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What Predicts the Moralized Perception of Self-Sacrifice?

Title: What Predicts the Moralized Perception of Self-Sacrifice?: Clarifying the Roles of Fusion and Moral Dilemma Decision-Making.
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Name(s): Polacek, David Aaron, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Bachelor Thesis
Date Issued: 2017-04-28
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Why do people sacrifice themselves for others? According to identity fusion theory, people are most willing to sacrifice themselves to save others when they experience a visceral sense of oneness with the group. This entails strong emotional concern for group member well-being. Conversely, people low in fusion may still occasionally choose to sacrifice for the group, but not for emotional reasons—instead, because they endorse abstract generalized utilitarian ethical principles that require people to maximize overall outcomes for others regardless of group membership. Although initial evidence supports this claim, it is restricted to self-report measures. The current work applies process dissociation to assess individual differences in affective reactions to harm and cognitive evaluations of outcomes on classic moral dilemmas where harming a stranger saves other strangers. I will examine whether these processes predict the moralized perception of self-sacrifice.
Identifier: FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1493681737 (IID)
Keywords: Fusion, Dilemmas, Self-sacrifice
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1493681737
Owner Institution: FSU

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Polacek, D. A. (2017). What Predicts the Moralized Perception of Self-Sacrifice?: Clarifying the Roles of Fusion and Moral Dilemma Decision-Making. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1493681737