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Beatboxing and the Flute

Title: Beatboxing and the Flute: Its History, Repertoire, and Pedagogical Importance.
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Name(s): Kuhns, Christopher, author
Amsler, Eva, professor directing treatise
Mathes, James, university representative
Meighan, Patrick, committee member
Bish, Deborah, committee member
Trujillo, Valerie, committee member
College of Music, degree granting department
Florida State University, degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: "Beatbox Flute" is a contemporary technique in which a performer creates complex polyphonic percussive effects while playing the flute. Developed in the early 2000s, it has only recently begun to gain widespread acceptance. The current popularity of beatboxing on the flute, especially with the younger generation, can prove to be an effective vehicle for delivering a variety of pedagogical concepts, including support, breathing, rhythm, tone, and compound melodies. In the flute choir setting, it is also a wonderful way to provide interest in an ensemble that is traditionally viewed as old fashioned or "boring" to a younger generation. This document begins with an examination of vocal beatboxing and its transference to flute. Non-lexical vocables and onomatopoeic percussive syllables have long been used in many different musical cultural traditions. Vocal beatboxing expands on these effects by deliberately masking vocal cues and more closely imitates the effects of electronic drum machines (or beat boxes). The use of percussive articulatory effects in flute music is not a new phenomenon, compositions featuring similar techniques have existed for decades. The style of playing that has come to be called beatbox flute has taken these earlier procedures and added to them with the inclusion of bass drum effects and inhaled sounds. Important pioneers in developing the field of beatbox Flute include Tim Barsky and Greg Pattillo; their specific contributions and innovations are discussed throughout this text. The current notated repertoire for beatbox flute is sparse. Background information of the available repertoire and a brief description of these works are discussed in chapter two. Compositions/arrangements examined include those by Randall Woolf, Greg Pattillo, Project Trio, Dirko Juchem, Andrea La Rose, Tilmann Denhard, and the author. In an effort to increase the number of compositions that feature beatbox flute, the appendix includes two new works: an arrangement of Joseph Bodin de Boismortier's Solo Suite no. 5, mov. 4 for solo beatbox flute, and Camille Saint-Saëns Dance Bacchanale from the opera Samson et Dalila for beatbox flute choir. Chapter three focuses on the different beatbox flute techniques and attempts to provide an exact phonetic transcription of all effects currently used in the repertoire. The effects are grouped by the category of instrument that they are intended to represent and each effect is described in detailed prose and is compared to similar effects. All effects are presented in International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) shorthand and recorded examples are included. As with many extended techniques, there is not a standard way to notate beatbox effects in music. Chapter four compares the different notational systems currently in use by composers of vocal beatbox and flute beatbox works. A compilation of all effects currently in use by different composers/arrangers and their differing notational short-hands is also included. The potential pedagogical uses of beatbox flute within the collegiate curriculum are discussed in chapter five. Increased kinesthetic awareness and increased focus and concentration are emphasized. It can be used to strengthen rhythmic stability and as a solmization system can provide a fun and engaging experience for today's students. When applied to earlier music, beatbox effects can amplify (or reshape) important concepts such as compound melodies or metric hierarchy. Finally, its use within the flute choir setting can serve as a tool for audience development and to provide contrast to the homogeneity of the traditional ensemble.
Identifier: FSU_migr_etd-8827-P (IID)
Submitted Note: A Treatise submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Music.
Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2014.
Date of Defense: April 2, 2014.
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Eva Amsler, Professor Directing Treatise; James Mathes, University Representative; Patrick Meighan, Committee Member; Deborah Bish, Committee Member; Valerie Trujillo, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Music
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-8827-P
Host Institution: FSU

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Kuhns, C. (2014). Beatboxing and the Flute: Its History, Repertoire, and Pedagogical Importance. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-8827-P

Title: Beatboxing and the Flute: Its History, Repertoire, and Pedagogical Importance.
Name(s): Kuhns, Christopher, author
Amsler, Eva, professor directing treatise
Mathes, James, university representative
Meighan, Patrick, committee member
Bish, Deborah, committee member
Trujillo, Valerie, committee member
College of Music, degree granting department
Florida State University, degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2014
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: "Beatbox Flute" is a contemporary technique in which a performer creates complex polyphonic percussive effects while playing the flute. Developed in the early 2000s, it has only recently begun to gain widespread acceptance. The current popularity of beatboxing on the flute, especially with the younger generation, can prove to be an effective vehicle for delivering a variety of pedagogical concepts, including support, breathing, rhythm, tone, and compound melodies. In the flute choir setting, it is also a wonderful way to provide interest in an ensemble that is traditionally viewed as old fashioned or "boring" to a younger generation. This document begins with an examination of vocal beatboxing and its transference to flute. Non-lexical vocables and onomatopoeic percussive syllables have long been used in many different musical cultural traditions. Vocal beatboxing expands on these effects by deliberately masking vocal cues and more closely imitates the effects of electronic drum machines (or beat boxes). The use of percussive articulatory effects in flute music is not a new phenomenon, compositions featuring similar techniques have existed for decades. The style of playing that has come to be called beatbox flute has taken these earlier procedures and added to them with the inclusion of bass drum effects and inhaled sounds. Important pioneers in developing the field of beatbox Flute include Tim Barsky and Greg Pattillo; their specific contributions and innovations are discussed throughout this text. The current notated repertoire for beatbox flute is sparse. Background information of the available repertoire and a brief description of these works are discussed in chapter two. Compositions/arrangements examined include those by Randall Woolf, Greg Pattillo, Project Trio, Dirko Juchem, Andrea La Rose, Tilmann Denhard, and the author. In an effort to increase the number of compositions that feature beatbox flute, the appendix includes two new works: an arrangement of Joseph Bodin de Boismortier's Solo Suite no. 5, mov. 4 for solo beatbox flute, and Camille Saint-Saëns Dance Bacchanale from the opera Samson et Dalila for beatbox flute choir. Chapter three focuses on the different beatbox flute techniques and attempts to provide an exact phonetic transcription of all effects currently used in the repertoire. The effects are grouped by the category of instrument that they are intended to represent and each effect is described in detailed prose and is compared to similar effects. All effects are presented in International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) shorthand and recorded examples are included. As with many extended techniques, there is not a standard way to notate beatbox effects in music. Chapter four compares the different notational systems currently in use by composers of vocal beatbox and flute beatbox works. A compilation of all effects currently in use by different composers/arrangers and their differing notational short-hands is also included. The potential pedagogical uses of beatbox flute within the collegiate curriculum are discussed in chapter five. Increased kinesthetic awareness and increased focus and concentration are emphasized. It can be used to strengthen rhythmic stability and as a solmization system can provide a fun and engaging experience for today's students. When applied to earlier music, beatbox effects can amplify (or reshape) important concepts such as compound melodies or metric hierarchy. Finally, its use within the flute choir setting can serve as a tool for audience development and to provide contrast to the homogeneity of the traditional ensemble.
Identifier: FSU_migr_etd-8827 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Treatise submitted to the College of Music in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Music.
Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2014.
Date of Defense: April 2, 2014.
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Eva Amsler, Professor Directing Treatise; James Mathes, University Representative; Patrick Meighan, Committee Member; Deborah Bish, Committee Member; Valerie Trujillo, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Music
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-8827
Host Institution: FSU