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Does Suicidal Ideation Influence Memory? A Study of the Role of Violent Daydreaming in the Relationship Between Suicidal Ideation and Everyday Memory.

Title: Does Suicidal Ideation Influence Memory? A Study of the Role of Violent Daydreaming in the Relationship Between Suicidal Ideation and Everyday Memory.
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Name(s): Chu, Carol, author
Podlogar, Matthew C, author
Rogers, Megan L, author
Buchman-Schmitt, Jennifer M, author
Negley, Jacob H, author
Joiner, Thomas E, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Journal Article
Text
Date Issued: 2016-09-01
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Individuals at risk for suicide experience periods of emotional, enduring, and vivid thoughts about their death by suicide and frequently report violent daydreams about death. Daydreaming is associated with forgetfulness and memory impairments. However, no studies have examined whether suicidal ideation is associated with deficits in everyday memory capabilities and whether violent daydreaming may influence these relationships. This study tested these hypotheses in a sample of 512 young adults. Self-report measures of subjective everyday memory capabilities, violent daydreaming, and suicidal ideation were administered. Results indicated that suicidal ideation and violent daydreaming were each significantly associated with greater impairments in everyday memory retrieval and everyday memory encoding (i.e., attentional tracking). Furthermore, violent daydreaming accounted for the relationship between suicidal ideation and impairments in everyday memory retrieval and memory encoding. Notably, findings remained after controlling for gender and depressive symptoms, a robust predictor of memory impairments. Implications and limitations are discussed.
Identifier: FSU_pmch_26798081 (IID), 10.1177/0145445515625189 (DOI), PMC4956597 (PMCID), 26798081 (RID), 26798081 (EID), 0145445515625189 (PII)
Keywords: Attentional tracking, Memory, Memory encoding, Memory retrieval, Suicidal ideation, Violent daydreaming
Grant Number: T32 MH093311
Publication Note: This NIH-funded author manuscript originally appeared in PubMed Central at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4956597.
Subject(s): Adolescent
Adult
Fantasy
Female
Humans
Imagination/physiology
Male
Memory/physiology
Suicidal Ideation
Violence/psychology
Young Adult
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_26798081
Owner Institution: FSU
Is Part Of: Behavior modification.
1552-4167
Issue: iss. 5, vol. 40

Choose the citation style.
Chu, C., Podlogar, M. C., Rogers, M. L., Buchman-Schmitt, J. M., Negley, J. H., & Joiner, T. E. (2016). Does Suicidal Ideation Influence Memory? A Study of the Role of Violent Daydreaming in the Relationship Between Suicidal Ideation and Everyday Memory. Behavior Modification. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_26798081