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Predictive Ability of Thwarted Belongingness and Perceived Burdensomeness versus Culture-Specific Indicators of Suicidality

Title: The Predictive Ability of Thwarted Belongingness and Perceived Burdensomeness versus Culture-Specific Indicators of Suicidality.
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Name(s): Hollar, Daniel L. (Daniel Leighton), 1979-, author
Joiner, Thomas E., Jr., professor directing dissertation
Teasly, Martell L., university representative
Akbar, Na'im, committee member
Licht, Mark, committee member
Plant, Ashby, committee member
Department of Psychology, degree granting department
Florida State University, degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2010
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Introduction: The purpose of this study is to examine the connection between culture and psychopathology to determine if, belongingness and burdensomeness are more predictive of suicidality risk than multicultural inclusiveness, African self-fortification and acculturative stress among college students of African descent from two culturally distinct universities. The main hypothesis is that among individuals of African descent thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness and the interaction between the two will be more significant than multicultural inclusiveness, African self-fortification, acculturative stress, or those two-way interaction combinations. Methods: Approximately 170 consenting African American male and female undergraduate college students from two southeastern State universities participated in this study. Suicidality was assessed using the Beck Suicide Scale and depressive symptoms using the Beck Depression Inventory. Results: Hypotheses were supported. Regression 1 indicated the main effect of ethnicity on suicidality was non-significant and ethnicity did not significantly moderate the relationship between belongingness or burdensomeness and Suicidality. Regression 2 indicated university setting did not significantly moderate the relationship between Suicidality and belongingness or burdensomeness. Regression 3 indicated that the two-way interaction between burdensomeness and belongingness was of greater significance than culture-specific variables in predicting suicidality among individuals of African descent. Conclusions: Perceived burdensomeness and the belongingness X burdensomeness interaction are robust predictors of suicidality among individuals of African descent. Clinical implications are discussed.
Identifier: FSU_migr_etd-3976 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Psychology in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.
Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2010.
Date of Defense: June 28, 2010.
Keywords: African Descent, Burdensomeness, African American, Suicidality, Suicide, Belongingness, Acculturative Stress, Multicultural Inclusiveness, African Self-fortification
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Thomas E. Joiner, Jr., Professor Directing Dissertation; Martell L. Teasly, University Representative; Na'im Akbar, Committee Member; Mark Licht, Committee Member; Ashby Plant, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Psychology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3976
Owner Institution: FSU

Choose the citation style.
Hollar, D. L. (D. L. ). (2010). The Predictive Ability of Thwarted Belongingness and Perceived Burdensomeness versus Culture-Specific Indicators of Suicidality. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3976