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Debriefing After Traumatic Events for Emergency Nurses

Title: Debriefing After Traumatic Events for Emergency Nurses: A Way to Decrease Secondary Traumatic Stress.
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Name(s): Kahrs, Rebecca, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Research Report
Date Issued: 2019-04-20
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Purpose: To identify if the technique of debriefing after a traumatic event would decrease the secondary traumatic stress (STS) symptoms in emergency nurses.Methods: The use of a pre intervention survey, a debriefing educational intervention and a post intervention survey were utilized to gather data. The pre and post surveys created by Bird, et al., (2004) both utilized the same seventeen questions from the “Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale” for a thorough comparison of the secondary traumatic stress symptoms before and after the use of the debriefing intervention. The debriefing toolkit included a brief STS description, STS symptoms, description of debriefing and top self-care tips. The data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Mann Whitney U test. Results: Forty-one ED nurses participated in the initial surveys and debriefing intervention. The participants decreased to thirty-seven for the post intervention survey. The significant symptoms included feeling emotionally numb, trouble sleeping, discouraged for the future, disturbing dreams, avoiding working with certain patients, the expectation of something bad to happen and finding gaps in memory. This revealed a p-value of 0.007 proving that the data was statistically significant for a decrease in secondary traumatic stress symptoms with the use of the debriefing educational toolkit in emergency department nurses after traumatic events. Discussion: The use of the debriefing educational intervention was found useful in decreasing secondary traumatic stress symptoms in emergency nurses after traumatic events. Emergency nurses found that with the recognition of symptoms and positive coping tools, that they are more successful professionally in dealing with secondary traumatic stress symptoms.Conclusion: Secondary traumatic stress can affect emergency nurses due to the frequent exposure to traumatic events such as deaths, severe injuries and critical illnesses. The recognition of secondary stress and a tool such as debriefing, can decrease and potentially eliminate secondary traumatic stress in emergency nurses that can encourage overall mental well-being improve burnout rates.
Identifier: FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1555813997_69f8e52e (IID)
Keywords: secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, burnout, vicarious trauma, emergency nurse, emergency department, debriefing, sts, ptsd, secondary ptsd
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1555813997_69f8e52e
Host Institution: FSU

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Kahrs, R. (2019). Debriefing After Traumatic Events for Emergency Nurses: A Way to Decrease Secondary Traumatic Stress. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1555813997_69f8e52e