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Understanding the Influence of Stigma and Medical Mistrust on Engagement in Routine Healthcare Among Black Women Who Have Sex with Women.

Title: Understanding the Influence of Stigma and Medical Mistrust on Engagement in Routine Healthcare Among Black Women Who Have Sex with Women.
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Name(s): Brenick, Alaina, author
Romano, Kelly, author
Kegler, Christopher, author
Eaton, Lisa A, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Journal Article
Text
Date Issued: 2017-02-01
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: For Black women who have sex with women (BWSW), obtaining routine healthcare can be obstructed by a number of psychosocial barriers, including experiences of stigma, related to both sexual orientation and race, and medical mistrust, both race-based and global. Previous research demonstrates that sexual orientation and race-based stigma, as well as global and race-based medical mistrust, each have a negative impact on health outcomes and engagement in care (EIC) independently. This study addresses gaps in the literature by examining the impact of these psychosocial barriers and their interactions among BWSW, an understudied population. Participants (256 BWSW) were surveyed at a Black Gay Pride festival. Separate generalized linear models assessed the independent and multiplicative effects of participants' self-reported sexual orientation stigma, race-based stigma, race-based medical mistrust, and global medical mistrust related to their engagement in routine physical exams and blood pressure screenings. Prevalence rates of both stigma measures were low, but prevalence rates of global and race-based medical mistrust were high. The results show that experiencing sexual orientation stigma or having race-based medical mistrust predicts significantly lower EIC. Furthermore, the frequencies of obtaining recent physical examinations and blood pressure screenings were significantly related to three- and two-way interactions between stigma and medical mistrust, respectively. There is an urgent need to address the intersectionality of these psychosocial barriers in an effort to increase BWSW's EIC.
Identifier: FSU_pmch_28113005 (IID), 10.1089/lgbt.2016.0083 (DOI), PMC5278794 (PMCID), 28113005 (RID), 28113005 (EID)
Keywords: Barriers to care, Lesbian, Race/ethnicity/culture, Women who have sex with women (WSW)
Grant Number: R01 MH109409
Publication Note: This NIH-funded author manuscript originally appeared in PubMed Central at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5278794.
Subject(s): Adult
African Americans/psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice/ethnology
Homosexuality, Female/ethnology
Homosexuality, Female/psychology
Humans
Linear Models
Physical Examination/psychology
Self Report
Sexual and Gender Minorities/psychology
Social Stigma
Trust/psychology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_28113005
Owner Institution: FSU
Is Part Of: LGBT health.
2325-8306
Issue: iss. 1, vol. 4

Choose the citation style.
Brenick, A., Romano, K., Kegler, C., & Eaton, L. A. (2017). Understanding the Influence of Stigma and Medical Mistrust on Engagement in Routine Healthcare Among Black Women Who Have Sex with Women. Lgbt Health. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_28113005