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17th-20th Century Correspondence and Documents

Permalink: https://diginole.lib.fsu.edu/islandora/object/fsu:17th-20thCentCorrespondence

The 17th-20th Century Correspondence and Documents consists of letters, documents, and various forms of correspondence relating to notable names and celebrities from between 1618 and 1981. These documents have either been transcribed to or from the personalities in question or have been written in discussion of these individuals. Some documents have been previously digitized as a part of the Edward Lear Papers.

The digital collection is only selections from the physical collection. For more information about the collection and its contents, see the collection's finding aid.

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Letter from Winifred Emery, October 22
Letter from Winifred Emery, October 22
Winifred Emery writes from the Haymarket Theater to regretfully decline the opportunity to work with Mr. Maude of the Actors' Association on December 3rd.
Letter from Young Spirit to George Pearson, February 7
Letter from Young Spirit to George Pearson, February 7
Young Spirit writes to George Pearson offering him a place as Commissioner for enclosing Cubbington field. He states he will try to send Pearson celery on Monday. Notes on verso.
Letter from irene Vanbrugh to Arthur Moreland, November 25, 1922
Letter from irene Vanbrugh to Arthur Moreland, November 25, 1922
Irene Vanbrugh writes to Arthur Moreland gladly accepting an invitation from the Committee for December 16th. Irene Vanbrugh says that her husband is currently out of town so she will have to let Mr. Moreland know if he can come with her or if she will have to bring another guest to the event.
Letter from lady Howard De Walden to Mr. Bulloch, Messrs. Burgoyne and Bosanquet, March 28, 1797
Letter from lady Howard De Walden to Mr. Bulloch, Messrs. Burgoyne and Bosanquet, March 28, 1797
Lady Howard writes on Lord Howard's behalf to Messrs. Burgoyne and Bosanquet, two candidates for county office. Note on verso stating a copy of the correspondence will be sent to Mr. Bulloch to review.
Letter from minister James Foster, April 3, 1749
Letter from minister James Foster, April 3, 1749
Letter to "Reverend and Dear Sir," from minister James Foster discussing monetary transactions. James Foster describes a payment of eight guineas from a man from Cirencester for the addition of eight subscriptions, of which Foster returned eight receipts for.
Letter from with envelope Harriet Beecher Stowe to Oliver Johnson, February 15, 1873
Letter from with envelope Harriet Beecher Stowe to Oliver Johnson, February 15, 1873
Harriet Beecher Stowe tells Oliver Johnson to put her name on the paper, in support of an unnamed cause. She describes that she sent a note to Mr. Garrison to show her support on her own will. Wistfully wishes she was writing by an open window with blossoming orange trees.
Letter in Lord Barrington's name to Prime Minister Grenville, January 31, 1765
Letter in Lord Barrington's name to Prime Minister Grenville, January 31, 1765
The letter suggests to Prime Minister George Grenville that an unemployed individual be considered for a position.
Letter in envelope from William Westall to Edmund Downey, March 23, 1895
Letter in envelope from William Westall to Edmund Downey, March 23, 1895
This letter from William Westall to Edmund Downey is horizontally cut into two sections and is accompanied by its original envelope. Westall describes a fine castle he is staying in that has a view of the Alps. He hopes that Edmund Downey is in good health.
Letter to "Deer Neece," from November 10, 1745
Letter to "Deer Neece," from November 10, 1745
The author of this letter accuses the recipient of slanderous statements and mentions past correspondence where the recipient who demanded money from the author. The author mentions other family members an issues regarding them. A note is made at the end of this letter marking that a copy has been sent to a Mrs. Ball.
Letter to Arthur Moreland, September 24
Letter to Arthur Moreland, September 24
The author of this letter states that they will be engaged on the event described in a previous invitation so they cannot make it. The author signs what looks like their last name with an inscription "not your name," below it.
Letter to Dr. Oliver Huckel from Mary Day Lanier
Letter to Dr. Oliver Huckel from Mary Day Lanier
Letter from Mary Day Lanier to Dr. Oliver Huckel, describing the condition of Mrs. Jacobs. She has fallen and injured her skull and Mrs. Lanier has been helping her family make arrangements for her care.
Letter to Dr. Oliver Huckel from Mary Day Lanier, April 27, 1920
Letter to Dr. Oliver Huckel from Mary Day Lanier, April 27, 1920
Mary Day Lanier sends Dr. Oliver Huckel an editorial from The London Spectator and a copy of Dr. John Walter Wayland's "Sidney Lanier at Rockingham Springs."
Letter to Dr. Oliver Huckel from Mary Day Lanier, April 4, 1918
Letter to Dr. Oliver Huckel from Mary Day Lanier, April 4, 1918
Mary Day Lanier regretfully is unable to participate in the activities Dr. Oliver Huckel has planned for the Mystery Club.
Letter to Dr. Oliver Huckel from Mary Day Lanier, February 10, 1922
Letter to Dr. Oliver Huckel from Mary Day Lanier, February 10, 1922
Mary Day Lanier asks Dr. Oliver Huckel to remain confidential about the subject she is describing. She tells him of Mrs. Hobart Jacobs' extremely poor health and the condition she has dealt with for eighteen years. A friend of hers is looking for five or six people to send money for her care. She is hoping Dr. Huckel could get the attention of a gentleman she has heard of but not been personally acquainted with. She is relying on the help of Dr. Huckel since her own health is quite poor.
Letter to Dr. Oliver Huckel from Mary Day Lanier, July 22, 1920
Letter to Dr. Oliver Huckel from Mary Day Lanier, July 22, 1920
Mary Day Lanier wishes to approach John Wanamaker about buying a poem from Sidney Lanier. She explains her approval of Wanamaker's political activity in Pennsylvania. She has not sold other poems before this, but wishes to use the money to help prepare a grandson for his life's work.
Letter to Dr. Oliver Huckel from Mary Day Lanier, June 28, 1920
Letter to Dr. Oliver Huckel from Mary Day Lanier, June 28, 1920
Mary Day Lanier sends her thanks to Dr. Oliver Huckel and all of his aid. She praises his sermons as a pastor.
Letter to Lou Whitfield Miller
Letter to Lou Whitfield Miller
The author of this letter provides an autobiographical summary for Lou Whitfield Miller and discusses writing serials for periodicals.
Letter to Lou Whitfield Miller, October 17, 1939
Letter to Lou Whitfield Miller, October 17, 1939
The author of this letter is flattered to help Lou Whitfield Miller in her research as long as it is not for commercial use. The author provides autobiographical information and says that they plan to remain on the Florida coast. The correspondent and their partner plan on staying in Florida at least until the war is over.
Letter to Lou Whitfield Miller, September 13, 1939
Letter to Lou Whitfield Miller, September 13, 1939
The author of this letter discusses their story "There Is a Tide" which takes place in Florida. The author went through many Florida natives to make sure that their information and descriptions were accurate. The author was "disgusted so greatly," by "the episode," that they moved their winter home from Miami to Sarasota.
Letter to Mrs. King from Mary Day Lanier, May 6, 1910
Letter to Mrs. King from Mary Day Lanier, May 6, 1910
Mary Day Lanier gratefully acknowledges flowers and a letter Mrs. King sent to her and fondly talks about Easter. She also explains that she has been too ill to write but reads of her letters to her husband, Sidney Lanier, and children. Says that she enjoyed Dr. Huckel's presence.

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