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Relationship among Dysfunctional Career Thoughts, Interest Profile Elevation, and Ability Self-Estimates

Title: The Relationship among Dysfunctional Career Thoughts, Interest Profile Elevation, and Ability Self-Estimates.
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Name(s): Kronholz, Julia, author
Osborn, Debra S., 1968-, professor directing dissertation
Guthrie, Kathy L., university representative
Lenz, Janet G., 1953-, committee member
Sampson, James P., committee member
Florida State University, degree granting institution
College of Education, degree granting college
Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, degree granting department
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Doctoral Thesis
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource (162 pages)
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This study used the Career Thoughts Inventory (CTI; Sampson et al., 1996b) and the Self-Directed Search, 5th Edition (SDS; Holland & Messer, 2013) to examine the relationships among dysfunctional career thoughts, interest profile elevation, and ability self-estimates among a population of individual career counseling clients. The sample included undergraduate, graduate, and community members seeking individual counseling at a university career center (N=86). The CTI was used as a measure dysfunctional career thoughts, specifically, decision-making confusion and commitment anxiety. The SDS was used as a measure of interest profile elevation and ability self-estimates. Multiple regression analyses found significant relationships among decision-making confusion, commitment anxiety, interest profile elevation, and ability self-estimates. Results indicated that dysfunctional career thoughts captured 16% of variance in interest profile elevation and 12.6% of variance in ability self-estimates. A MANOVA analysis was performed to determine differences in level of dysfunctional career thoughts (high, moderate, and low) in terms of interest profile elevation and ability self-estimates. Results revealed non-significant differences and thus further analyses were not performed. A discussion of the findings is offered, which includes examination of the results and possible confounds or limitations. Implications for theory, research, practice and policy are discussed, in addition to suggestions for future research.
Identifier: FSU_SUMMER2017_Kronholz_fsu_0071E_13674 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems in partial fulfillment of the Doctor of Philosophy.
Degree Awarded: Fall Semester 2016.
Date of Defense: December 7, 2016.
Keywords: ability self estimates, Career Thoughts Inventory, dysfunctional career thoughts, interest profile elevation, Self Directed Search
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Debra Osborn, Professor Directing Dissertation; Kathy Guthrie, University Representative; Janet Lenz, Committee Member; James Sampson, Jr., Committee Member.
Subject(s): Psychology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_SUMMER2017_Kronholz_fsu_0071E_13674
Owner Institution: FSU

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Kronholz, J. (2016). The Relationship among Dysfunctional Career Thoughts, Interest Profile Elevation, and Ability Self-Estimates. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_SUMMER2017_Kronholz_fsu_0071E_13674