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Loss of function of the Cik1/Kar3 motor complex results in chromosomes with syntelic attachment that are sensed by the tension checkpoint.

Title: Loss of function of the Cik1/Kar3 motor complex results in chromosomes with syntelic attachment that are sensed by the tension checkpoint.
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Name(s): Jin, Fengzhi, author
Liu, Hong, author
Li, Ping, author
Yu, Hong-Guo, author
Wang, Yanchang, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Journal Article
Text
Date Issued: 2012-02-01
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The attachment of sister kinetochores by microtubules emanating from opposite spindle poles establishes chromosome bipolar attachment, which generates tension on chromosomes and is essential for sister-chromatid segregation. Syntelic attachment occurs when both sister kinetochores are attached by microtubules from the same spindle pole and this attachment is unable to generate tension on chromosomes, but a reliable method to induce syntelic attachments is not available in budding yeast. The spindle checkpoint can sense the lack of tension on chromosomes as well as detached kinetochores to prevent anaphase onset. In budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tension checkpoint proteins Aurora/Ipl1 kinase and centromere-localized Sgo1 are required to sense the absence of tension but are dispensable for the checkpoint response to detached kinetochores. We have found that the loss of function of a motor protein complex Cik1/Kar3 in budding yeast leads to syntelic attachments. Inactivation of either the spindle or tension checkpoint enables premature anaphase entry in cells with dysfunctional Cik1/Kar3, resulting in co-segregation of sister chromatids. Moreover, the abolished Kar3-kinetochore interaction in cik1 mutants suggests that the Cik1/Kar3 complex mediates chromosome movement along microtubules, which could facilitate bipolar attachment. Therefore, we can induce syntelic attachments in budding yeast by inactivating the Cik1/Kar3 complex, and this approach will be very useful to study the checkpoint response to syntelic attachments.
Identifier: FSU_pmch_22319456 (IID), 10.1371/journal.pgen.1002492 (DOI), PMC3271067 (PMCID), 22319456 (RID), 22319456 (EID), PGENETICS-D-11-01695 (PII)
Grant Number: R15 GM097326, R15GM097326-01
Publication Note: This NIH-funded author manuscript originally appeared in PubMed Central at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3271067.
Subject(s): Anaphase/genetics
Aurora Kinases
Chromosome Segregation/genetics
Chromosomes/genetics
Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal
Kinetochores
M Phase Cell Cycle Checkpoints/genetics
Microtubule Proteins/genetics
Microtubule-Associated Proteins/genetics
Microtubules/genetics
Mitosis/genetics
Mutation
Nuclear Proteins/genetics
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics
Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/metabolism
Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genetics
Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/genetics
Sister Chromatid Exchange/genetics
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_22319456
Owner Institution: FSU
Is Part Of: PLoS genetics.
1553-7404
Issue: iss. 2, vol. 8

Choose the citation style.
Jin, F., Liu, H., Li, P., Yu, H. -G., & Wang, Y. (2012). Loss of function of the Cik1/Kar3 motor complex results in chromosomes with syntelic attachment that are sensed by the tension checkpoint. Plos Genetics. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_pmch_22319456