been completely disempowered or completely silenced. Historically and currently, women have developed innovative and effective ways of performing feminist agency in social spaces beyond the classroom. Accordingly, this dissertation asks, "What strategies for fostering feminist agency in the composition classroom might be derived from the practice of feminist agency deployed outside of the classroom?" To answer this question, I first identify the visual, linguistic, and embodied strategies employed by feminist activists beyond classroom walls. Next, I consider how the activists use these strategies to support enactments of feminist agency within their specific spheres. Finally, I analyze these enactments in order to discern specific strategies we can use for fostering feminist agency within the composition classroom. This dissertation consists of three case study analyses. The first analysis focuses on The Guerrilla Girls, a feminist art activist group. The second examines Here. In My Head, a feminist perzine, and the third considers the feminist music album A Woman's Reprieve. Within each case study, I conduct first-hand interviews with the participants and textual analyses of the activists' work. This analysis of the rhetorical practices of feminist activists has revealed three valuable conclusions regarding feminist agency. 1) Effective feminist agency, understood as action that challenges rather than perpetuates patriarchal ideologies, begins with the personal and circulates beyond the self. 2) Choice, self-determination, action, and audience participation are central tenets to effective enactments of feminist agency. 3) One overarching goal of feminist activists is to promote a more inclusive reality, one that values women and their experiences/perspectives within the public sphere. These conclusions call on us to consider fascinating avenues through which we might foster feminist agency within the composition classroom. Specifically, my study proposes that we can foster feminist agency within the classroom by emphasizing its personal, active, public, and collaborative characteristics, and I offer specific pedagogical means for doing so., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of English in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Summer Semester 2015., Date of Defense: June 2, 2015., Keywords: composition, feminism, feminist activism, feminist agency, pedagogy, rhetoric, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Kristie Fleckenstein, Professor Directing Dissertation; Pat Villeneuve, University Representative; Kathleen Blake Yancey, Committee Member; Linda Saladin-Adams, Committee Member.
Looking for the Perfect Blueberry Pancake
Looking for the Perfect Blueberry Pancake
Looking for the Perfect Blueberry Pancake is the fictional story of John Smith--an ex-cook depressed with the superficiality of his ninety-hour-per-week job managing a high-end cigar bar and disenchanted with what he thought would be a perfect romance--who flees Denver hoping to reach the comfort of his sister's home and tiny cafe on the Gulf. He's hit with a snowstorm in the middle of the night, and he feels sorry for and picks up Ed MacGuffin, a hitchhiking murderer on the lam who is in search of a recipe for the perfect blueberry pancake. John's pickup breaks down in the snowstorm and leaves the two on foot, and John and Ed are thrown into a bizarre and sometimes violent trek across half the country. When they meet Sam, a moving-truck driver, and Gavin, Sam's loader, John begins to fall in love with Sam, and Sam's sexual ambiguity forces John to try to come to terms with himself and his pop-culture-driven expectations. All along the way, John learns about Ed, Sam, himself, and the dangers of believing anything can be perfect., Submitted Note: A Thesis Submitted to the Department of English in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2006., Date of Defense: November 6, 2006., Keywords: blueberry, pancake, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: Virgil Suárez, Professor Directing Thesis; James Kimbrell, Committee Member; Elizabeth Stuckey-French, Committee Member.
Looking through Trees, Finding Squirrels
Looking through Trees, Finding Squirrels
The purpose of this dissertation is to ascertain, explore, and document how music and dance have been used as a means and method of healing, survival, and celebration in Native American communities. This work does not focus solely upon one Nation or tribe of Native American peoples but instead incorporates participants’ voices from a Pan-Native population. Drawing from my analysis of the historical legacy of U.S.-supported and funded American Indian boarding schools, ethnographic interviews, participation in collaborative ethnography, and audiovisual documentation of performances and conversations, I examine how Native American musicians, dancers, and healers define and re-define their identities to both their local Indigenous communities and an expanding worldwide audience. Furthermore, I discuss how Native American communities affected by the legacies of traumas have, in turn, created hidden cultural and personal transcripts that shape how they conceive and perceive their voice and place amidst the dominant society. I explore how musics, songs, and dances have opened a pathway for reconnection to ̶ and a redefinition of ̶ core cultural and spiritual beliefs that have been forgotten or withheld by choice or force due to social policies or historical constructs of control. This research thus investigates how musics, songs, and dances have played and continue to play a role in re-awakening Native American identity by giving sovereignty of voice to those who, for generations, have experienced oppression as the underlying foundation of their daily existence. This work contains three audio music examples. “Where Eagles Fly” is an unpublished, self-recorded song by Suze Vander Laan Bone shared with the author during online interview discussions with the musician/artist. The song was intended to be used in conjunction with Vander Laan Bone’s currently unpublished screenplay Detours. “Toosh toosh” is a healing song shared with the author during an interview session with Donald White that he used to sing to calm those suffering from anxiety and sadness. “Losh’ga” is a song shared with the author during an interview session with Dr. Nicky Michael that she used to sing to her brother when he was hospitalized., A Dissertation submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., November 16, 2020., American Indian boarding schools, dance, hidden transcripts, intergenerational trauma, music and healing, Native American, Includes bibliographical references., Frank D. Gunderson, Professor Directing Dissertation; Andrew Frank, University Representative; Charles E. Brewer, Committee Member; Michael Bakan, Committee Member.
Loosh
Loosh
This novel attempts to marry the aesthetics of grit lit with the elements of noir crime-novels and -films. Set against the backdrop of one of our country's first Civil Rights demonstrations—the Biloxi beach wade-in, Easter 1959—this historical fiction dramatizes the protests and subsequent riots. However, it also adds a twist: a plot that reveals that the burning of the historically black part of the city was far more heinous than just racism. In fact, the white supremacists in this novel are also exploited into action by powers greater yet more sinister and silent than their simple, racist hearts could imagine. Loosh, the black community and its leaders, the police department, the New Orleans Mafia, the local government, and HUD all have their own stories here, which are in turn both noble and selfish. Further, they all exist within a much larger plot, and all will eventually be caught up in its web and used beyond their reckoning. And in the end, only Loosh will have the chance to make things right., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of English in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2009., Date of Defense: December 1, 2008., Keywords: Mississippi, Civil Rights, Noir, Historica, l Dixie Mafia, Mafia, Crime, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Robert Olen Butler, Professor Directing Dissertation; Elna Green, Outside Committee Member; David Kirby, Committee Member; Virgil Suarez, Committee Member.
Lord Has Led Me, and He Will Lead You
Lord Has Led Me, and He Will Lead You
This thesis considers the role that gospel music played in the culture of early to mid-twentieth century Chicago. In order to better understand why the popularity of gospel music increased dramatically in the first half of the century, this paper looks at a number of Thomas Andrew Dorsey's songs. Dorsey's lyrics discussed life's difficulties and acknowledged pain and suffering, while at the same time offering hope for a better future through God. By understanding the social conditions of Chicago at this time, it becomes clear why these themes were appealing to Chicagoans of all backgrounds. In addition to impacting individuals' lives, gospel also affected Chicago's culture by uniting disparate groups by fostering compassion and negotiating racial tension through its performance at outdoor music festivals. The widespread appeal of these songs also worked to humanize the suffering and hope of African Americans. By relating to these songs, people of all backgrounds were also relating to the experience of African Americans, which fostered a compassionate understanding among whites and blacks. Furthermore, performances of gospel music at festivals brought migrants, old settlers, and whites together, literally and figuratively, by opening the events to people of all races and by emphasizing the similarities of attendees' American and Protestant identities. Catherine Bell's theory of ritual in her work Ritual Theory, Ritual Practice also helps make sense of how these festivals united Chicagoans by explaining how the performance of gospel music allowed people of various backgrounds to become involved in the formation of a new, more interracial Chicago culture., Submitted Note: A Thesis Submitted to the Department of Religion in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2008., Date of Defense: December 18, 2007., Keywords: Gospel Music, Great Migration, Chicago, Thomas Andrew Dorsey, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: Amanda Porterfield, Professor Directing Thesis; John Corrigan, Committee Member; Amy Koehlinger, Committee Member.
Lord Is Easy to Please
Lord Is Easy to Please
In The Lord is Easy to Please I hope to convey the intimate tension between the various speakers' sacrilegious thoughts and her loss and longing. Aesthetically, I consciously avoid imposing a bias toward faith or faithlessness and often employ the speaker in a more journalistic setting, placing more value on the ethereal images and experiences of the narrative as opposed to the speaker's abstract interpretation of what she witnesses. For example, the female speaker in title poem, 'The Lord is Easy to Please,' reflects on the first time she became suspicious of Catholicism by pointing out a nun's gun collection used for hunting and her mother, while drunk, signing the words of the Janis Joplin song, 'Oh Lord Won't You Buy Me A Mercedes Benz.' This aesthetic approach is modeled after poet Carolyn Forche, who, while keeping distance from her subjects, rarely imposes emotion or opinion onto her characters. Thematically, the poems in this dissertation maintain the figurative motif of God as a flawed, earthly being disassembling him as judgmental higher power and playing off the concept of forgiveness. The poem Song for Sinners begs the question, 'What is the price in the bartering of sex and dreams?' Though questions such as this remain unanswered, they underhandedly imply an absurdity to the concept of asking for forgiveness unrepentingly, then being forgiven. Subtle allusions are also made to Dante's hierarchical nine circles of hell though the sins of my characters are quickly pardoned by creating a landscape in which angels and gods are equally sinful. The poem On Infidelity claims, in reference to angels, 'They are just as hopeless. They don't haunt abandoned ships. They graffiti trains and fuck drunk gods. They tremble in their bones.' The poem concludes also that there is more than one god and if he isn't willing to forgive, he'll find a different god to forgive you. Emphasizing the presence of multiple gods, some more casual than others and each with his own set of punishments for sin, is not meant to distinguish the notion of faith so much as to create a larger, forgivable space for human error. The sub-theme of forgiving oneself for human error is typically exploited by invented scenarios in which mistakes have positive results. These sorts of poems tend to be a bit more confessional than the others, as in the poem, 'The Dying Gull' in which the speaker contemplates rescuing a dying bird but elects not to. Observing from the safe distance of a window, she watches it suffer with little remorse. Then, to her surprise, another bird magically swoops in and carries the dying bird away. The overall intention of this dissertation was to focus on the positive results of selflessness and forgiveness inclusive of its biblical context and by doing so I consciously attempted to avoid narcissistic, personal experiences and searched for topics that relied less on cognitive states of consciousness and more on judicious observations of others., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of English in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2011., Date of Defense: February 11, 2011., Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: David Kirby, Professor Directing Dissertation; Barbara Hamby, Committee Member; Mark Pietralunga, University Representative; Erin Belieu, Committee Member.
Lord, Why Did You Make Me a Black Woman?
Lord, Why Did You Make Me a Black Woman?
The representation of Black women in senior leadership positions within higher education hovers at a dismal 5.8% (Wilder et al., 2013). Though Black women's degree attainment has increased substantially in comparison to other racial groups (NCES, n.d.), they are not recruited and supported in these roles (Jackson & Harris, 2007), especially in both Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Historically White Institutions. Consequently, the women who are successful in obtaining administrative and executive positions share experiences that illuminate a system still plagued with sexism and racism (Cooper, 2020). Using Black Feminist Thought, Intersectionality, and Misogynoir as frameworks, as well as a critical narrative inquiry, I explored the intersection of race and gender for Black women in senior-level leadership roles at HBCUs and HWIs., A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., November 8, 2022., Black women, gender, higher education, race, senior-level leadership, Includes bibliographical references., Cameron Beatty, Professor Directing Dissertation; Rhea Lathan, University Representative; Tamara Bertrand Jones, Committee Member; Ayesha Khurshid, Committee Member.
Losing Home
Losing Home
Land use in Florida has seen many changes since it became an American territory in 1821. But while land use can be a categorical term for classifying property, it can also take on a more valuable meaning. When the land was originally opened up for frontier settlers and wealthy planters to farm in the early years, it usually meant family and freedom as individuals and large kinship networks migrated south to establish homesteads and plantations. This population was mostly concentrated in Middle Florida or the northern part of the state. Leading up to the Civil War, cotton was obviously a royal crop and a manufacturing movement emerged to support the momentum toward Southern independence. However, the aftermath of the Civil War seems to be a turning point for the dominantly agrarian region as timber, railroads, and tourism changed the way residents used the land. While Northwest Florida retained agriculture as a major part of the economy, the peninsula became more developed and populated, mostly with wealthy Northern tourists, and in effect, the state transformed into two distinct regions with very different environments and cultures. Comparisons between the two sections are made throughout the study to illustrate lessons that can be learned from one to the other. Sprawl, congestion, and overdevelopment's assault on the environment are common concerns. My focus for this study is to show how land use and essentially rural life changed for those individuals who were accustomed to subsistence farming in Northwest Florida. Land prices, a decline in farm acreage, population distribution, and suburbanization exhibit this transformation. In addition, the intention is to show the assets of the Panhandle through its environment, rural character, and agrarian heritage which equates into a revered quality of life. The rural places of Northwest Florida deserve protection from inappropriate and misplaced development using rural land conservation and land-use planning techniques while revitalizing towns and cities that have already been developed and preserving the region's vast historical resources for future generations., Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the American and Florida Studies Program in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2013., Date of Defense: April 1, 2013., Keywords: Agrarian, Conservation, Development, Growth Management, Panhandle, Rural, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Neil Jumonville, Professor Directing Thesis; Frederick Davis, Committee Member; Jennifer Koslow, Committee Member.
Lost Commodore
Lost Commodore
This dissertation is a collection of ten short stories. All are works of fiction composed by the author during the years 2004-2006 when he was a student in the Creative Writing PhD program at Florida State University., Submitted Note: A Dissertation Submitted to the Department of English in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2006., Date of Defense: March 21, 2006., Keywords: Fiction, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: Mark Winegardner, Professor Directing Dissertation; Roberto Fernández, Outside Committee Member; Julianna Baggott, Committee Member; Barry Faulk, Committee Member.
Lost Neighborhoods of Newest York
Lost Neighborhoods of Newest York
This thesis is a novel. It is the story of Frank, a pickpocket who moonlights as a children's magician. He falls in love with Nasya who is a volunteer at a hospice for children with horrible and strange diseases. The book follows their relationships as well as the people around them and the city in which they live., Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of English in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Fine Arts., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2009., Date of Defense: September 28, 2009., Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Robert Olen Butler, Professor Directing Thesis; Diane Roberts, Committee Member; S.E. Gontarski, Committee Member.
Lost in the Labyrinthine Library
Lost in the Labyrinthine Library
Wayfinding is the method by which humans orient and navigate in space, and particularly in built environments such as cities and complex buildings, including public libraries. In order to wayfind successfully in the built environment, humans need information provided by wayfinding systems and tools, for instance architectural cues, signs, and maps. This is true of all built environments, including public libraries, but the issue is all the more important in public libraries where users already enter with information needs and possibly anxiety, which may interfere with their ability to wayfind successfully. To facilitate user wayfinding, which in turn facilitates user information seeking, public library facilities need to be designed with consideration of users' wayfinding needs, along with their information-seeking and other library-specific needs. The public library facility design literature identifies the importance of understanding user wayfinding behavior and designing around it, and this dissertation is a step toward answering that call. A single-method pilot study utilized unobtrusive observation to investigate library users' initial wayfinding behavior from the two entrances of a medium-sized public library, with the data analyzed and displayed using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software (Mandel, 2010). The pilot study found certain routes to be more popular than others and suggested that such information could be gathered relatively easily and then used by the library to improve the library's wayfinding system and for marketing of library materials in high-traffic areas. However, the pilot study's largest limitation, namely the inability to ascertain any user opinions regarding their wayfinding in the library, indicated the need for a multi-method case study approach, replicating the original unobtrusive observation and adding document review of the Library's wayfinding tools such as maps and signage, intensive interviews with library users, and an expert review of findings with library staff and a library wayfinding and signage expert to gain a more comprehensive view of library user wayfinding behavior. This dissertation follows a multi-method case study research design, guided by Passini's Conceptual Framework of Wayfinding, to investigate library user wayfinding behavior from the entrance of a medium-sized public library facility. The case study design includes unobtrusive observation of library user wayfinding behavior, document review of the library's wayfinding tools, intensive interviews with library users to discuss their views on wayfinding in public libraries, and an expert review of findings with library staff and a library wayfinding and signage expert to test the validity of research findings. The researcher chose the case study design to guide this dissertation because of the ability to analyze data gathered from different methods, thereby mitigating the limitations of a single-method dissertation, strengthening the overall findings, and providing a more comprehensive view of library user wayfinding behavior than could be obtained from a single-method approach. The dissertation finds that users' wayfinding behavior is generally inconsistent over time as far as segments used to connect two given nodes, although high-traffic areas do show consistency of traffic levels. Also, of people connecting the same two nodes, some were very consistent in using the predominant segment (the one used most frequently) or other connecting segments used multiple times, but the behavior of other wayfinders was inconsistent with the majority in that they used unpopular segments to connect the two nodes. There also seems to be discrepancy between the segments and routes users are observed to utilize and those they say they utilize in navigating the entry area. Reasons for this discrepancy are unknown, but one possibility is interviewees' general difficulty in describing their entry area routes because of challenges in recalling their past behavior. Overall, it seems that users of the research site employ Passini's wayfinding styles more often than his wayfinding strategies, and two of the strategies were neither noted during unobtrusive observation nor mentioned during interviews. A possible reason for this lies in the difficulties in observing and articulating cognitive processes. Finally, although many users seem to struggle wayfinding in the library serving as research site, that does not seem to translate into recommended changes to improve this library's wayfinding system as interviewees were unlikely to indicate that any changes are needed, even after they had indicated struggling to wayfind in the facility. Ultimately, this research concludes that user wayfinding behavior in the research site is variant to some degree, but the degree to which that is so or why that is so remain unexplored. About half of observed users navigated via segments that other users also navigated, but the other half navigated via segments that they alone navigated. There does not appear to be any degree of consistency over time other than to say that user wayfinding behavior in this research site is consistently inconsistent. Additional research is necessary to compare this with user wayfinding behavior in other libraries and information organizations. Also, this research concludes that a significant amount of work remains to be done with regard to Passini's Conceptual Framework of Wayfinding (1981). This framework holds potential for explaining user wayfinding behavior, but additional research is necessary to investigate more fully the degree to which the styles and strategies are valid descriptors of how users wayfind., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the School of Library & Information Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2012., Date of Defense: January 30, 2012., Keywords: observation, public libraries, spatial behavior, user studies, wayfinding, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Melissa Gross, Professor Directing Dissertation; Stephen D. McDowell, University Representative; Charles R. McClure, Committee Member; Lorraine M. Mon, Committee Member.
Lost in the Long March
Lost in the Long March
When news of the most recent Kuomingtang invasion arrived, Ping and the other platoon members were more interested in its carrier, a new comrade that would join their unit--a girl this time--named Yong. She had transferred to Iron Well Mountain from Ruijin, the administrative capital, by her own request, and because she had fought in the shorthanded eastern divisions during the second and third encirclement campaigns, the politburo had decided to place her with a combat unit instead of the medical or propaganda detachments. She wanted to be here at Iron Well and defend the birthplace of the revolution. She was honored, she told the platoon, to fight with those who'd been with General Mao the longest. At first, Ping couldn't tell if her words were merely meant to sound charming. Nearly all the soldiers had been bandits or prisoners, and they cared about the communist ideals about as much as they did their body odor. Ping was a gunsmith. Back in Canton, he'd also been a gangster, someone who traded a week's work for a night with a perfumed courtesan. He'd shove his way into the brightest building on the street, throw a rifle to the cashier as payment, and ask the lady of the house, "Take me to your finest!", Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of English in partial fulfillment of the Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2015., Date of Defense: February 27, 2015., Keywords: Fiction, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Elizabeth Stuckey-French, Professor Directing Dissertation; Thomas Joiner, University Representative; Helen Burke, Committee Member; Mark Winegardner, Committee Member; Ned Stuckey-French, Committee Member.
Louis J. Witte
Louis J. Witte
Louis John Witte is a man whose name is lost to time and whose work is overshadowed by flashier modern-day computerized advancements in movie wizardry. Nevertheless, he remains a cornerstone upon which a thriving scientific discipline has been built. Although he and his creations existed well before the advent of computer technology, he is credited with inventing devices that advanced the art of faking realism by replacing state-of-the-art crude facsimiles and dangerous replications with safer, hyper-realistic models. Witte's inventions erased the boundary separating audiences from the bona fide. His contribution to the science of entertainment coincided with the historic period 1896-1946, in which "movies were the most popular and influential medium of culture in the United States" (Sklar 3). Not only did Witte give his valuable civilian expertise to his country, but he also was a veteran of WWI, when during a "long lonely and dangerous mission," he was wounded (Leavell Appendix II). "Sergeant Louis J. Witte," a telegram written to his mother reads, "was wound [sic] in the Meuse-Argonne operation, on the night of Oct. 2nd., 1918, by an air bomb, and was evacuated to the hospital" (Leavell Appendix II). Witte's service and injury earned him the Purple Heart commendation for his involvement in that battle., Submitted Note: A Thesis Submitted to the Department of Humanities (American Studies Program) in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2011., Date of Defense: January 31, 2011., Keywords: Special Effects, Film Industry, Twentieth Century Fox Films, Film Industry, Flare Machine Patent, Wave Machine Patent, Sound Machine Patent, Witte, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: John Fenstermaker, Professor Directing Thesis; Dennis Moore, Committee Member; Timothy Parrish, Committee Member.
Louis Moreau Gottschalk, John Sullivan Dwight, and the Development of Musical Culture          in the United States, 1853-1865
Louis Moreau Gottschalk, John Sullivan Dwight, and the Development of Musical Culture in the United States, 1853-1865
This dissertation investigates the relationships between the lives and works of Louis Moreau Gottschalk (1829-69) and John Sullivan Dwight (1813-93). It demonstrates that the points of intersection were influenced not only by musical concerns – composition, performance, and criticism – but also by larger social and cultural issues that shaped mid-nineteenth-century America, including race, religion, politics, and philosophy. A broader goal of this project is to gain a fuller understanding of the culture of America at mid-century and most specifically of its musical life. This was a crucial time for the formation of the musical styles and tastes that prepared the way for the current conditions of American musical culture. The final purpose of this dissertation is to reveal the far-reaching influence of the connections explored here. Through the combination of social and cultural research, style analysis, and reception history, I demonstrate that the music composed and performed by Louis Moreau Gottschalk and the critical writings of John Sullivan Dwight were shaped by a variety of social forces, including the cult of virtuosity, blackface minstrelsy, exoticism, nationalism, sentimentalism, and New England Transcendentalism. The effects of the careers of Dwight and Gottschalk can still be felt in the ways music is seen, heard, and performed in America. The two men were connected within a web of cultural intersections that thrives in the diversity of American music today., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2007., Date of Defense: Date of Defense: October 26, 2007., Keywords: Musical Aesthetics, Hegelian Dialectic, Sentimentalism, Cult Of Virtuosity, Blackface Minstrelsy, Music Criticism, Exoticism, Nationalism, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: Denise Von Glahn, Professor Directing Dissertation; Matthew Shaftel, Outside Committee Member; Douglass Seaton, Committee Member.
Louis Slobodkin
Louis Slobodkin
"To encourage children to read with pleasure one approach may be to include works of humor among the selections. This requires a knowledge, on the part of the selector, of children's authors who are outstanding in presenting humor on a child's level of understanding. In this field one of the most successful is Louis Slobodkin, who has both written and illustrated children's books. Consideration of these works is the purpose of this paper, which presents the life of Slobodkin with emphasis on his development as an illustrator: reviews and summarizes the critic's opinion of the seventeen books that he has contributed to children's literature, and gives a bibliography of his works"--Introduction., Typescript., "August, 1957.", "Submitted to the Graduate Council of Florida State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science.", Advisor: Ruth H. Rockwood, Professor Directing Paper., Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references (leaves 42-47).
Louis-Thomas Villaret de Joyeuse
Louis-Thomas Villaret de Joyeuse
Louis-Thomas Villaret de Joyeuse was one of the most important admirals of the French Republic and an important colonial administrator under Napoléon Bonaparte. Born in 1747 in Auch, he entered the navy in 1765. Slowly rising through the ranks of the officiers bleus, his career was accelerated by the War of the American Revolution. Serving under Admiral Pierre-Andre Suffren, he was promoted into the regular officer corps. The outbreak of the French Revolution opened vast opportunities to him, allowing him to rise to the rank of vice-admiral in just a few years. As a junior officer, he served in Saint-Domingue in 1791-1792 and blockaded the Vendéan coast in 1793. As commander of the Brest fleet in 1794-1796, he participated in several of the most important naval operations during the French Revolutionary Wars, including the infamous Battle of 13 Prairial or Glorious First of June. As a member of the Council of Five Hundred in the Directory government in 1797, Villaret de Joyeuse was heavily involved in the political debates concerning Saint Domingue and the other French colonies. While he was exiled due to the Coup d'état of 18 Fructidor, he was exonerated by Napoléon. Returned to his command of the Brest fleet, he transported Leclerc's expedition to Saint-Domingue in 1801. After his return to France, he became capitaine-général of Martinque in 1802. Faced with the threat of British invasion and a black population animated by the Haitian Revolution, he maintained control of the island until 1809. Although never found guilty in a court martial, Napoléon's ire kept him unemployed until Napoléon named him governor of Venice in 1811. Villaret de Joyeuse's tenure in Venice was cut short by his death in July 1812. This dissertation examines Villaret de Joyeuse's life and career in both the French navy and Napoléon's colonial administration in the Caribbean., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of History in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2006., Date of Defense: May 17, 2006., Keywords: Napoleonic Wars, French Revolution, French navy, Martinique, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Donald Horward, Professor Directing Thesis; Mohammed Kabbaj, Outside Committee Member; Michael Creswell, Committee Member; Jonathan Grant, Committee Member; Matt Childs, Committee Member.
Louisa S. Mccord and the "Feminist" Debate
Louisa S. Mccord and the "Feminist" Debate
Who was Louisa S. McCord as a writer and polemicist on women's rights in the antebellum South? Why did she, a conservative intellectual, use the term 'feminist' in 1852? Historians of the nineteenth century Woman's Rights Movement have paid McCord little attention because of her geographic location'she lived in South Carolina'and her conservative opinions. Her attitudes, which were conventional for her era, put her outside the interest of women's studies until recently. This dissertation provides a new analysis of Louisa S. McCord's work and argues the historical significance of her ideas about the Woman's Rights Movement of the nineteenth century. Furthermore, this dissertation is particularly interested in McCord's use of the word 'feminist.' In the course of critiquing female reformer Elizabeth Oakes Smith, McCord may have been the first person to use the term 'feminist' in print. This study adds to the collective knowledge of women's history by shining a light on the impact of McCord's ideas. This study is an interdisciplinary one, utilizing both sociology and women's history in studying the social system of the antebellum South. This dissertation examines the gendered aspects of the South's social class structure by analyzing McCord's published essays on women's rights. An analysis of non-fiction nineteenth-century periodical literature provided the foundational sources for this work. In addition, letters and legal documents gave insight into the personal life of this intriguing woman., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Program of Interdisciplinary Humanities in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2011., Date of Defense: June 8, 2011., Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Maxine D. Jones, Professor Directing Dissertation; Maxine Montgomery, University Representative; Jennifer Koslow, Committee Member; Charles Upchurch, Committee Member.
Louise Farrenc's Trio for Flute, Cello and Piano
Louise Farrenc's Trio for Flute, Cello and Piano
Many flutists believe that the romantic period saw a decline in music for their instrument. One purpose of this document is to republish Louise Farrenc's Trio in E minor for Flute, Cello and Piano, Op. 45 in an attempt to add quality literature to the repertoire of nineteenth century flute music. In the most recent edition, the score has been reproduced more legibly, corrections have been made to inconsistencies harmonically, articulations and phrasing has been more idiomatically constructed, and the notation made more contemporary. Prior to the completion of this treatise, the composition has been republished with an introduction by the author of this document. Additionally, in recent years, there has been an increase in the interest of the music of female composers and with it, the work of the romantic composer Louise Farrenc. Accompanying the musical score is a biography and critical analysis that will bring familiarity to a composer whose works have fallen from popularity, perhaps not due to the quality of her work but from the gender discrimination that existed during her lifetime. The first chapter of the document includes comprehensive biographical, historical, and cultural information from historical sources. Also included is information pertinent to this performance document through research of the personal correspondence and criticism contemporary to Louise Farrenc. The second chapter is a comprehensive analysis of the work including musical examples. The third chapter is a retrospective view of Louise Farrenc and the significance of the republication. A critical edition of the score of the trio will be Appendix A. This document will serve as a source of information that the reader may use to become acquainted with Farrenc's compositions and chamber music. It will also serve as an extensive compendium to the author's introduction of the republished work and will assist research into other works of nineteenth century chamber music and the music of female composers of this era., Submitted Note: A Treatise Submitted to the College of Music in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Music., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2005., Date of Defense: October 31, 2005., Keywords: Analysis, Critical Edition, Composers, Women Composer, Female Composer, Chamber Music, Music, Nineteenth Century, Louise, Farrenc, Trio, Flute, Cello, Piano, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: Jeff Keesecker, Professor Directing Treatise; André Thomas, Outside Committee Member; Patrick Meighan, Committee Member; Evan Allan Jones, Committee Member.
Love Song to the Demon-Possessed Pigs of Gadara
Love Song to the Demon-Possessed Pigs of Gadara
In this manuscript, I explore issues of masculinity, mental illness, and spirituality—often using the form of elegy. Many of the elegies in this manuscript are in conversation with critic Jahan Ramazani's arguments about elegies: "the modern elegist tends not to achieve but to resist consolation, not to override but to sustain anger, not to heal but to reopen the wounds of loss." The arc of the book shows the speaker working through grief, healing from loss, and confronting mental illness. The poems of healing interrogate that "wound of loss" Ramazani describes, while detailing the inherent difficulty of opening or closing the wound. The book is structured in four sections, with each section having the central threads braided throughout. Each braid connects back to—and is filtered through—the speaker: his struggle with God, his constant conflicts with the father figure, his romantic relationships, and his own crumbling mental health. In addition to these recurring themes, I attempt to explore the distances between two people (or figures), in either a literal way, or through memory. In reckoning with those distances, the focus of exploration twists inward: the poems about other people become about the speaker. The knowledge gained from the focus inward becomes become holes in the speaker's perceived identity that the poems must then work their way out of. Several of my poems are influenced by a strained relationship with an emotionally and physically abusive father. This father figure informs my speaker's sense of masculinity through notions of power and love, which becomes mirrored in the speaker's tenuous relationship toward God throughout the manuscript. In the poems that deal directly with family, I write in the tradition of such contemporary poets as Sharon Olds. However, many of the poems in this manuscript don't glorify the body and the sensuous relationship a person can have with their body, as many of Olds' poems do. Instead, many poems look at the way the body breaks down and is impacted through chronic illness, inherited conditions, aging, and ultimately, death. Many of the poems in this manuscript filter claustrophobic human experiences and interactions through the self, attempting to navigate new knowledge that fractures one's understanding of the world. My speaker's encounters with intimacy tend to reveal the erotic to be just as claustrophobic as the self. The poems dealing with intimacy are written in the tradition of such poets as Robert Creeley (with his unresolved desire of his idealized lover) and Richard Siken (with his attempts to revive and reanimate the dead lover in Crush). Several poems attempt to reconstruct memories and fail, thereby giving the reader the sense that the speaker is always already aware that memories—even traumatic or closely held memories—degrade over time. The end of the manuscript shows the speaker working toward recovery from his mental illness, but it doesn't present that healing process in an unrealistic way, knowing that the healing process is never complete. Rather, the ending shows the speaker struggling to move forward, but moving forward nonetheless., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of English in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Summer Semester 2019., Date of Defense: July 9, 2019., Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: James Kimbrell, Professor Directing Dissertation; Juan Carlos Galeano, University Representative; Andrew Epstein, Committee Member; Barbara Hamby, Committee Member; David Kirby, Committee Member.

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