You are here

Assessing the Clinical Utility of Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation in the Treatment of Anxious Arousal and Sensory Hypersensitivity

Title: Assessing the Clinical Utility of Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation in the Treatment of Anxious Arousal and Sensory Hypersensitivity: A Targeted Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation Study.
3 views
0 downloads
Name(s): Clancy, Kevin J., author
Li, Wen, (Professor of Psychology), professor directing thesis
Sachs-Ericsson, Natalie J., committee member
Eckel, Lisa A., committee member
Florida State University, degree granting institution
College of Arts and Sciences, degree granting college
Department of Psychology, degree granting department
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Master Thesis
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2017
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource (62 pages)
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The ability of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to augment underlying rhythmic fluctuations of neuronal activity provides meaningful implications in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by aberrations in neural oscillations. However, in evaluating its clinical utility, evidence is lacking for the efficacy of tACS to induce long-term (> 24 hours) plastic changes that translate to lasting behavioral outcomes. Here, we repeatedly administered alpha-frequency tACS across 4 consecutive days in 38 healthy adults to evaluate lasting changes in local alpha power and directed connectivity as well as clinically-relevant indices of anxious arousal and affective sensory processing. Replicating previous findings, participants who received active stimulation (vs. a sham control group) demonstrated transient increases in resting occipito-parietal alpha power that lasted 30 minutes post-stimulation, reflecting acute entrainment to the exogenous electrical stimulation. However, these effects were short-term, returning to baseline levels 24 hours after stimulation. Conversely, long-term increases in intrinsic posteriorfrontal alpha-frequency connectivity emerged and persisted across all 4 days, reflecting plastic-changes in directed cortico-cortical networks. These lasting connectivity changes were paralleled by sustained decreases in anxious arousal and increases in perceived pleasantness of auditory stimuli. These findings suggest that while local oscillatory activity may be constrained by a self-sustaining thalamo-cortical loop that restores cortical oscillations to baseline, long-range oscillatory connectivity may strengthen over time through plastic synaptic changes in intrinsic cortico-cortical networks. The lasting augmentation of this inter-areal oscillatory network via tACS provides meaningful implications in an array of affective and cognitive processes that are orchestrated through the integrity of these global networks. This provides novel extensions of tACS applications, shifting neuromodulatory targets from local oscillations to global oscillatory networks to progress the clinical utility of this technology.
Identifier: FSU_FALL2017_Clancy_fsu_0071N_14146 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of Psychology in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science.
Degree Awarded: Fall Semester 2017.
Date of Defense: September 27, 2017.
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Wen Li, Professor Directing Thesis; Natalie Sachs-Ericsson, Committee Member; Lisa Eckel, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Clinical psychology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_FALL2017_Clancy_fsu_0071N_14146
Owner Institution: FSU

Choose the citation style.
Clancy, K. J. (2017). Assessing the Clinical Utility of Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation in the Treatment of Anxious Arousal and Sensory Hypersensitivity: A Targeted Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation Study. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_FALL2017_Clancy_fsu_0071N_14146