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Perceived Weight Discrimination and Obesity

Title: Perceived Weight Discrimination and Obesity.
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Name(s): Sutin, Angelina, author
Terracciano, Antonio, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: serial
Date Issued: 2013
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Weight discrimination is prevalent in American society. Although associated consistently with psychological and economic outcomes, less is known about whether weight discrimination is associated with longitudinal changes in obesity. The objectives of this research are (1) to test whether weight discrimination is associated with risk of becoming obese (Body Mass Index≥30; BMI) by follow-up among those not obese at baseline, and (2) to test whether weight discrimination is associated with risk of remaining obese at follow-up among those already obese at baseline. Participants were drawn from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative longitudinal survey of community-dwelling US residents. A total of 6,157 participants (58.6% female) completed the discrimination measure and had weight and height available from the 2006 and 2010 assessments. Participants who experienced weight discrimination were approximately 2.5 times more likely to become obese by follow-up (OR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.58–4.08) and participants who were obese at baseline were three times more likely to remain obese at follow up (OR = 3.20, 95% CI = 2.06–4.97) than those who had not experienced such discrimination. These effects held when controlling for demographic factors (age, sex, ethnicity, education) and when baseline BMI was included as a covariate. These effects were also specific to weight discrimination; other forms of discrimination (e.g., sex, race) were unrelated to risk of obesity at follow-up. The present research demonstrates that, in addition to poorer mental health outcomes, weight discrimination has implications for obesity. Rather than motivating individuals to lose weight, weight discrimination increases risk for obesity.
Identifier: FSU_migr_mhs-0009 (IID), 10.1371/journal.pone.0070048 (DOI)
Keywords: obesity, discrimination, BMI, bias
Note: Originally published in PLoS One.
Citation: Sutin AR, Terracciano A (2013) Perceived Weight Discrimination and Obesity. PLoS ONE 8(7): e70048. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0070048
Subject(s): Human behavior
Mental health
Health
Medicine
Medical sciences
Social psychiatry
Diseases
Metabolism -- Disorders
Psychology
Public health
Links: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0070048
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_mhs-0009
Host Institution: FSU
Is Part of Series: Behavioral Sciences and Social Medicine Faculty Publications.
Is Part Of: PLoS One.
Issue: 7, 8

Choose the citation style.
Sutin, A., & Terracciano, A. (2013). Perceived Weight Discrimination and Obesity. Plos One. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0070048