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Protein-Pacing from Food or Supplementation Improves Physical Performance in Overweight Men and Women

Title: Protein-Pacing from Food or Supplementation Improves Physical Performance in Overweight Men and Women: The PRISE 2 Study.
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Name(s): Arciero, Paul J., author
Edmonds, Rohan C., author
Bunsawat, Kanokwan, author
Gentile, Christopher L., author
Ketcham, Caitlin, author
Darin, Christopher, author
Renna, Mariale, author
Zheng, Qian, author
Zhang, Jun Zhu, author
Ormsbee, Michael J., author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Date Issued: 2016-05
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: We recently reported that protein-pacing (P; six meals/day @ 1.4 g/kg body weight (BW), three of which included whey protein (WP) supplementation) combined with a multi-mode fitness program consisting of resistance, interval sprint, stretching, and endurance exercise training (RISE) improves body composition in overweight individuals. The purpose of this study was to extend these findings and determine whether protein-pacing with only food protein (FP) is comparable to WP supplementation during RISE training on physical performance outcomes in overweight/obese individuals. Thirty weight-matched volunteers were prescribed RISE training and a P diet derived from either whey protein supplementation (WP, n = 15) or food protein sources (FP, n = 15) for 16 weeks. Twenty-one participants completed the intervention (WP, n = 9; FP, n = 12). Measures of body composition and physical performance were significantly improved in both groups (p < 0.05), with no effect of protein source. Likewise, markers of cardiometabolic disease risk (e. g., LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, glucose, insulin, adiponectin, systolic blood pressure) were significantly improved (p < 0.05) to a similar extent in both groups. These results demonstrate that both whey protein and food protein sources combined with multimodal RISE training are equally effective at improving physical performance and cardiometabolic health in obese individuals.
Identifier: FSU_libsubv1_wos_000378780900049 (IID), 10.3390/nu8050288 (DOI)
Keywords: body-composition, cardiometabolic-risk, obese adults, perivascular adipocytes, physical performance, PRISE exercise training, proinflammatory phenotype, protein-pacing, randomized controlled-trial, resistance exercise, risk-factors, skeletal-muscle, weight-loss, whey-protein
Publication Note: The publisher’s version of record is available at http://www.dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu8050288
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_libsubv1_wos_000378780900049
Host Institution: FSU
Is Part Of: Nutrients.
2072-6643
Issue: iss. 5, vol. 8

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Arciero, P. J., Edmonds, R. C., Bunsawat, K., Gentile, C. L., Ketcham, C., Darin, C., … Ormsbee, M. J. (2016). Protein-Pacing from Food or Supplementation Improves Physical Performance in Overweight Men and Women: The PRISE 2 Study. Nutrients. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_libsubv1_wos_000378780900049