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Lone Ranger Dines Again
Lone Ranger Dines Again
This collection of poems, The Lone Ranger Dines Again, is divided into three sections: "Million Dollar Wallpaper," a series of miscellaneous poems ranging in topic from a Colombian drug lord to instructions for playing baseball like a girl; "Six Gun's Legacy," a series of poems centered on childhood; and "The Return of the Convict," a series of poems concerning adulthood in its clumsy infancy. The titles of these sections are derived from episodes of The Lone Ranger television program. The goal of The Lone Ranger Dines Again is to mix pop culture, personal experience, and wry observation of everyday life into a frothy, rhythmic, and accessible concoction, Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of English in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts., Degree Awarded: Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2005., Date of Defense: Date of Defense: February 25, 2005., Keywords: Poetry, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: David Kirby, Professor Directing Thesis; James Kimbrell, Committee Member; Erin Belieu, Committee Member.
Lone-Insider Boards
Lone-Insider Boards
The 1990s included a renewed emphasis on board independence. Allegedly, the greater the proportion of independent outside directors, the more effective the board is at monitoring CEOs. I assert in this dissertation that there are limits to board independence. Specifically, when a chief executive officer (CEO) is the only inside board member, which I call a lone-insider board, a critical source of information and mutual monitoring by other inside directors is lost. Increased information asymmetry and loss of mutual monitoring gives CEOs more freedom to influence organizational outcomes toward their personal preferences and in conflict with shareholders' interests. Contrary to expectations, results indicate lone-insider boards are fulfilling their fiduciary responsibilities in the area of executive compensation. However, lone-insider boards need to limit CEO duality as well as encourage long-term strategies such as research and development investment. This study also found that blockholders are somewhat detrimental in lone-insider boards, because they increase total CEO compensation and compensation differentials on the top management team. Duality is also more common when blockholders are present. Finally, as lone-insider boards increase in size, they generally lose their effectiveness. Duality is more common in larger lone-insider boards, and two of the three measures of executive compensation are greater., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Management in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2008., Date of Defense: June 13, 2008., Keywords: Corporate Governance Financial Controls, Board Composition, Duality, Executive Compensation, Agency Theory, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: James G. Combs, Professor Directing Dissertation; Michael K. Brady, Outside Committee Member; Bruce T. Lamont, Committee Member; Jack T. Fiorito, Committee Member; Timothy R. Holcomb, Committee Member.
Loneliest Sea Monster and Other Curiosities Stories
Loneliest Sea Monster and Other Curiosities Stories
Collection of short stories., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of English in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor or Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2015., Date of Defense: March 20, 2015., Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Elizabeth Stuckey-French, Professor Directing Dissertation; Thomas Joiner, University Representative; Diane Roberts, Committee Member; David Kirby, Committee Member; Jennine Capó Crucet, Committee Member.
Lonely Whistle, Dying Light
Lonely Whistle, Dying Light
This novel follows T-Mark and a cast of contemporary train hoppers who congregate in Gainesville, Florida. From the beginning of the narrative, T-Mark is haunted by a fatal accident he witnesses, and one of the people killed by the train starts to speak to him in his dreams and then eventually confronts him in waking life. Other supernatural elements set a tone of otherworldliness against an otherwise realistic and rooted setting, guiding the reader to question T-Mark and his blurred conception of real versus perceived. Perspectives from other characters help interrogate and complicate this further. While we witness T-Mark navigate this chosen lifestyle, the novel also then partially acts as an extended study of mental health, privilege, and subculture., A Thesis submitted to the Department of English in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Fine Arts., April 2, 2020., Fiction, Novel, Includes bibliographical references., Ravi Howard, Professor Directing Thesis; Bruce Horack, Committee Member; Barbara Hamby, Committee Member.
Long Goodbye: Raymond Chandler’s novel and Robert Altman’s film
Long Goodbye: Raymond Chandler’s novel and Robert Altman’s film
Abstract: Many of the works which fall into that broad category we call the crime genre, are pot-boilers. Like their cousins in other popular genres (such as the adventure, horror, romance, spy, and western stories), the basic crime situation, the mystery, is popular because of its predictable form. By the end of the narrative, a solution to a crime has been found. But within this enormous body of work, there are some narratives which stretch the limits of their form to intersect with the artistic concerns of their time. Rarely, if ever, does a single work in the crime genre achieve such a feat in two different media. And yet, Raymond Chandler's longest and most complex hard-boiled detective novel, The Long Goodbye, is arguably the apotheosis of its type in fiction, and Robert Altman's film version of the work twenty years later uses Chandler's plot to create something totally different, another detective story which extends the form in completely new and unexpected ways. This study, after a brief survey of the artistic evolution of the crime genre, will examine these two significant works in detail because their duality is so intriguing. Chandler's novel is an engrossing detective mystery and it is a novel with the artistic purposes of this century's Modernist authors. Altman's film is a captivating detective mystery and it is a challenging Post-Modernist cinematic experience. By comparing and contrasting the two versions of The Long Goodbye I intend to demonstrate that it is the hybrid nature of each work which accounts for its enduring appeal., Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 48-07, Section: A, page: 1559., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1987.
Long-Term Change in Hydrology, Tree Growth, and Forest Composition along the          Apalachicola River
Long-Term Change in Hydrology, Tree Growth, and Forest Composition along the Apalachicola River
Recent shifts in the hydrologic regime of the Apalachicola River have been attributed to anthropogenic changes in the watershed, particularly those associated with dam and reservoir construction. To assess the impact of these changes on the forests on the river's floodplain, a two-tiered methodology was applied to a 1-ha forest plot. First, repeat-survey data spanning a 27-year interval was subjected to multivariate analysis for identification of major trends in forest composition. While the changes identified were small, the increased representation of upland tree species on the plot was a potential indication of ecological response to declining river stages. To examine patterns in tree growth in more detail, a dendrochronological approach was used, beginning with the collection of core samples from every species present on the plot. Of these, cores from 4 different species were selected as suitable for analysis. The annual growth increment record from these cores was subjected to correlation and multiple regression analysis with various hydrologic and climatic parameters in an attempt to isolate the primary factors influencing growth. The use of the hydrologic analysis software IHA allowed the development of parameters characterizing the site-specific flooding regime, including parameters approximating annual frequency, average duration, and average timing of inundation events. Finally, intervention detection analysis was used to identify major trends, shifts, and unusual features in the growth record. Growth in all four species was found to correlate most strongly with hydrologic parameters, particularly with the site-specific parameters generated by IHA. Regression models developed primarily from hydrologic parameters were successful in accounting for variance in growth in all four species, particularly after removal of disturbance-related outlier years (0.36, Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of Geography in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science., Degree Awarded: Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2007., Date of Defense: Date of Defense: March 30, 2007., Keywords: Celtis laevigata, Quercus laurifolia Quercus lyrata, Taxodium distichum, Flood regime, Ordination, Tree rings, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: J. Anthony Stallins, Professor Directing Thesis; James B. Elsner, Committee Member; Xiaojun Yang, Committee Member.
Long-Term ENSO-Related Winter Rainfall Predictions over the Southeast U.S. Using the FSU Global Spectral Model
Long-Term ENSO-Related Winter Rainfall Predictions over the Southeast U.S. Using the FSU Global Spectral Model
Rainfall patterns over the Southeast U.S. have been found to be connected to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Warm ENSO events cause positive precipitation anomalies and cold ENSO events cause negative precipitation anomalies. With this level of connection, models can be used to test the predictability of ENSO events. Using the Florida State University Global Spectral Model (FSUGSM), model data over a 50-year period will be evaluated for its similarity to observations. The FSUGSM is a global spectral model with a T63 horizontal resolution (approximately 1.875°) and 17 unevenly spaced vertical levels. Details of this model can be found in Cocke and LaRow (2000). The experiment utilizes two runs using the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) RAS convection scheme and two runs using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) SAS convection scheme to comprise the ensemble. The simulation was done for 50 years, from 1950 to 1999. Reynolds and Smith monthly mean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from 1950-1999 provide the lower boundary condition. Atmospheric and land conditions from January 1, 1987 and January 1, 1995 were used as the initial starting conditions. The observational precipitation data being used as the basis for comparison is a gridded global dataset from Willmott and Matsuura (2005). Phase precipitation differences show higher precipitation amounts for El Niño than La Niña in all model runs. Temporal correlations between model runs and the observations show southern and eastern areas with the highest correlation values during an ENSO event. Skill scores validate the findings of the model/observation correlations, with southern and eastern areas showing scores close to zero. Temporal correlations between tropical Pacific SSTs and Southeast precipitation further confirm the model's ability to predict ENSO precipitation patterns over the Southeast U.S. The inconsistency in the SST/precipitation correlations between the models can be attributed to differences in the 200-mb jet stream and 500-mb height anomalies. Slight differences in position and strength for both variables affect the teleconnection between tropical Pacific SSTs and Southeast., Submitted Note: A Thesis Submitted to the Department of Meteorology in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science., Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2006., Date of Defense: April 21, 2006., Keywords: Correlation, Model, Precipitation, ENSO, Skill Score, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: James J. O'Brien, Professor Directing Thesis; Carol Anne Clayson, Committee Member; Fei-Fei Jin, Committee Member.
Long-Term Effect of Music Therapy on Nurses' Self-Perceived Stress Levels
Long-Term Effect of Music Therapy on Nurses' Self-Perceived Stress Levels
The purpose of this study was to explore the long-term effect of music therapy intervention (in this case, progressive muscle relaxation) on the self-perceived stress levels of nurses compared to nurses not receiving the intervention. Forty-Six participants, who were Registered Nurses on the Oncology units of a hospital, took part in a relaxation study in which their perceived stress levels were recorded on a Likert type scale. Participants were placed in one of two groups: the progressive muscle relaxation group (PMR), or the control group in which nurses received no relaxation intervention (NR). Results indicated that participants in the NR group or control group had no significant changes in their stress levels over a 12 hour shift period. The PMR group, or intervention group, had significant indications in relaxation between the second stress survey, given prior to the intervention, and the third stress survey given immediately following the progressive muscle relaxation intervention. After a period of 3 hours, the PMR group showed no significant increases or decreases in relaxation between the third and fourth stress survey, indicating the intervention maintained a relaxation effect after a long-term period of time. Correlations between stress and patient care, as well as, stress and job satisfaction were also identified within and between groups. These findings provide evidence of a long-term relaxation effect on stress levels through the use of music therapy intervention and also provide support for the implementation of music therapy intervention for increased medical staff support and well-being., Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Music., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester 2018., Date of Defense: March 12, 2018., Keywords: Music Therapy, Progressive Muscle Relaxation, Stress, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Jayne Standley, Professor Directing Thesis; Dianne Gregory, Committee Member; Clifford Madsen, Committee Member.
Long-Term Effects of Peer Victimization
Long-Term Effects of Peer Victimization
Gifted individuals tend to experience social stressors similar to their not-gifted peers, yet minimal research has been conducted on the potential impact of early social difficulties on their later adjustment. The main purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between early experiences of peer victimization and later well-being in honors college students and the potential moderating effect of social support on this relationship. Three research questions were posed: What is the difference in reported early peer victimization between honors college students and non-honors college students; what is the relationship between early experiences of peer victimization and later well-being of gifted and not-gifted college students, with respect to age, gender, and ethnicity differences; and does early social support serve to moderate the relationship between early peer victimization and later well-being in gifted and not-gifted students? Completed data from a total of 78 honors and 68 non-honors college student participants, attending 1 of 2 four-year universities in the southeastern region of the United States, were analyzed. Early experiences of peer victimization, current well-being, and early perception of social support were measured utilizing the Retrospective Bullying Questionnaire, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Satisfaction With Life Scale, Ryff's Scales of Psychological Well-Being, and a revised version of the Child and Adolescent Social Support Scale, respectively. The ages of student participants ranged from 18-33 years of age. Data was collected for this study between Summer and Fall 2016. A chi-square test of independence, MANOVA, and MANCOVA were utilized to investigate the study's research questions. Results indicated that gifted students reported more early experiences of relational forms of peer victimization than not-gifted students. For both groups, White/Caucasian, Black/African-American, and Asian/Pacific Islander participants and those with early experiences of bullying showed variation in scores of well-being. Significant interaction effects suggested that early social support from teachers and close friends moderated the relationship between early experiences of victimization and later well-being. A discussion regarding the interpretation, limitations, implications of the obtained findings, along with needs for future research, is provided., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems in partial fulfillment of the Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester 2017., Date of Defense: April 14, 2017., Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Steven I. Pfeiffer, Professor Directing Dissertation; Christine A. Readdick, University Representative; Debra Osborn, Committee Member; Angel Canto, Committee Member.
Long-Term Influence of Family Contexts and Processes in Biological Families and Stepfather Families on Young Adult Children's Intimate Relationships
Long-Term Influence of Family Contexts and Processes in Biological Families and Stepfather Families on Young Adult Children's Intimate Relationships
The main purpose of the present study was to examine the influences of parental relationship instability, parental relationship happiness, and parent-child relationships on young adult intimate relationship outcomes. The effects of parental relationship instability were explored by using two different family groups: biological families and stepfather families. Data from the all three waves of the National Survey of Families and Households was used for this study. Structural Equation Modeling was used as the analysis method to examine the relationships between the variables of interest. Based on Ecological Systems Theory, it was hypothesized that low parental relationship instability, high parental marital happiness, and frequent involvement and high quality in parent-child relationships would determine positive outcomes in young adult intimate relationships. It was also hypothesized that there would be mediating relationships between the family variables and young adults' intimate relationship outcomes. The findings partially supported Ecological Systems Theory in that the various family context and processes variables were significantly related to children's young adult intimate relationship happiness and stability. However, there was no support for the mediating hypotheses. Parents' marital happiness emerged the largest, significant predicator of young adult intimate relationship outcomes in both family groups. Additionally for the two family groups, different causal pathways of the family variables were illustrated through Structural Equation Modeling. Important contributions of the current study include a better understanding of the long-term influences of parental relationship instability, parental relationship happiness, and parent-child relationships on emerging adults' intimate relationship outcomes. Implications for researchers, clinicians, and educators are presented., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Family and Child Sciences in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2009., Date of Defense: March 31, 2009., Keywords: Stepfamilies, Parent-Child Relationships, Relationship Happiness, Relationship Stability, Young Adult Intimate Relationships, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Thomas A. Cornille, Professor Directing Dissertation; Neil Abell, Outside Committee Member; Ann K. Mullis, Committee Member; Robert E. Lee, III, Committee Member.
Long-Term Influence of Father Involvement on Emerging Adults' Psychological Well-Being
Long-Term Influence of Father Involvement on Emerging Adults' Psychological Well-Being
This study examined the longitudinal influence of father involvement on emerging adult children's psychological well-being. This was explored in the contexts of mother involvement, interparental marital relationships, and children's attributes. In addition, it was aimed to focus only on positive aspects of children's psychological well-being, because protecting children from negative outcomes is not identical to promoting positive child outcomes. This study was based on Ecological Systems Theory. In particular, the PPCT (process, person, contexts, and time) model guided this study, in that proximal processes were represented by the interactions between a father and a child, person was represented by children's attributes, contexts were represented by mother involvement and interparental marital relationships, and time was represented by a longitudinal analysis of this study. To examine the research question, a secondary analysis was performed with three waves of data from the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH). The sub-sample of this study was 362 households where parents had maintained their marital relationship and responded to the survey since Wave 1, and where the focal children were the biological children of the parents. Variables of interests were constructed, using items measuring each construct: father/mother involvement, interparental marital relationship, children's attributes (race, household income, and gender), and children's psychological well-being (life satisfaction and self-mastery). The analysis was conducted using structural equation modeling with the AMOS 5.0 software. The results showed that father involvement in young childhood had a long-term influence on emerging adult children's life satisfaction. In addition, father involvement was influenced by mother involvement and interparental marital relationship contemporaneously in both Waves 1 and 2. Furthermore, interparental marital relationship was the strongest determinant of emerging adult children's life satisfaction. Mother involvement did not show any direct influence on children's psychological well-being. Interparental marital relationship and father involvement affect each other across data collection times (Waves 1 and 2). Children's attributes represented by race, household income, and gender did not affect these relationships except for the effect of father involvement at Wave 1 on children's self-mastery. All these results partially supported the hypotheses of this study and Ecological Systems Theory; children's developmental outcomes are the products of father-child relationships in the contexts of mother involvement and interparental marital relationship, and time; children's attributes were not strong determinants of child outcomes. This study suggested several implications: (1) early father involvement has a long-term influence on children's psychological well-being in emerging adulthood, (2) father involvement is influenced by contextual factors of mother involvement and parents' marital relationships, (3) children's attributes of race, household income, and gender affect father/mother involvement, interparental marital relationship, and children's psychological well-being in various ways. Although this study had limitations, it indicated that children's positive psychological well-being in emerging adulthood could be promoted by several familial factors in young childhood and adolescence as well as children's attributes., Submitted Note: A Dissertation Submitted to the Department of Family and Child Sciences in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2007., Date of Defense: March 28, 2007., Keywords: Life Satisfaction, Mother-Child Relationship, Interparental Marital Relationship, Fathering, Father-Child Relationship, Self-Mastery, Emerging Adulthood, Children's Well-Being, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: Thomas A. Cornille, Professor Directing Dissertation; Gary Peterson, Outside Committee Member; Ann K. Mullis, Committee Member; B. Kay Pasley, Committee Member.
Long-Term Performance of Epoxy Filled Steel Grate Decking
Long-Term Performance of Epoxy Filled Steel Grate Decking
In the Florida State highway system there are 11,100 bridges (6,300 State bridges and 4,800 local bridges). The highway system includes 98 movable bridges, which are located within seven geographic districts. These bridge decks are constructed with steel open metal grate decking to reduce the weight of the superstructure and load carried by the substructure. When traffic traverses on the bridge deck systems, a significant level of noise is generated. This noise has caused some discomfort and has become a nuisance to the public, especially in regard to those bridges located near populated areas. Because of the problem, it has been suggested that filling the open grate with epoxy and fine aggregate broadcasted on it will increase the friction resistance and reduce the noise from bridge deck systems. For new bridges, concrete filling (exodermic deck) has been used, taking the extra weight from the concrete into consideration during the design stage. For the older bridges, however, the extra concrete weight was not considered in the design stage. Thus, the use of epoxy materials, which are lighter than concrete, is necessary in existing decks in order to remain within the load-carrying capacity of the other components of the bridge. The primary objective of this study was to address the performance of the filled steel deck systems, the behavior and effect of repetitive thermal loads (temperatures below and above normal ambient temperature) to the open steel grid deck systems that were filled with epoxy resin. The deck systems filled with epoxy materials were subjected to accelerated climate chamber to simulate similar or extreme field conditions. Experimental results found that the performance of the open filled decks depends on the weather conditions. Under temperatures above normal ambient temperature, the interfacial region showed severe delamination compared to temperatures below normal ambient temperature. Also the study found that the performances at the interfacial region were affected by the number of cycles for both low and high temperatures., Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering in partial fulfillment of the Requirements for the degree of the Master of the science., Degree Awarded: Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2006., Date of Defense: Date of Defense: August 11, 2006., Keywords: Bridge maintenance, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: Primus V. Mtenga, Professor Directing Thesis; Kamal S. Tawfiq, Committee Member; John O. Sobanjo, Committee Member.
Longitudinal Analysis of Corporal Punishment Across Groups
Longitudinal Analysis of Corporal Punishment Across Groups
This longitudinal study includes 397 parents from the National Survey of Families and Households and examines whether the effects of corporal punishment on future disobedience, when controlling for previous disobedience, differ depending on parental involvement, race, gender, or age. Hypotheses were tested using factorial ANCOVA, ordinary least squares regression, and a series of one-way ANOVAs. Results indicate that corporal punishment was not helpful in reducing disobedience for any involvement and demographic subgroups, and it seemed to be more harmful when used on older children and when used by less involved fathers on their sons. These findings are interpreted from the perspective of social bonding theory. Recommendations for researchers, policymakers, and professionals are discussed., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Family and Child Sciences in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2012., Date of Defense: October 23, 2012., Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Lenore McWey, Professor Directing Dissertation; Carter Hay, University Representative; Ann Mullis, Committee Member; Ron Mullis, Committee Member.
Longitudinal Analysis of Science Teaching and Learning in Kindergarten and First-Grade
Longitudinal Analysis of Science Teaching and Learning in Kindergarten and First-Grade
This study attempted to determine how often science is taught in the early grades as well as the science topics taught in these grades. A related purpose of the study was to determine the relationship between science teaching and students' science achievement. In doing so, the analyses took into consideration the influence of gender, socioeconomic status (SES), and race/ethnicity on children's academic performance in science. By using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study- Kindergarten class of 1998-99 (ECLS-K) kindergarten and first-grade data files, children's science Item Response Theory Scores (IRT) and Academic Rating Scores (ARS) were examined to measure the relationship between children's early science experiences in schools and their achievement on the "General Knowledge Assessment Battery". According to this study's findings science teaching and learning in kindergarten level is somewhat limited. Additionally, the science content taught in kindergarten is narrow. The results of cross-sectional and longitudinal multilevel analyses revealed that several student and school level factors can influence young children's science achievement in kindergarten and first-grade. Although there were inconsistent conclusions about male and female students' science achievement as assessed by direct and indirect assessment batteries, there was no association between children's science scores and their gender and the amount or degree of science practices in school. While results of the analyses clearly showed that socioeconomic status (SES) had the most influence on both kindergarten and first-grade children's science achievement, the findings related to the effects of different science practices on science achievement were inconsistent. The results showed that science instruction effects some children's science achievement more than others. The findings have important implications for policies governing the teaching of science in the early grades. A clear demand exist for extension of science resource materials to include broader topics, more child-selected activities, integration with other subject areas, and more quality time for science teaching and learning in the early grades., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the School of Teacher Education in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2008., Date of Defense: October 24, 2008., Keywords: Science Education in Early Grades, Longitudinal Analysis, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Ithel Jones, Professor Directing Dissertation; Leslie Aspinwall, Outside Committee Member; Vickie E. Lake, Committee Member; Carolyn Piazza, Committee Member.
Longitudinal Comparison of Vocational and Non-Vocational Education Students in Leon          County Public Secondary Schools
Longitudinal Comparison of Vocational and Non-Vocational Education Students in Leon County Public Secondary Schools
The purpose of this study was to compare vocational and non-vocational education students in public secondary schools in Leon County, Florida, to see whether high school graduates who were in vocational education programs in their 9th through 12th grades had more advantages in graduation, postsecondary school enrollment, employment, and wages, over their non-vocational education counterparts. In order to achieve this purpose, data for Godby, Leon, Lincoln, and Rickards High Schools' May 1999, and May 2000, high-school and post-highschool were collected, analyzed, and compared. Eighth grade data were also collected to determine the subjects' socioeconomic status. A sample of 2,698 students was obtained from the four high schools involved in this study. The data for the investigation were obtained from the Florida Department of Education's (FDOE) "Florida Education and Training Placement Information Program" (FETPIP) and "Educational Information and Accountability Services" (EIAS) databases. Through "skewed" (rearranged) students identification numbers, it was possible to track each high school graduate to their eighth grade data. The analytical method heavily relied on descriptive statistics with intensive use of tables. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software was used to summarize and analyze the data. Findings The study indicated that students in high school vocational education programs may have some advantages over non-vocational education students in terms of high school graduation, postsecondary school enrollment, employment and probably wages. The data indicated that participation in vocational education programs were distributed among the students that were representative of both the lower socioeconomic status (LSES) and the higher socioeconomic status (HSES) categories, male and female, black and white. The data further indicated that vocational education programs may have motivational values to the advantage of academically disadvantaged students, especially those within the LSES category, thereby enabling them to remain in school and graduate. Analyses of the data showed that in most cases, vocational education students, especially within the LSES, reported a higher rate of graduation from high school than their non-vocational education colleagues. The data further showed that in some cases, especially among the LSES black students, the more vocational education credits or courses a student earned in high school, the more likely the student graduates from high school. The study also indicated that vocational education high school graduates were very competitive against their non-vocational education high school counterparts in terms of college enrollments. In some cases, especially among the LSES students, vocational education high school graduates reported higher rates of university enrollments than non-vocational education students. Regarding community college enrollment, the study indicated that both vocational and non-vocational education high school graduates were more attracted to the Associate in Arts (AA) degrees (college transfer option) than the Associate in Science (AS) degree programs (more professional and work option). The study further indicated that most vocational education high school graduates who enrolled in undergraduate BS degree programs were majoring in the fields similar to the vocational education programs in which they were trained in high school. Higher rates of employment were also reported among vocational education high school graduates than among non-vocational education counterparts. The study further showed that high school graduates who had participated in a Diversified Cooperative Education vocational program (internship or on-the-job training program), Business Technology Education, Computer Science Education, and Family and Consumer Science Education in high school were more likely than were non-vocational education colleagues to be employed in professional fields such as banks, doctors offices, law enforcement, hotels, and with more hours, and presumably better wages. The study also indicated that in some cases, vocational education high school graduates who were working in the fields for which they were trained in high school earned more wages with more working hours than did their non-vocational education colleagues. Since these were only high school graduates with limited occupational skills and job experience, the wage differences between vocational and non-vocational education high school graduates may not be very wide. Conclusions: Participation in vocational education enhanced the chances of high school graduation, especially if the students earn two or more vocational education credits or courses, improved the chances of enrollment in undergraduate BS, AA, and AS degree programs, and also improved the prospect of job opportunities and higher wages, especially among the students and high school graduates who worked in the fields for which they were trained in high school. These benefits of vocational education over non-vocational education were more noticeably among lower socioeconomic status black male and female, and white female students and high school graduates., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education., Degree Awarded: Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2005., Date of Defense: Date of Defense: June 6, 2005., Keywords: Vocational, Non-Vocational, High School Graduates, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: Hollie Thomas, Professor Directing Dissertation; Marsha Rehm, Outside Committee Member; William R. Snyder, Committee Member; Bonnie B. Greenwood, Committee Member.
Longitudinal Diagnostic Classification Model for Attribute Acquisition
Longitudinal Diagnostic Classification Model for Attribute Acquisition
This study introduces a longitudinal diagnostic classification model, called the LTA+HDCM, which is a fusion of latent transition analysis (LTA; Collins & Flaherty, 2002; Collins & Wugalter, 1992) and the hierarchical diagnostic classification model (HDCM; Templin & Bradshaw, 2014). The primary goals in this study are (1) to evaluate the adequacy of the LTA+HDCM to recover the order of theoretical levels of learning progressions (LPs) with attributes in a linear hierarchy, and (2) to recover measurement model parameters (item and person parameters) and structural model parameters (latent status prevalences and transition probabilities) under different study conditions in which the LTA+HDCM is employed. A simulation study is used to achieve the study goals. The design factors are selected to reflect aspects of the measurement model that can be manipulated to infer learners' statuses on LP levels: number of measurement occasions T = (2, 3), test lengths consisting of J = (12, 18, 24) items, Q-matrix designs consisting of Q = (3, 6) item types, and sample sizes N = (500, 1000, 1500). Convergence rates, X2 goodness-of-fit statistics, classification accuracy statistics, and graphical displays are used to evaluate the adequacy of the model to achieve the study goals. An empirical study using data from the Mathematization in Science (MTS; Jin et al., 2019) LP is then conducted to recover LP levels. The simulation study identified three important design factors which impacted the ability of the LTA+HDCM to recover LP theoretical levels and evidence and competency growth parameters. These factors are test length J, sample size N, and Q-matrix design. Of the three factors, complexity of Q-matrix design is most influential in recovery of LP theoretical levels and evidence and competency growth model parameter. In study conditions in which the Complete Q-matrix design (Q = 6 item types) was implemented, the LTA+HDCM fully recovered LP theoretical levels and provided ignorable bias of parameter estimates. In contrast, LP theoretical levels and parameters were only partially recovered in study conditions with the Partial Q-matrix design (Q = 3 item types)., A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., November 8, 2021., hierarchical diagnostic classification model, latent transition analysis, learning progression, linear hierarchy, Includes bibliographical references., Russell Almond, Professor Directing Dissertation; Fred Huffer, University Representative; Qian Zhang, Committee Member; Insu Paek, Committee Member.
Longitudinal Follow-Up of Purging Syndromes
Longitudinal Follow-Up of Purging Syndromes
Both psychological and physiological data support the concurrent validity of distinguishing between bulimia nervosa (BN) and purging disorder (PD) based on the presence vs. absence of binge-eating episodes, respectively. However, limited data exist on the predictive validity of this distinction. Differences in outcome or predictors of outcome would support the clinical utility of distinguishing between the two disorders, a key criterion for diagnoses within the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. The current study sought to describe the long-term outcome of PD and compare that outcome to BN and to examine cognitive (shape/weight concerns), cognitive-affective (depressive symptoms, loss of control eating), and behavioral (eating episode size) predictors of outcome. Exploratory analyses tested if predictors of outcome differed between diagnoses and examined physiological (leptin and postprandial cholecystokinin response) predictors of outcome. Women (N = 217; N = 84 PD, N = 133 BN) were invited to completed diagnostic interviews and questionnaires at a mean (SD) of 10.60 (3.72) years following baseline assessments. Two outcomes were examined: eating disorder status and purging frequency. Of the women sought, 94% were successfully located, and 58 PD and 91 BN participated. Diagnostic stability was observed at follow-up, but outcome did not differ between PD and BN. Within PD, greater depressive symptoms predicted a lower likelihood of remission, and lower leptin levels predicted higher purging frequency at follow-up. Within BN, no variables predicted eating disorder status at follow-up. Fewer shape/weight concerns, greater loss of control eating frequency, and a larger postprandial cholecystokinin response each predicted a higher purging frequency in BN at follow-up; however, these models should be interpreted cautiously due to difficulties with model fit. Exploratory analyses indicated that baseline diagnosis did not significantly moderate associations between predictors and outcome. Taken together, results do not provide conclusive support for distinguishing between PD and BN based on outcome or predictors of outcome. Findings may reflect the longer duration of follow-up in this study compared to prior work. More work on empirically supported treatments in PD, and potential differences in response between PD and BN, are needed to fully evaluate the clinical utility of distinguishing between PD and BN and to inform diagnostic schemes., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Psychology in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester 2018., Date of Defense: April 16, 2018., Keywords: bulimia nervosa, loss of control eating, outcome, purging, purging disorder, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Pamela K. Keel, Professor Directing Dissertation; Mark Winegardner, University Representative; Thomas E. Joiner, Committee Member; Norman B. Schmidt, Committee Member; Diana L. Williams, Committee Member.
Longitudinal, Multi-City Examination of Public Social Control and Neighborhood Crime
Longitudinal, Multi-City Examination of Public Social Control and Neighborhood Crime
A growing body of neighborhood research focuses on external resources, ties to the public level of social control, and their impact on neighborhood crime rates. This work generally finds that stronger ties to the public level and greater external resources are associated with lower levels of crime and victimization. Much of the recent research in this area focuses on the impact of home lending on crime. While informative, prior studies frequently consider all forms of lending within a single variable ignoring heterogeneity in loan purpose and quality. In addition, past work has neglected the possible impact of small business loans on crime rates. This study addresses those gaps in the literature by assessing the impact of prime and subprime home lending in addition to home loans of various purposes. Furthermore, data on community levels of small business lending is used to examine the influence of these loans on robbery. In doing so, this study utilizes longitudinal census tract data from 53 American cities. The results from the longitudinal fixed effects negative binomial models indicate that higher levels of subprime lending are related to increases in robbery rates, while increases in prime lending yield declines in robbery. However, the impact of prime loans only become apparent after accounting for subprime loans, suggesting a nuanced relationship between home lending and crime. In addition, the number of small business loans in a census tract corresponds to lower robbery rates and this effect is independent of home lending., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the College of Criminology and Criminal Justice in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Summer Semester 2018., Date of Defense: June 29, 2018., Keywords: Communities and Crime, Community Investment, Criminology, Public Social Control, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Brian J. Stults, Professor Directing Dissertation; Keith R. Ihlanfeldt, University Representative; Daniel P. Mears, Committee Member; Eric A. Stewart, Committee Member; Eric P. Baumer, Committee Member.
Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris) Growth and Population Dynamics under Climate Change
Longleaf Pine (Pinus palustris) Growth and Population Dynamics under Climate Change
The longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savanna is an endangered ecosystem within a global biodiversity hotspot. However, most studies of longleaf habitats have not considered the distinct structure and function of unique longleaf communities, which is critical for developing appropriate management strategies. Florida has 50% of the remaining habitat, where it occurs in unique community types that differ in their hydrology, species composition, and disturbance regimes. The structure and growth of longleaf pine in the different community types depends on the unique interactions between these abiotic and biotic components. The legacy of anthropogenic disturbance through logging, fragmentation, fire exclusion, and the rapidly changing climate have resulted in potentially novel dynamics for longleaf pine ecosystems. Identifying the drivers of tree growth and population dynamics can facilitate a better understanding of longleaf status and vulnerability to global change. In this dissertation, I explored and assessed how disturbances (fires and hurricanes) interact with species composition and climatic conditions to affect tree density, growth rates, and stand structure across community types in Florida. First, I assessed how differences in climate, fire, and species composition interact and relate to longleaf pine densities and growth rates in distinct communities. I used field surveys and tree cores to estimate stand structure and growth rates across community types. I used linear mixed-effects models to examine the effect of community type on longleaf pine density and growth rates and then used recursive partitioning and regression tree analyses to identify how climate, fire, and species composition affect density and growth rates. I found that stand structure and species composition were different across communities, whereas growth rates were not. Across communities, unique interactions between climate, fire, and species composition, resulted in differences in stand structure. In general, tree and grass stage densities were best predicted by species composition and fire rather than by climate within unique community types, whereas overall growth rates were best predicted by climate. I show that longleaf growth rates increased with higher temperatures, but this effect is reversed in dry conditions. Our research includes the southernmost extent of longleaf, and our results suggest that longleaf growth rates across its range will be more sensitive to current and future climate change than longleaf population density. Second, I used unique dendroecological methods to explore how climate and fire interact to affect annual tree growth. Traditional dendrochronological methods mask out individual variation by using stand level indices, and have a bias towards sampling resource limited trees, which is an effective strategy for climate reconstruction, but lacks an ecological focus. I present eight ecologically representative Florida longleaf pine chronologies and compare the strength of seasonwood and total ring width chronologies, finding that latewood growth had stronger climatic correlations, but not stronger crossdating. Then, I used correlation analyses to identify the primary climatic drivers of tree growth and found summer precipitation had a positive effect and summer temperature had a negative effect at a majority of sites, although there was no climatic variable at any season length with exact effects on tree growth across sites. Finally, I used linear mixed effects models to estimate how the climatic drivers interact with fire to affect individual tree growth. I identified unique effects from fire seasonality, with negative effects due to dormant season burning at 60% of sites. I found positive effects from fire in the previous year in 60% of sites. In many cases, fire reversed or neutralized the effect of climate, suggesting unique implications for management under climate change. By using ecologically representative samples, I show how climate and fire interact differently to affect tree growth and highlight variability in ecosystem function across communities and sites. Finally, I investigate immediate hurricane impacts to stand structure at four sites after experiencing an unprecedented Category 5 storm, which exemplifies the growing threats the longleaf pine ecosystem faces under anthropogenic climate change. I used variable-area transects and generalized linear mixed-effects models to estimate tree densities and logistic regression to estimate mortality by size class. I found at least 28% of the global total remaining extent of the longleaf pine ecosystem was affected in Florida alone. Mortality was highest in medium sized trees (30-45 cm dbh) and ranged from 4.6-15.4% at sites further from the storm center, but increased to 87.8% near the storm center. As the frequency and intensity of extreme events increases, management plans to mitigate the effects of climate change need to account for large-scale stochastic mortality events to preserve critical habitats. Even where protected, critical habitats are vulnerable to the effects of climate change., A Dissertation submitted to the Department Of Geography in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., December 9, 2022., biogeography, dendrochronology, Includes bibliographical references., Stephanie Pau, Professor Directing Dissertation; Thomas Miller, University Representative; Sarah Lester, Committee Member; Monica Rother, Committee Member; Tingting Zhao, Committee Member.
Look at Black Ethnic Identity and Transracial Adoption
Look at Black Ethnic Identity and Transracial Adoption
The researcher of this study used an applied developmental contextual framework to examine the predictors of the ethnic identity level in transracial, inracial, and interracial couple adoptees of African descent. The relationship between ethnic identity level and age, sex, parent-child relationship satisfaction, family functioning, perceived social support, and type of adoption were investigated through ANOVA, Pearson r Correlations, and Standard Multiple Regression analyses. The model significantly predicted ethnic identity level. The moderating effects of sex and type of adoption were significant. Implications regarding research, clinical practice, and policy were provided., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Family and Child Sciences in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2008., Date of Defense: April 25, 2008., Keywords: Interracial Couples and Adoption, Transracial Adoption, Ethnic Identity, Black/African American Adolescents and Adoption, Inracial, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.

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