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Relationship Between Resident Assistants' Perceived Competency and Knowledge of Suicide, and Their Intervention Behaviors

Title: The Relationship Between Resident Assistants' Perceived Competency and Knowledge of Suicide, and Their Intervention Behaviors.
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Name(s): Ritts, Samantha Marie, author
Swanbrow Becker, Martin Alan, professor directing thesis
Prevatt, Frances F., committee member
Roehrig, Alysia D., committee member
Florida State University, degree granting institution
College of Education, degree granting college
Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, degree granting department
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2016
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource (54 pages)
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The transition from high school to college represents a major source of distress as students experience the challenges of academic demands, changing relationships, and scheduling responsibilities. The impact of these stressors may affect a student's academic achievement, self-esteem, physical health, and mental health, with suicide believed to be a second leading cause of death among this population. The Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidality indicates the importance of social connection in reducing the occurrence of suicidal desires and behaviors, stating that experiences of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness are causally related to suicide risk. Resident Assistants (RAs) function as a persistent social connection in the lives of student residents. As research supports, RAs often act as gatekeepers to residents, and have recently been used in this role to support suicide prevention on college campuses. This study analyzes the intervention behaviors of RAs during the semester following the training. Using a university-wide, de-identified data set of 81 campus RAs, this project seeks to determine how an RA's perceived competency and knowledge following a suicide prevention training predicts the number of residents believed by an RA to have had thoughts of suicide, RA intervention, and the frequency by which RAs wished they had offered support in the subsequent semester. Results of this study found no significant relationship between perceived competence and knowledge post-training and intervention behaviors post-semester. Despite a lack of a significant relationship between variables, results are valuable in demonstrating the need to improve RA suicide prevention training program quality and frequency, and to consider other potential mediating variables which might explain intervention behaviors.
Identifier: FSU_2016SP_Ritts_fsu_0071N_13235 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems in partial fulfillment of the Master of Science.
Degree Awarded: Spring Semester 2016.
Date of Defense: April 4, 2016.
Keywords: gatekeeper, intervention, prevention, resident assistants, suicide, suicide prevention training
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Martin Swanbrow Becker, Professor Directing Thesis; Frances Prevatt, Committee Member; Alysia Roehrig, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Psychology
Social psychology
Sociology -- Research
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_2016SP_Ritts_fsu_0071N_13235
Owner Institution: FSU

Choose the citation style.
Ritts, S. M. (2016). The Relationship Between Resident Assistants' Perceived Competency and Knowledge of Suicide, and Their Intervention Behaviors. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_2016SP_Ritts_fsu_0071N_13235