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Beyond knowledge and skills

Title: Beyond knowledge and skills: Discursive construction of civic identity in the world history classroom.
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Name(s): Myers, John P., author
McBride, Chantee, author
Anderson, Michelle, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Date Issued: 2015-07-01
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The research presented in this article investigates the role of classroom discussions for supporting students’ ongoing identity work during the study of global issues. Civic identity is theorized as a socially constructed process in which individuals become associated as a particular type of citizen created through social interactions in a given context. The findings revealed that classroom discussion focused on supporting identity work facilitated students to critique civic discourses and to negotiate global civic identities within the classroom relations of power that privilege certain positions. The findings suggest conceptualizing civic identity as a fundamentally unresolved process of navigating multiple ways of being a citizen that are ongoing and contingent. However, the students did not discard their national identities in favor of global ones. Instead, they made sense of diverse responsibilities by considering the moral implications of remaining loyal to the nation. Thus, rather than imposing citizenship as a fixed, singular narrative, we suggest that educators support the exploration of diverse moral and political ways of being citizens in the world. Although there are promising results for civic identity work, the findings were less sanguine for a commitment to civic engagement.
Translational Abstract: This study investigated the role of classroom discussion on global issues in supporting the construction of civic identities among U. S. students. Results showed that classroom discussions allowed students to remain critical of power relations while exploring issues of global identity and civics. The article suggested that, even though students did not abandon their national identities, the construction of civic identities is fundamentally indefinite and complex. Although these results were promising for civic identity work, they were less promising for a commitment to civic engagement. Implications for the future of citizenship education were also discussed.
Identifier: FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1459260842 (IID), 10.1080/03626784.2015.1011045 (DOI)
Keywords: Global citizenship education, Civic identity, Classroom discussion, Globalization
Publication Note: Publisher's version of record available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03626784.2015.1011045
Preferred Citation: Myers, J.P., McBride, C., and Anderson, M. (2015). Beyond knowledge and skills: Discursive construction of civic identity in the world history classroom. Curriculum Inquiry, 45(2), 198-218.
Grant Number: Spencer Foundation, grant number 200800147
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1459260842
Owner Institution: FSU
Is Part Of: Curriculum Inquiry.
Issue: iss. 2, vol. 45

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Myers, J. P., McBride, C., & Anderson, M. (2015). Beyond knowledge and skills: Discursive construction of civic identity in the world history classroom. Curriculum Inquiry. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_libsubv1_scholarship_submission_1459260842