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genetic variant brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) polymorphism interacts with hostile parenting to predict error-related brain activity and thereby risk for internalizing disorders in children.

Title: A genetic variant brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) polymorphism interacts with hostile parenting to predict error-related brain activity and thereby risk for internalizing disorders in children.
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Name(s): Meyer, Alexandria, author
Hajcak, Greg, author
Hayden, Elizabeth, author
Sheikh, Haroon I, author
Singh, Shiva M, author
Klein, Daniel N, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Journal Article
Text
Date Issued: 2018-02-01
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The error-related negativity (ERN) is a negative deflection in the event-related potential occurring when individuals make mistakes, and is increased in children with internalizing psychopathology. We recently found that harsh parenting predicts a larger ERN in children, and recent work has suggested that variation in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene may moderate the impact of early life adversity. Parents and children completed measures of parenting when children were 3 years old (N = 201); 3 years later, the ERN was measured and diagnostic interviews as well as dimensional symptom measures were completed. We found that harsh parenting predicted an increased ERN only among children with a methionine allele of the BDNF genotype, and evidence of moderated mediation: the ERN mediated the relationship between parenting and internalizing diagnoses and dimensional symptoms only if children had a methionine allele. We tested this model with externalizing disorders, and found that harsh parenting predicted externalizing outcomes, but the ERN did not mediate this association. These findings suggest that harsh parenting predicts both externalizing and internalizing outcomes in children; however, this occurs through different pathways that uniquely implicate error-related brain activity in the development of internalizing disorders.
Identifier: FSU_pmch_28427482 (IID), 10.1017/S0954579417000517 (DOI), PMC5752624 (PMCID), 28427482 (RID), 28427482 (EID), S0954579417000517 (PII)
Grant Number: R01 MH069942
Publication Note: This NIH-funded author manuscript originally appeared in PubMed Central at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5752624.
Subject(s): Adult
Alleles
Brain/physiopathology
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor/genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Defense Mechanisms
Electroencephalography
Evoked Potentials/physiology
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Hostility
Humans
Male
Parenting/psychology
Polymorphism, Genetic
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_28427482
Owner Institution: FSU
Is Part Of: Development and psychopathology.
1469-2198
Issue: iss. 1, vol. 30

Choose the citation style.
Meyer, A., Hajcak, G., Hayden, E., Sheikh, H. I., Singh, S. M., & Klein, D. N. (2018). A genetic variant brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) polymorphism interacts with hostile parenting to predict error-related brain activity and thereby risk for internalizing disorders in children. Development And Psychopathology. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_28427482