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Life and Contributions of Charles Oliver Delaney with a Survey of His Compositional Style within His Solo Flute          Works
Life and Contributions of Charles Oliver Delaney with a Survey of His Compositional Style within His Solo Flute Works
Charles Oliver DeLaney (1925-2006) is considered one of the most influential American flute pedagogues of the twentieth-century. His contributions to the flute community continue to be felt today through his generations of students, many of whom hold prestigious performing and teaching positions. Through organizations such as the National Flute Association (NFA) and the Florida Flute Association (FFA), DeLaney helped establish regional and national opportunities for flutists. Furthermore, his compositions provide performers with the opportunity to explore literal and figurative expression in music from a distinct American perspective. DeLaney's contributions as a performer, composer, and pedagogue are documented through his publications of compositions and method books, National Flute Association and Brevard Summer Music Program archives, and two Flute Talk magazine articles (" Of Flutes and Muses " by Kathleen Goll-Wilson, December 1995; " DeLaney's Compositional Endeavors " by Karen Haid, April 1999). Despite this body of information, detailed information on his life and compositions remains sparse. In order to adequately appreciate DeLaney's accomplishments and contributions to the North American Flute School and within the context of flute history in general, a brief historical summary of the contributions of flutists/composers/pedagogues and their significance in advancing the flute and its literature will first be explored. To focus the analysis only professional flutists who were also documented as successful composers and pedagogues, are included in the following summary. Likewise, only American trends will be presented in the section transitioning into the twentieth-century. The bulk of this treatise details DeLaney's contributions as a composer, examining his formative influences and inspirations, while defining his nationalistic neo-Romantic compositional style. Analysis of his three published works for solo flute, Hymn of Pan (1949), " …and the strange, unknown flowers… " (1988), and Variations on an English Folk-Song: "The Seeds of Love" (for solo alto flute or C flute, 1989), is preceded by a summary of his remaining oeuvre, including his published and unpublished compositions. A discussion of performance and pedagogical considerations concludes each analysis. DeLaney's highly artistic and cleverly calculated compositional style reflects a unique coalescence of American and European perspectives gained during his studies in the United States and Switzerland. Musically and pedagogically, his compositions for solo flute are highly accessible, idiomatic, wonderfully expressive, imaginative and colorful. Their programmatic and nationalistic origins, tonal melodies, and organic development make them well suited for a variety of skill levels and performance settings. Furthermore, DeLaney's extensive involvement in various musical venues mirrors the practices of centuries of previous flutists who were also successful as pedagogues and composers at a time when specialization was encouraged., Submitted Note: A Treatise submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Music., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2011., Date of Defense: March 15, 2011., Keywords: Variations on an English Folk Song: "The Seeds of unknown flowers...", Hymn of Pan and the strange flutist composers, Neo-Romantic, Florida State University, Charles DeLaney, solo flute music, American Flute School, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Eva Amsler, Professor Co-Directing Treatise; Jeff Keesecker, Professor Co-Directing Treatise; Evan Allan Jones, University Representative; Frank Kowalsky, Committee Member.
Life and Music of Canadian Jazz Clarinetist Phil Nimmons
Life and Music of Canadian Jazz Clarinetist Phil Nimmons
This treatise will focus on the life and music of Canadian jazz clarinetist Phil Nimmons. It will introduce Canadian and non-Canadian musicians to Phil Nimmons' accomplishments as a jazz performer, composer, and pedagogue. Phil Nimmons has been an active member of the Canadian music scene since the late 1930s. He has contributed to the evolution of the Canadian jazz scene, is recognized as being one of Canada's great composers, and a pedagogue who helped to develop jazz education in Canada. As a composer, Nimmons has written over 400 classical and jazz compositions for stage, television, radio, theater and film, in addition to hundreds of jazz orchestrations. As a performer, Nimmons has been credited for his significant contribution to the cultural life of Canada for being largely responsible for bringing jazz into the mainstream through radio performances, concerts, workshops and the classroom. As an educator, Nimmons was a founding member of the Advanced School of Contemporary Music (ASCM). He was the first Artistic Director of the jazz program at the Banff Centre for the Arts, and influential in the inauguration of the Jazz program at the University of Toronto, of which he is Director Emeritus and has taught at the Faculty of Music for over 30 years., Submitted Note: A Treatise submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Music., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2011., Date of Defense: November 3, 2011., Keywords: ASCM, Clarinet, IJEA, Jazz, Juno, Phil Nimmons, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Frank Kowalsky, Professor Directing Treatise; Richard Clary, University Representative; Deborah Bish, Committee Member; Eric Ohlsson, Committee Member.
Life and Music of Daniel Nelson with a Performer’s Guide to the Clarinet Concerto
Life and Music of Daniel Nelson with a Performer’s Guide to the Clarinet Concerto
Composer Daniel Nelson (b. 1965) is a unique figure in the world of contemporary music. A dual citizen of the United States and Sweden, he received musical training in both countries and has had his music performed world-wide. Nelson's music is colorful, often rhythmic, neoclassical in formal construction, harmonically accessible, and includes influences ranging from Mozart to Depeche Mode. Critics have extolled his music as "exuberant" with "magnificently mobile orchestration." Daniel Nelson's Clarinet Concerto (2000) may be regarded as his professional breakthrough. The work was a success in Sweden and performed several times throughout Europe and in the United States. Clarinetist Niklas Andersson premiered and recorded the work in 2000 with the Västerås Sinfonietta. However, the work is still relatively unknown despite its superlative quality, accessibility, and promotion of the clarinet as a versatile instrument technically, stylistically, and emotively. This treatise provides information on all of the works in Nelson's catalogue as well as new pieces currently in production. In order to promote the Clarinet Concerto and further aid it in securing a deserved position in the standard repertoire, this treatise includes a performer's guide. The guide not only provides detailed advice for clarinetists tackling the concerto, but also for collaborative pianists or orchestra conductors., Submitted Note: A Treatise submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Music., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2014., Date of Defense: November 13, 2014., Keywords: Clarinet, Daniel Nelson, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Deborah Bish, Professor Directing Treatise; Patrick Meighan, Committee Member; Eric Ohlsson, Committee Member.
Life and Music of John Boda with an Emphasis on His Saxophone Works
Life and Music of John Boda with an Emphasis on His Saxophone Works
John Boda (1922-2002) was a highly accomplished pianist, conductor, composer, and professor. His diverse musical talents and eclectic hobbies defined him and influenced countless students, colleagues, friends and family members. During his long and productive music career, he taught at The Florida State University for fifty-three years and wrote more than 150 compositions for every genre except opera. This study explores the life and music of Boda with particular attention given to his saxophone works. Despite his success, many of Boda's compositions are unpublished and unrecognized for their merit. Of the four pieces he wrote for the saxophone, Perambulations (1977), Forest Sounds and Dance (1982), Concert Piece (1982), and Two Movements for Saxophone Quartet (1983), none are published and only two are listed in A Comprehensive Guide to the Saxophone Repertoire 1844-2003 by Jean-Marie Londeix. These works are valuable additions to the saxophone repertoire and warrant awareness within the saxophone community. Chapter One is a biography of John Boda, focusing on his musicianship. Chapter Two is a summary of Boda's compositional style at various stages throughout his career. Many compositions are referenced to illustrate the continuity of structure and form in his pieces. Chapters Three, Four, Five, and Six, respectively, examine each of Boda's four saxophone works. A historical background and stylistic overview are given for each piece and musical examples are taken from original manuscripts., Submitted Note: A Treatise submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Music., Degree Awarded: Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2009., Date of Defense: Date of Defense: August 19, 2009., Keywords: Saxophone, Boda, John Boda, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: Patrick Meighan, Professor Directing Treatise; James Mathes, Outside Committee Member; Frank Kowalsky, Committee Member; Jeff keesecker, Committee Member; Anne Hodges, Committee Member.
Life and Music of Roland Marvin Carter
Life and Music of Roland Marvin Carter
This study aims to broaden awareness of the contributions of one of America's prominent African-American choral composers, arrangers, educators, and conductors—Roland Marvin Carter. Carter, known by many as the "Dean of African-American Music," is often recognized for his efforts to preserve African-American music and traditions. Carter devoted his life to preserving Negro folk music and its identity in American culture through his teaching, conducting, composing and arranging of choral music. He taught at several respected institutions, including Hampton Institute, later named Hampton University (1965-1989), and The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (1989-2013). In his 50-year career as a choral music educator, Carter has influenced many students who have become choral conductors in a variety of venues, continuing his legacy in the preservation of choral music composed by African-Americans., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester 2017., Date of Defense: April 10, 2017., Keywords: Charles Flax, Hampton Choir Directors and Organists' Guild, Hampton Institute Choir, Negro Spirituals, Roland Carter, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: André J. Thomas, Professor Directing Dissertation; Michelle M. Stebleton, University Representative; Clifford K. Madsen, Committee Member; Judy S. Bowers, Committee Member; Katarzyna "Kasia" Bugaj, Committee Member.
Life and Solo Vocal Works of Margaret Allison Bonds (1913-1972)
Life and Solo Vocal Works of Margaret Allison Bonds (1913-1972)
This treatise examines the life and solo vocal works of composer Margaret Allison Bonds (1913-1972). It includes a biographical outline of Bonds's family background, education, and students. Her accomplishments as a concert pianist, composer, and music educator in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles are also described. The second half offers an overview of Bonds's solo vocal compositions. There is one chapter devoted to each of the three styles of song that she composed in her career: African-American spirituals, jazz/popular songs, and art songs. In addition, the treatise explores Bonds's relationship with the poets of the Harlem Renaissance, and her forays into the musical theatre genre. Musical excerpts and descriptions of many of Bonds's published and unpublished solo vocal works are included. This document will be of benefit to singers, pianists, coaches, and musicologists interested in finding new repertoire with a distinctly American sound, as well as those who are seeking songs composed by American female composers, African-American composers, or art songs that include musical elements drawn from the spiritual or jazz. Over half of Bonds's solo vocal works incorporated the poetry of Langston Hughes. The chapter entitled "The Art Songs: Poets of the Harlem Renaissance" is dedicated to the art song settings of Langston Hughes's poems and also includes one art song setting of a Countée Cullen poem. The chapter entitled "The Art Songs" features settings of texts by Robert Frost, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Margaret Bonds, Marjorie May, Janice Lovoos, and Edmund Penney. Appendix A of this document includes a list of Bonds's solo vocal works. It includes publication information, poet, and dates of composition. Appendix B includes seven digital photographs, including images of Margaret Bonds, Langston Hughes, William Levi Dawson, Florence Beatrice Price, Leonard Harper, Charlotte Holloman, McHenry Boatwright, and Maya Angelou. Many of Margaret Bonds's songs were never published and are located in archival libraries and remain unknown. One purpose of this document is to expose these lesser known pieces to a larger audience, hopefully giving them a deserved place as a significant contribution to the American art song repertoire., Submitted Note: A Treatise submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Music., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2013., Date of Defense: September 20, 2013., Keywords: Art Songs, Jazz Songs, Langston Hughes, Margaret Bonds, Musical Theatre Songs, Spirituals, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Wanda Brister Rachwal, Professor Directing Treatise; Matthew Shaftel, University Representative; Timothy Hoekman, Committee Member; Marcía Porter, Committee Member.
Life and Teaching of Flutist Albert Tipton
Life and Teaching of Flutist Albert Tipton
This treatise examines the life and teaching of the eminent American flutist Albert Tipton. He studied with William Kincaid at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia, was solo flutist with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra and the St. Louis Symphony, and was also a founding member of the Aspen Music Festival where he performed and taught for forty years. Tipton traveled throughout North and South America under the auspices of Columbia Artist Management with his wife, pianist Mary Norris, in duos, trios, and a chamber orchestra. In addition he was an accomplished conductor and composer, writing two pieces for string ensemble and one for flute and string orchestra. He later joined the faculties of the Florida State University in 1968 and the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University in Houston, Texas in 1975. For a number of years Tipton wrote and edited a column in The School Musician Director and Teacher; these writings among others are reviewed in Chapter 3. There he discussed topics such as difference tones, articulation, group lessons, and musical style, to name a few. The subsequent chapter presents quotations from questionnaires that were mailed to former Tipton students. Three aspects of their experience with him were addressed in the survey: Tipton's teaching philosophy, his influence on their lives, and memorable anecdotes. The result is a synopsis of information for generations of flutists to study the life and accomplishments of this most influential performer and teacher., Submitted Note: A Treatise submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Music., Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2006., Date of Defense: April 21, 2006., Keywords: Difference tones, Tipton, Flutist, Teaching, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Frank Kowalsky, Professor Directing Treatise; Seth Beckman, Outside Committee Member; Eva Amsler, Committee Member; Jeff Keesecker, Committee Member.
Life and Teachings of John D. Mohler
Life and Teachings of John D. Mohler
John D. Mohler was born October 30, 1929 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. His earliest teachers include Joseph Leptich, clarinetist of the Lancaster Symphony and Salvadore Colangelo, Principal Clarinetist of the Harrisburg Symphony. After graduating from Litiz High School, Mohler continued his studies at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia studying under the tutelage of Ralph McLane, and served in the United State Marine Band and Orchestra for four years from 1950-1954 in Washington D.C. He received Bachelor of Music, Master of Music and Doctor of Musical Arts in Clarinet Performance degrees from the University of Michigan under the study of William Stubbins. He served on the woodwind faculty at Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, for two years before joining the University of Michigan School of Music faculty as an Assistant Professor of Clarinet and clarinetist in the University Woodwind Quintet in 1962. In addition to his faculty appointment as Professor of Clarinet, he served as the University of Michigan School of Music Wind and Percussion Instruments Department Chair from 1979-1994. In 1979, he received the Harold Haugh Award in Excellence and in 1986 received the University of Michigan School of Music Outstanding Studio Teacher Award. Mohler was also awarded the University of Michigan School of Music Alumni Society Citation of Merit in 1992. The John Mohler Clarinet Scholarship was endowed in 1993 to provide annual scholarships for students majoring in clarinet at the University of Michigan. Mohler retired from the University of Michigan in 1994 and the Regents awarded him Professor Emeritus of Music. In 2003, Mohler was presented the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Clarinet Association. In 2012, Mohler was honored with the University of Michigan Band Alumni Association Lifetime Achievement Award. John Mohler maintains his role as mentor even in retirement and many of his students now hold teaching, performance, and university faculty positions across the country. His ongoing enthusiasm and rapport has affected numerous students and their careers. He possesses the willingness to share his knowledge and expertise in an in-depth and personal manner. John Mohler's biographical and teaching doctrine is underrepresented and recorded, and the personal narrative interviews will help to provide an insight into the life and teachings of John Mohler., Submitted Note: A Treatise submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Music., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester 2015., Date of Defense: November 10, 2015., Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Deborah Bish, Professor Directing Treatise; Rodney Jordan, University Representative; Jonathan Holden, Committee Member; Jeffrey Keesecker, Committee Member.
Life and Times of Adella Hunt Logan
Life and Times of Adella Hunt Logan
Adella Hunt Logan was a woman trapped between two worlds. She was a mulatto who suffered from the pressures and injustices of Jim Crow America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The impact of Adella Logan's life is seen beginning in 1883 in Tuskegee, Alabama. She maintained a large family while making a lasting impact on the Tuskegee community, as well as the women's suffrage movement. Adella often led a life full of contradictions that can be attributed to her social status as well as her mixed racial heritage. Nonetheless, her efforts at advancing the cause of lower-class blacks and the students and teachers at Tuskegee Institute cannot be denied. This study discusses Adella Logan in terms of race, class, and gender. It is the story of an African American woman, an unusual American family, and the world she lived in., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of History in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2012., Date of Defense: October 31, 2012., Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Maxine D. Jones, Professor Directing Dissertation; Maxine Montgomery, University Representative; James P. Jones, Committee Member; Jennifer L. Koslow, Committee Member; Richard Mizelle, Committee Member.
Life in the Banyan Branches
Life in the Banyan Branches
Beyond being just a part of a somewhat interesting local fable, the story of the growth and development of an African American òrìs̱à  devotees in Philadelphia is an Yorùbáland via Cuba. Its adoption by African American devotees is thus a peculiarity that deserves some scholarly attention. Since òrìs̱à tradition is relatively new to African Americans in the United States, having experienced its entrenchment only within the last fifty years or so, its existence among them raises questions: No immediately identifiable whole African or African based spiritual systems have survived in North America with perhaps the exception perhaps of New Orleans Voodoo. Does the youth of the African American òrìs̱à  experience make it inauthentic? Invalid? Most African Americans in the United States cannot precisely trace their ancestry directly to the Yorùbá through conventional genealogical means. Is their embrace of Yorùbá tradition misguided? Most Philadelphia community members have no recent or memorable African ancestry, yet many of them refer to themselves as "Africans." Are they simply mistaken? The version of òrìs̱à  tradition that most Philadelphia devotees practice has found its way to mainland U.S.A. via Cuba, but many practitioners refer to the tradition as one that is "African" and one that is "theirs." What could they possibly mean by this? The existence of the Philadelphia community and others like it raises questions about the concept of Africanity: Just what exactly is it? And why, in 2007, hundreds years after the last African was forcibly brought to U.S. shores, are African Americans still seeking and finding psychological and spiritual significance in Africa and is that Africa "real" or "imagined?" How is it that African and African based religions that have not been observed in any cohesive context by most African Americans for generations still hold significance and evoke familiarity for people who have long been disconnected from Africa? Questions about the nature and evolution of African traditions in the New World also emerge. What happens to locally and ethnically specific traditions when they are applied in contexts that are contrastingly ethnically heterogeneous? What happens to the form and function of these practices, and how is it that they remain thematically similar to their progenitors despite their obvious differences? My research in the Philadelphia community has brought me to the conclusion that African American practitioners of òrìs̱à tradition in Philadelphia, though late to the process of adapting òrìs̱à tradition to themselves, have no less of a valid claim on Lucumí or Yorùbá tradition as their own than their predecessors throughout the diaspora because of their historical position, and their spiritual and social reasons and needs. The historical disposition of African American òrìs̱à devotees along with the spiritual and social reasons and needs responded to by òrìs̱à tradition are in turn supported by group and individual reckonings of identity, historically relevant entitlement, ancestry and descent, and their concepts and interpretations of Africa and African beliefs. In this dissertation I assert several points regarding òrìs̱à tradition in Philadelphia and its adherents. Moving from the widest geographical vantage point to the most local, I first propose that African religions both in Africa and in the diaspora make up one organism. Ideological, ritual, aesthetic and functional aspects of traditions on both sides of the Atlantic clearly evince the interconnectedness of Yorùbáland spiritual tradition its diasporan manifestations. Philadelphia òrìs̱à practice, as one example of the survival process of African traditions in the Americas exemplifies the dynamic nature of òrìs̱à  traditions which continue to evolve and remain relevant to the present while maintaining the integrity of their core. Cyclical in nature, the survival process is one which depends on the depth of the African roots of a large part of African American ethos. This ethos, which has continually made its presence known throughout history in the arts, speech, and ritual life of Americans of African descent, is what shapes these forms and helps to determine the responses of African peoples to their contemporary environment and what helps to distinguish their cultures from those of their neighbors., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Anthropology in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Summer Semester 2009., Date of Defense: September 12, 2008., Keywords: African American Religion, Cultural Anthropology, African American Religion, Orisha, Caribbean Religions, African Diaspora, Orisa, Philadelphia, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Bruce Grindal, Professor Directing Dissertation; Peter Garretson, Outside Committee Member; Joseph Hellweg, Committee Member; Michael Uzendoski, Committee Member.
Life inside the Earth
Life inside the Earth
This thesis presents a social and cultural history of the Koreshan Unity from its official beginnings in the 1880s to its decline in 1908. Founded by eclectic medical doctor Cyrus R. Teed, the Koreshan Unity emerged as yet another utopian experiment during the late-nineteenth century. While many utopian communities have been established in the United States since the colonial period, the Koreshans were a community unique in ideology and social practices. Founded on ancient Christian beliefs, science, and communal standards, the Koreshan Unity has become known throughout the American utopian historical narrative as the utopian community that believed humanity lived inside the earth. While Koreshan beliefs are important in recording the community's history, a more personal history has often been left out of the scholarship on this topic. This thesis seeks to investigate the human side of the Koreshan Unity by tracing the life of Cyrus Teed and providing a glimpse into the everyday lives of the Koreshan members in their settlement in Estero, Florida. Utilizing the Koreshan Unity papers located at the State Archives of Florida, this material culture represents how the Koreshan members tried to realize Teed's and their utopian dream. While the Koreshan Unity began its decline after Teed's death in 1908, its members still portrayed their utopian experiment as a success because they found a haven in the religious and communal opportunities the community supported. Currently, this view of the Koreshan Unity is being preserved at the Koreshan State Historic Site (KSHS), located on the once Koreshan settlement grounds. While scholars who have contributed to the American utopian historical narrative have defined "success" based on numbers and general cultural trends, this thesis proves that only the participants in the movement can truly define what success really means., Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of History in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts., Degree Awarded: Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2010., Date of Defense: Date of Defense: March 22, 2010., Keywords: Cyrus Teed, Koreshan State Historic Site, Utopian Communities, Koreshanity, Cellular Cosmogony, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: Jennifer Koslow, Professor Directing Thesis; Andrew Frank, Committee Member; Molly Oshatz, Committee Member.
Life of Dr. Augustus J. Pearson Jr.
Life of Dr. Augustus J. Pearson Jr.
ADr. Augustus J. Pearson is widely known as choral music educator who made significant contributions to choral music education and influenced many of his students. Moreover, his far-reaching influence as a choral conductor in various institutions, organizations, and communities is noteworthy. This study documents Pearson's contributions within the field of choral music education. Augustus J. Pearson was born in Topeka, Kansas on February 8, 1944 to Jamie and Augustus J. Pearson, Sr. He received his earliest musical training from his mother. He was a graduate of Topeka High School, where he was a member of the band and choir. He also played the organ and the piano. He served as the organist at Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church in Topeka, Kansas, where his father was pastor. He went on to pursue graduate study at the University of Michigan, where he earned a Master of Music degree in Voice. Later, he received a graduate assistantship and university endowment scholarship to complete a Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the University of Kansas. He was a member of the Phi Kappa Lambda National Honor Society, the American Choral Directors Association (ACDA), MENC, and the National Association of Negro Musicians. His college-teaching began in 1974 at Morris College. Afterwards, he taught at Fayetteville State University from 1979-1989 and at the Florida A&M University from 1991-1995., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester 2016., Date of Defense: April 11, 2016., Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: André Thomas, Professor Directing Dissertation; Michelle Stebleton, University Representative; Judy Bowers, Committee Member; Kevin Fenton, Committee Member.
Life of Saint Alexis – critical edition of version M
Life of Saint Alexis – critical edition of version M
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 34-04, Section: A, page: 1908., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1973.
Lifted Up by the Power of the Saints
Lifted Up by the Power of the Saints
This thesis explores the experience of Bulgarian ritual firewalking, prihvanati, from the perspective of two individual nestinari(firewalkers), Ivailo Ayanski and Vesselina Ilieva. Building upon their personal accounts, it focuses on the history and context of the firewalking rite and the transcendent qualities that are at the heart of its performance. With specific attention to music, ritual symbolism, ancient historical roots, and individual accounts of the two firewalkers, I examine the experiential nature of this state of "being lifted up" as an interaction between bodily, musical, and metaphysical experiences. As I argue, in establishing a connection between interdependent and interrelated domains of human experience such as body, music, and divinity, the Bulgarian nestinari formulate a state of wholeness that fosters a renewed cosmological balance and, in turn, individual and communal well-being., Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Music., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2007., Date of Defense: December 15, 2006., Keywords: Music And Ritual, Firewalking, Bulgarian Music, Thracian Rituals And Symbolism, Bulgarian Folklore, Prihvanati, Holotropic Experience, Spirituality And Music, Embodiment, Nestinarstvo, Musical Experience And The Body, Nestinari, Music And The Body, Music And Healing, Transcendence, Music And Dance, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Michael Bakan, Professor Directing Thesis; Benjamin Koen, Committee Member; Michael Uzendoski, Outside Committee Member.
Lifting Me Up or Tearing You down
Lifting Me Up or Tearing You down
Dominance and prestige represent two fundamental strategies people use to navigate social hierarchies. Despite a growing literature on the psychology of dominance- and prestige-oriented leaders, less is known about how those strategies operate at relatively low positions in the hierarchy. The current research investigated whether, among people at lower ranks within a social hierarchy, dominance and prestige would be reflected in relatively high levels of malicious versus benign envy, respectively. Two correlational studies (Studies 1 and 2) demonstrated associations between individual differences in dominance and prestige and the tendency to display benign and malicious envy. Two additional studies used experimental procedures to activate orientations toward dominance and prestige and examine benign and malicious envy in the context of hypothetical scenarios (Study 3) and a laboratory group interaction (Study 4). Across the four studies, individual differences in prestige were positively associated with benign envy, and negatively associated with malicious envy. Individual differences in dominance were positively associated with both malicious and benign envy. Across the two experiments, being in a status hierarchy (intended to prime prestige), relative to a power hierarchy (intended to prime dominance), caused people to display higher levels of benign envy. Across the two experiments, no effects on malicious envy were found. The current research illustrates the value of investigating the psychology of subordinate group members from the perspective of dual strategies theory., A Thesis submitted to the Department of Psychology in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science., April 8, 2020., dominance, envy, hierarchy, power, prestige, status, Includes bibliographical references., Jon K. Maner, Professor Directing Thesis; Andrea L. Meltzer, Committee Member; Jesse R. Cougle, Committee Member.
Light and Dark Side of Positional Indispensability
Light and Dark Side of Positional Indispensability
A playing position that many sports team cannot play without is a goalkeeper. Goalkeepers hold a vital role on their team due to their unique positional requirements such as being the last line of defense and having task and motivational leadership obligations. As a result, it can be argued that they are a highly instrumental or indispensable playing position within their team. It can also be suggested that the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral outcomes goalkeepers might face are related to their indispensability towards their teams' success and the relationship with their team and coach. Thus, the purposes of the present study were to determine if goalkeepers were the most indispensable position in their sport and to understand what makes them indispensable. Additionally, this study examined the outcomes of perceived indispensability for athletes and determined if the team environment acted as a moderator. A sample of 229 athletes from 47 competitive collegiate teams completed an online survey comprised of measures for self-perceptions of indispensability and leadership duties, other perceptions of indispensability and leadership duties of playing positions, effort, enjoyment, concerns over mistakes, perceived pressure, anxiety, excitement, team-cohesion, and the coach-athlete relationship. By conducting multiple quantitative analyses, the results showed that goalkeepers are perceived by their teammates to be the most indispensable due to their role requirements and leadership duties. The results also revealed that the more indispensable the athletes feel, the greater effort, excitement, and enjoyment they have when competing. Athletes' individual attraction and relatedness to their team's tasks and goals was found to moderate the relationships between self-indispensability and athletes' thoughts of concerns over mistakes and perceived pressure. These findings support and add to the definition and outcomes of social indispensability. The present study can provide practitioners and coaches with an increased awareness of the cognitive, behavioral, emotional, and social impact of being a goalkeeper as well as teach them importance of helping athletes improve perceptions of self-indispensability., A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., June 3, 2022., Behaviors, Cognitions, Emotions, Goalkeepers, Indispensability, Sport Psychology, Includes bibliographical references., Svenja Wolf, Professor Directing Dissertation; Joshua Newman, University Representative; Martin Swanbrow Becker, Committee Member; Graig Chow, Committee Member; Beth Phillips, Committee Member.
Light-Weight Filter Design for Sic Power Inverters in Emi Frequency
Light-Weight Filter Design for Sic Power Inverters in Emi Frequency
Wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors such as silicon carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN) devices have received increasing attention over the past two decades due to their better electric and thermal performance. Compared with Si devices, WBG devices have low on-resistance, fast switching speed and high junction temperature capability. These characteristics are beneficial for the efficiency, power density and reliability of power electronics converters. SiC devices mainly target high voltage high power applications (600 V, kilowatts or above). The lower switching loss and higher temperature operation characteristics enable the SiC converter to operate at much higher switching frequency with lower cooling demands. Therefore, the size and weight of the components can be significantly reduced, especially for the power inductors and capacitors. However, the higher switching frequency also makes the electromagnetic interference (EMI) issue more challenging. The electromagnetic noise tends to concentrate in the high frequency range, which overlaps with the EMI frequency (150 kHz to 30 MHz). Thus, higher attenuation is required for the EMI filter design, resulting in larger EMI filter size. Another issue is the high dv/dt associated with WBG devices. In motor drive applications, the high dv/dt will aggravate reflected wave phenomenon, which results in the load voltage being twice of the input voltage, increasing the chance of winding damage. Thus, dv/dt filters are required to reduce the overvoltage at the load terminal. These two issues will offset the benefit of the SiC devices. To reduce the EMI filter size, many methods have been proposed. Compared to the traditional Si inverter, the EMI filter design for SiC inverters has some specific considerations, especially for PV inverters without power inductor. Two approaches are proposed here to reduce the EMI filter size. For DM filter, a notch branch is adopted to reduce the filter size, while the unbalanced Wheatstone bridge is applied to optimize the CM filter design. An active reflected wave canceller (ARWC) is proposed to reduce the overvoltage caused by the reflected wave phenomenon in motor drive application. Compared to other dv/dt filters, this ARWC doesn’t change the dv/dt. A small pulse voltage is inserted into the circuit at each rising / falling edge which breaks the rising / falling edge into two steps. The reflected load voltage caused by each step compensates with each other. Thus, no overvoltage appears at the load terminal. Since the pulse width generated by the canceller is very narrow, which is related to the cable length, the power loss is much smaller compared to passive dv/dt filter. With this principle, an ARWC is designed for two-level inverters in low voltage application. A single phase inverter is built to verify its effectiveness. With the same principle, the ARWC is extended to three-level inverter in Medium Voltage (MV) application. Three different topologies are proposed for the ARWC design. The experiment of the proposed ARWC with a single phase three level inverter is conducted to verify its effectiveness. Finally, conclusions are given and the scope of future work is discussed., A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., March 30, 2021., Common mode, Differential mode, dv/dt filter, EMI filter, Reflected wave canceller, Includes bibliographical references., Hui Li, Professor Co-Directing Dissertation; Fang Z. Peng, Professor Co-Directing Dissertation; Juan Ordonez, University Representative; Jinyeong Moon, Committee Member; Yuan Li, Committee Member.
Lighting the Black actor: A contemporary perspective based on the pioneering work of W. Dury Cox, Jr
Lighting the Black actor: A contemporary perspective based on the pioneering work of W. Dury Cox, Jr
Contemporary text books do not address the subject of lighting for the black actor. Because we are living in a multicultural society, the need to address this topic is becoming more essential. The topic was addressed in 1951 by W. Dury Cox, Jr., in a study done at Tennessee State University, an Historically Black College/University (HBCU). The contributions of theatre educators at HBCUs have been significant, but there is little documentation. Therefore, this study first discusses the historical growth of black theatre at Tennessee State University from its founding until the work of W. Dury Cox, Jr., Using Cox's work as a basis, the study examines the significance and validity of his work. Through questionnaires sent to 273 theatre venues, data was gathered regarding the venue itself, the number of and skin tones of black actors at the venue, the desire for information on the topic, and suggestions for solving problems of lighting for the black actor., An empirical study using a range of dark-complexioned subjects was completed. The subjects were lit with several colors of light. A panel judged the effect of this light on various skin tones. The results were compared with the predictions made by Cox. An objective measurement of the skin tones was made with a chromaticity meter. These measurements were compared with chromaticity data generated from gel media equivalent to those used by Cox. Computer plots of these data showed that the work of Cox was indeed significant, accurate and an important tool for developing strategies for lighting dark-complexioned black actors in today's theatres., Some of the conclusions include the importance of determining the undertones in the complexion; the discovery of the usefulness of Roscolux 02 gel; the general appreciation of pink and lavender gels; the need for interactive discussion of the topic within the profession; and the need to train the eye to note the subtleties of skin undertones., Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 57-03, Section: A, page: 0931., Major Professor: John A. Degen., Thesis (Ph.D.)--The Florida State University, 1996.
Lightning Observations during Tropical Cyclone Intensity Change
Lightning Observations during Tropical Cyclone Intensity Change
Although tropical cyclone (TC) track forecasts have improved considerably in recent years, predicting their intensity continues to be a challenge for both meteorologists and numerical models. A storm's path is primarily influenced greatly by large-scale atmospheric circulations; however, its strength appears to be dominated both by large scale influences and small-scale mechanisms within the storm itself. Most previous research on TC intensity change has employed either numerical modeling or diagnostic approaches using traditional meteorological parameters. Only recently have studies begun to examine electrification as a means for assessing the potential for intensification. Several papers have considered lightning as a proxy for storm intensification, mostly using data from Vaisala's National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and Long-Range Lightning Detection Network (LLDN). However, they mostly have examined individual TCs. This study uses LLDN data to study 45 Atlantic Basin TCs between the years 2004 and 2008. Using the National Hurricane Center's (NHC) best track dataset, lightning data are collected for each TC out to a 500 km radius. Parameters including storm intensity, intensity change, environmental vertical wind shear, storm motion, and flash count are compiled at each NHC best track position. The data at each position then are categorized in several ways, including change in intensity. These methods allow us to examine relations between composites of storm intensity/intensification and convective distribution and frequency. Distributions of cloud-to-ground (CG) flash density with respect to storm motion and speed show that lightning generally is preferred in the TCs' right front and right rear quadrants. Hurricanes produce the greatest flash densities during relatively slow forward motion, while tropical depressions and tropical storms exhibit greater flash densities during faster forward motion. Storm-relative CG flash distributions during weakening, no pressure change, and slow intensification (-5 to 0 hPa 6 h-1) exhibit the same right front and rear quadrant preference as the TC intensity categories. Flash densities are greatest during periods of faster intensification, with a nearly symmetric presentation in the inner core region. When computing flash densities with respect to environmental deep layer wind shear, TCs exhibit a strong preference for lightning in the downshear left and right quadrants of the inner core (0-100 km) and outer rainbands (100-300 km), respectively. Tropical storms and hurricanes best show this relation, with TDs exhibiting a stronger preference for lightning in the downshear right quadrant. Relatively weak wind shear produces greater flash densities in all TC intensity categories. Conversely, storms experiencing strong shear exhibit smaller flash densities in all TC categories due to the disruption of deep convection. During periods of faster intensification, maximum flash densities are located in the inner core, with weakening, no change, and slow intensification periods containing greatest density in the outer rainbands. Average flash rates and flash densities are found to be greatest for weaker TCs (tropical depressions and tropical storms) with smaller flash rates and densities in hurricanes. Considering intensity change, periods of faster intensification exhibit significantly greater flash rates than periods of weakening, no pressure change, and slow intensification. Only weak relations are found between flash rates and intensity change, with the strongest relationship occurring when lightning lags (occurs after) the pressure change period. Lightning preceding (occurring before) the pressure change period exhibits the weakest relationships in all TC intensities. Correlations between CG lightning and sustained wind speed indicate that there is no preferred timing between maximum lightning activity and maximum sustained winds. Instead, maximum correlations occur during periods when greatest lightning activity both precedes and lags the maximum sustained wind. These results indicate that lightning is poorly correlated with intensity change and can be regarded as a poor choice for intensity forecasting., Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science., Degree Awarded: Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2011., Date of Defense: Date of Defense: November 4, 2010., Keywords: Lightning, Tropical Cyclones, Hurricane, Intensity Change, Eyewall, Rainbands, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory committee: Henry Fuelberg, Professor Directing Thesis; Robert Hart, Committee Member; Paul Ruscher, Committee Member.
Lignin-Based Biodegradable Aliphatic Polyester
Lignin-Based Biodegradable Aliphatic Polyester
Lignin is the second most abundant biopolymers and the most sufficient aromatic renewable resource. Because the lignin is biomass (plant)-based, it is intrinsically biodegradable. In the thesis, the biomass-based lignin was covalently linked to another biodegradable polyester, poly(ethylene brassylate) (PEB) which is originated from castor oil. In addition to the biodegradability, lignin used as a hard-segmental component that can provide strong mechanical property of the finally prepared product. The integration of hard lignin and soft PEB controls mechanical properties by changing the ratio between two segments, lignin and PEB. The new lignin-PEB material is synthesized by following three steps: 1) Lignin was chemically functionalized to convert hydroxyl group to carboxylic acid groups by steglich esterification of succinic acid, 2) the PEB was synthesized from ethylene brassylate by strong guanidine base catalyzed ring-opening polymerization. The synthesized linear PEB contains hydroxyl end groups on both terminals. 3) The lignin-based aliphatic polyester was produced by the polycondensation of PEB and carboxylic acid functionalized lignin. The polycondensation is done by using the commonly used industrial catalyst, antimony oxide (Sb2O3) for PET synthesis. Based upon the newly developed synthetic method of lignin-PEB copolymer, the new biodegradable polymer will be used as an alternative clam-nets material in the future., Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of Chemical Engineering in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science., Degree Awarded: Spring Semester 2019., Date of Defense: April 17, 2019., Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Hoyong Chung, Professor Directing Thesis; Yan Li, Committee Member; Daniel Hallinan, Jr., Committee Member.

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