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What Has the Study of Digital Games Contributed to the Science of Expert Behavior?

Title: What Has the Study of Digital Games Contributed to the Science of Expert Behavior?.
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Name(s): Charness, Neil, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Journal Article
Text
Date Issued: 2017-04-01
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: I review the historical context for modeling skilled performance in games. Using Newell's (1990) concept of time bands for explaining cognitive behavior, I categorize the current papers in terms of time scales, type of data, and analysis methodologies. I discuss strengths and weaknesses of these approaches for describing skill acquisition and why the study of digital games can address the challenges of replication and generalizability. Cognitive science needs to pay closer attention to population representativeness to enhance generalizability of findings, and to the social band of explanation, in order to explain why so few individuals reach expert levels of performance.
Identifier: FSU_pmch_28176450 (IID), 10.1111/tops.12259 (DOI), PMC5409862 (PMCID), 28176450 (RID), 28176450 (EID)
Keywords: Expertise, Generalizability, Information processing theory, Replication, Representativeness, Time band, Time scale
Grant Number: P01 AG017211
Publication Note: This NIH-funded author manuscript originally appeared in PubMed Central at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5409862.
Subject(s): Cognition
Humans
Video Games
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_28176450
Owner Institution: FSU
Is Part Of: Topics in cognitive science.
1756-8765
Issue: iss. 2, vol. 9

Choose the citation style.
Charness, N. (2017). What Has the Study of Digital Games Contributed to the Science of Expert Behavior? Topics In Cognitive Science. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_28176450