You are here

Chronic sleep deprivation differentially affects short and long-term operant memory in Aplysia.

Title: Chronic sleep deprivation differentially affects short and long-term operant memory in Aplysia.
2 views
1 downloads
Name(s): Krishnan, Harini C, author
Noakes, Eric J, author
Lyons, Lisa C, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Journal Article
Text
Date Issued: 2016-10-01
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The induction, formation and maintenance of memory represent dynamic processes modulated by multiple factors including the circadian clock and sleep. Chronic sleep restriction has become common in modern society due to occupational and social demands. Given the impact of cognitive impairments associated with sleep deprivation, there is a vital need for a simple animal model in which to study the interactions between chronic sleep deprivation and memory. We used the marine mollusk Aplysia californica, with its simple nervous system, nocturnal sleep pattern and well-characterized learning paradigms, to assess the effects of two chronic sleep restriction paradigms on short-term (STM) and long-term (LTM) associative memory. The effects of sleep deprivation on memory were evaluated using the operant learning paradigm, learning that food is inedible, in which the animal associates a specific netted seaweed with failed swallowing attempts. We found that two nights of 6h sleep deprivation occurring during the first or last half of the night inhibited both STM and LTM. Moreover, the impairment in STM persisted for more than 24h. A milder, prolonged sleep deprivation paradigm consisting of 3 consecutive nights of 4h sleep deprivation also blocked STM, but had no effect on LTM. These experiments highlight differences in the sensitivity of STM and LTM to chronic sleep deprivation. Moreover, these results establish Aplysia as a valid model for studying the interactions between chronic sleep deprivation and associative memory paving the way for future studies delineating the mechanisms through which sleep restriction affects memory formation.
Identifier: FSU_pmch_27555235 (IID), 10.1016/j.nlm.2016.08.013 (DOI), PMC5136466 (PMCID), 27555235 (RID), 27555235 (EID), S1074-7427(16)30156-3 (PII)
Keywords: Aplysia, Associative memory, Learning, Sleep deprivation
Grant Number: R21 NS088835
Publication Note: This NIH-funded author manuscript originally appeared in PubMed Central at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5136466.
Subject(s): Animals
Aplysia
Association Learning/physiology
Conditioning, Operant/physiology
Disease Models, Animal
Memory Disorders/etiology
Memory Disorders/physiopathology
Memory, Long-Term/physiology
Memory, Short-Term/physiology
Sleep Deprivation/complications
Sleep Deprivation/physiopathology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_27555235
Host Institution: FSU
Is Part Of: Neurobiology of learning and memory.
1095-9564
Issue: vol. 134 Pt B

Choose the citation style.
Krishnan, H. C., Noakes, E. J., & Lyons, L. C. (2016). Chronic sleep deprivation differentially affects short and long-term operant memory in Aplysia. Neurobiology Of Learning And Memory. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_27555235