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Exploring the Relationships Among Self-Regulation, Acculturation, and Academic and Social Integration for Asian International Doctoral Students

Title: Exploring the Relationships Among Self-Regulation, Acculturation, and Academic and Social Integration for Asian International Doctoral Students.
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Name(s): Wu, Yi-Chin, author
Jones, Tamara Bertrand, professor directing dissertation
Roehrig, Alysia D., university representative
Hu, Shouping, committee member
Cox, Bradley E., committee member
Florida State University, degree granting institution
College of Education, degree granting college
Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, degree granting department
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2015
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
Physical Form: online resource
Extent: 1 online resource (229 pages)
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This dissertation examined the relationship between Asian international doctoral students' self-regulation on academic and social integration and explored how acculturation tendencies function as a mediator between self-regulated learning and academic and social integration. Previous research has indicated that self-regulated learning has a great influence on students' learning. Little research, however, has been undertaken directly regarding international students or doctoral students. Despite the fact that the number of international students has increased annually, there has been little research focused on how acculturation tendencies can influence the learning process, especially for Asian students. The framework of this study integrated self-regulated learning theory, acculturation, and academic and social integration perspectives to explore the relationships among Asian international doctoral students' learning experiences. It was proposed that students' self-regulated learning relates to their academic and social integration and that acculturation mediates between self-regulated learning and academic and social integration. This dissertation adopted a sequential explanatory mixed methodology, using an online survey to collect quantitative data in the first phase with follow-up interviews to collect qualitative data at the second phase. The researcher-developed survey, the Asian Doctoral Students' Self-Regulated Learning Survey, was created to gauge the participants' self-regulation, acculturation tendencies, and academic and social integration within their doctoral programs. A pilot study was conducted. There were 435 doctoral students who participated in the first formal survey phase followed by 12 interviewees with different acculturation tendencies in the second phase. After the data were collected, mediation tests and multiple regressions were used to examine the relationships between self-regulated learning, acculturation, and academic and social integration. A cross-case analysis was also employed to compare commonalities and differences in learning difficulties and strategies among acculturation tendencies in order to mobilize case knowledge for broader educational applications. Findings from this study showed that Asian international doctoral students' self-regulated learning related to their academic and social integration, but acculturation tendencies served as a mediator between self-regulated learning and academic and social integration. Students with different acculturation tendencies provided valuable accounts of their challenges and strategies during their time in the United States. Findings from this research help clarify today's Asian doctoral students' learning experiences in the United States. This is an important contribution to the existing literature about self-regulated learning, acculturation, and doctoral students' academic and social integration. Educators, policy makers, international centers, and higher education personnel can better understand the international student population and develop effective programs and policies to maximize international students' impact and improve their integration in their doctoral programs and institutions.
Identifier: FSU_2016SP_Wu_fsu_0071E_12957 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.
Degree Awarded: Fall Semester 2015.
Date of Defense: December 7, 2015.
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Tamara Bertrand Jones, Professor Directing Dissertation; Alysia Roehrig, University Representative; Shouping Hu, Committee Member; Brad Cox, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Education, Higher
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_2016SP_Wu_fsu_0071E_12957
Owner Institution: FSU

Choose the citation style.
Wu, Y. -C. (2015). Exploring the Relationships Among Self-Regulation, Acculturation, and Academic and Social Integration for Asian International Doctoral Students. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_2016SP_Wu_fsu_0071E_12957