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Eastern Mediterranean Economic Exchange during the Iron Age

Title: Eastern Mediterranean Economic Exchange during the Iron Age: Portable X-Ray Fluorescence and Neutron Activation Analysis of Cypriot-Style Pottery in the Amuq Valley, Turkey.
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Name(s): Karacic, Steven, author
Osborne, James F, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Journal Article
Text
Date Issued: 2016-11-30
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Two markers of regional exchange in the Eastern Mediterranean during the first millennium BCE are the White Painted and Bichrome Wares from Cyprus's Cypro-Geometric and Cypro-Archaic periods. Although these ceramics are often assumed to be imports from Cyprus, excavations in southern Turkey at sites such as Tarsus-Gözlükule, Kilise Tepe, Sirkeli Höyük, and Kinet Höyük suggest that at least some of this pottery was produced locally, requiring a major revision of our understanding of economic interaction in the Eastern Mediterranean. We employ a combination of portable x-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analysis to investigate the White Painted and Bichrome Wares recovered from Tell Tayinat, Çatal Höyük, and Tell Judaidah, three sites in the Amuq Valley of southeastern Anatolia. Our results demonstrate that a clear geochemical distinction exists between imported and local versions of this pottery. Through comparison with legacy datasets, we locate the likely origin of the imported pottery in the Circum-Troodos sediments of central and southern Cyprus. The secondary and tertiary settlements of Çatal Höyük and Tell Judaidah had access only to this imported material. In contrast, the inhabitants of Tell Tayinat, capital city of the region, consumed both imported and locally produced White Painted and Bichrome Wares. This pattern cannot be explained in purely economic terms whereby the frequency of imports decreases as distance from the point of production increases. Instead, we suggest that elite feasting practices drove demand, resulting in either local potters producing Cypriot-style pottery or Cypriot potters settling in the vicinity of Tell Tayinat. These findings offer new insights into the relationship between historically attested Iron Age kingdoms in southern Turkey and Cyprus and complicate our understanding of exchange in the Eastern Mediterranean during the Iron Age.
Identifier: FSU_pmch_27902729 (IID), 10.1371/journal.pone.0166399 (DOI), PMC5130191 (PMCID), 27902729 (RID), 27902729 (EID), PONE-D-16-37930 (PII)
Publication Note: This NIH-funded author manuscript originally appeared in PubMed Central at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5130191.
Subject(s): Archaeology/methods
Ceramics/analysis
Ceramics/chemistry
Cyprus
History, Ancient
Humans
Neutron Activation Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors/history
Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission
Turkey
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_27902729
Owner Institution: FSU
Is Part Of: PloS one.
1932-6203
Issue: iss. 11, vol. 11

Choose the citation style.
Karacic, S., & Osborne, J. F. (2016). Eastern Mediterranean Economic Exchange during the Iron Age: Portable X-Ray Fluorescence and Neutron Activation Analysis of Cypriot-Style Pottery in the Amuq Valley, Turkey. Plos One. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_27902729