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Theses and Dissertations

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‘Our Bonaparte?’
‘Our Bonaparte?’
"‘Our Bonaparte’: Republicanism, Religion, and Paranoia in New England and the Mid-Atlantic, 1789-1830," examines how American politicians used the idea of Napoleon Bonaparte to reflect (or distort) contemporary political issues in the New England and Mid-Atlantic areas of the United States. It shows how Napoleon became a standard piece of political imagery to either support or attack specific political beliefs and opinions during the first three decades of the nineteenth century, depending on which political faction was discussing Bonaparte at the time., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of History in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester 2016., Date of Defense: October 28, 2016., Keywords: Early Republic America, Napoleon, Paranoia, Perceptions, Religion, Republicanism, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Rafe Blaufarb, Professor Directing Dissertation; Martin Munro, University Representative; Andrew Frank, Committee Member; Maxine Jones, Committee Member; G. Kurt Piehler, Committee Member.
‘Unprecedented’
‘Unprecedented’
The contemporary National Football League (NFL) now sits atop the zenith of American sport business, with unmatched economic growth and popularity. Its success can be measured in terms of revenues, in high television ratings, and in live attendance for its games each week. This dissertation looks into the extent to which the NFL's success--in maintaining a marketable brand image and spectacular corporeal commodity form--is attributable to its distinctive three-pronged system of player governance and punishment: mechanisms for the adjudication of off-field player behavior; mechanisms for the adjudication of on-field player behavior; and mechanisms for the adjudication of player use of proscribed substances. This study will incorporate juridical policy analysis to understand the mechanisms through which such punishment is enacted and enforced, and Foucauldian discourse analysis to disciplinary power imbedded within, and activated by, popular governance rhetoric. It is concluded herein that the NFL's success is attributed to a paradox of liberal economic governance--cartel-structured laissez-faire economic relations--and authoritarian governance of labor activity (on and off the field)., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Sport Management in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2014., Date of Defense: November 10, 2014., Keywords: collective bargaining agreement, discipline, National Football League, policy, risk, spectacle, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Joshua I. Newman, Professor Directing Dissertation; Michael D. Giardina, Committee Member; Ryan M. Rodenberg, Committee Member.
“Laborers Together with God”
“Laborers Together with God”
During World War II, the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940 required conscientious objectors (COs) who opposed any form of military service to perform "work of national importance under civilian direction." The program that carried out this alternative service was the Civilian Public Service (CPS), in which approximately 12,000 pacifists served at 151 camps established across the nation during the war. Some of those camps were in Florida and Mississippi, where CPS men worked with state and local public health authorities to combat diseases that plagued the South's poor, including hookworm and malaria. Though an advance over previous options for COs, CPS was not always well-received, by either the American people or the men who served within it. This dissertation will examine the camps in Florida and Mississippi to assess the success (or lack thereof) of the CPS alternative service program during the war, and also to explore the larger question of how well the United States upholds and protects the right of its citizens (particularly, nonconformist citizens) during a time of national crisis., Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of History in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester 2015., Date of Defense: October 30, 2015., Keywords: Alternative Service, Civilian Public Service, Conscientious Objection, CPS, Selective Service, World War II, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Maxine D. Jones, Professor Directing Dissertation; Maxine L. Montgomery, University Representative; James P. Jones, Committee Member; Jennifer L. Koslow, Committee Member.
“Seeking a New Path”
“Seeking a New Path”
This dissertation investigates the origins and development of a novel communal art form called pasacalle that is associated with the district of Villa El Salvador on the outskirts of Peru's coastal capital city, Lima. The main performers of pasacalle in Villa El Salvador (VES) are youth of rural Andean descent. Most are second generation Limeños whose parents immigrated to the city from the Andean highlands. They belong to a community that has always existed on the lower rungs of Limeño society in terms of socioeconomic status and political agency. The genre of pasacalle, driven by a novel Afro-Brazilian-derived drum music, batucada, has become central to their expressive culture. Pasacalle drumming is not just a form of performance art and entertainment, but also a vehicle for solidifying communal bonds, resisting hegemony and marginalization, asserting rights and power, fighting racism, and mediating the complex sociocultural admixture of localized identity, pride in Andean heritage, aspirations for upward mobility within Limeño society, and expressions of a particular brand of cosmopolitan internationalism that defines contemporary life in Villa El Salvador. It is to the exploration of such issues that this dissertation is addressed., Submitted Note: Dissertation submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2014., Date of Defense: October 31, 2014., Keywords: Activism, Andes, Batucada, Carnival, Pasacalle, Peru, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Michael B. Bakan, Professor Directing Dissertation; Frank Gunderson, Committee Member; Denise Von Glahn, Committee Member.
⁵⁵Mn NMR and Relaxation in Single Crystals of Mn₁₂-Ac and Analogs
⁵⁵Mn NMR and Relaxation in Single Crystals of Mn₁₂-Ac and Analogs
This dissertation presents the first single crystal 55Mn NMR characterization of three compounds related to Mn12-acetate [Mn12O12(O2CCH3)16(H2O)4]× 2CH3COOH-4H2O (henceforth Mn12-Ac) that have come to be known as Single-Molecule Magnets (SMMs). This study was undertaken because they exhibit novel phenomena such as quantum mechanical tunneling of their magnetization (QTM), the origin of which is still not fully understood, and also because they have the potential to form elements of magnetic memory storage at the molecular dimensions. The investigations herein involve studies related to both the bonding as well as spin-dynamics in these compounds to much higher precision than in earlier work. These experiments were made possible by the design of a high frequency goniometer probe and a 3He temperature facility. The first single crystal NMR of any Mn12-based molecule was conducted on [Mn12O12(O2CCH2Br)16(H2O)4]-4CH2Cl2 (Mn12-BrAc). Its 55Mn NMR spectrum, field dependence, angular dependence, and spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) measurements were conducted. Most importantly, data are presented that (a) confirm the alteration of the magnetic core of these molecules when the samples are crushed into powder (a practice used in earlier studies), (b) show the presence of transverse hyperfine fields at the nuclear site, and (c) do not yield any evidence of temperature independent relaxation below 1 K, suggesting that QTM is not the dominant relaxation mechanism at these temperatures, in contrast to earlier studies. Data from single crystals of Mn12-Ac, the most studied SMM, concur with previous x-ray findings in that isomers are present. Such detailed information was not obtainable with powder samples. T1-1 measurements over 400 mK – 1 K indicate the existence of an energy barrier, in this case ~1.65 K, which does not fit the current understanding of the electronic energy diagram. This value supports an earlier, yet unexplained observation of such a level by inelastic neutron scattering. [Mn12O12(O2CCH2But)16(MeOH)4]-MeOH (Mn12-t-Bu), arguably the most interesting SMM in terms of the structure of the NMR peaks, does appear to be a much cleaner sample than Mn12-Ac. Fine structure is noticed, however, in the Mn4+ peak, requiring either the addition of a quadrupole interaction or isomers to explain the splitting. The five resonances that make up the lower frequency Mn3+ group increase in width upon moving to higher frequency, a most unusual result which may also be explained by the presence of isomers. Finally, the bulky ligands contribute to this SMM having the longest relaxation time at low temperature, with no evidence for temperature independence down to 400 mK. Again, evidence was found for a barrier of 1 K. We thus arrive at three major conclusions important to the understanding of SMM systems: 1) Single crystals provide an order-of-magnitude higher spectral resolution than oriented powder samples, but also show that the powdered samples do not represent a statistical average of a crystal, 2) transverse hyperfine fields are present at the Mn4+ site, contradicting early models which predicted an isotropic hyperfine field, and 3) 55Mn spin-lattice times shows no evidence of temperature independent behavior for any of the molecules studied, in contrast to earlier experiments on powdered Mn12-Ac. This observation could be the most important one, as it may result in a reconsideration of the effective spin Hamiltonian for the electronic system if terms must be added to account for an energy level in between the ms = ±10 and ms = ±9 states, at about 1 – 2 K above the ground state, Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy., Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2006., Date of Defense: October 18, 2006., Keywords: Low Temperature, T2, T1, Spin-lattice Relaxation, Mn12, SMMs, SMM, Condensed Matter, Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references., Advisory Committee: Naresh Dalal, Professor Directing Dissertation; James Brooks, Outside Committee Member; Alan Marshall, Committee Member; Arneil Reyes, Committee Member; Oliver Steinbock, Committee Member.

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