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Female and Male Adolescents' Subjective Orientations to Mathematics and the Influence of Those Orientations on Postsecondary Majors

Title: Female and Male Adolescents' Subjective Orientations to Mathematics and the Influence of Those Orientations on Postsecondary Majors.
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Name(s): Perez-Felkner, Lara, author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: serial
Date Issued: 2012
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: Although important strides towards gender parity have been made in several scientific fields, females remain underrepresented in the physical sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer sciences (PEMC). This study examines the effects of adolescents' subjective orientations, course taking, and academic performance on the likelihood of majoring in PEMC in college. Results indicate that racial-ethnic and gender underrepresentation in STEM fields are interrelated and should be examined with attention to the intersecting factors influencing female and racial-ethnic minority adolescents' pathways towards careers in these fields. Among those who major in PEMC fields, females closely resemble males with respect to their subjective orientations. The effects of subjective orientations on females' chances of majoring in PEMC vary by their secondary school mathematics course completion levels. Females who take more mathematics courses are more likely to major in PEMC; however course taking alone does not attenuate gender disparities in declaring these majors. High mathematics ability (as measured by standardized test scores in 10th grade) appears to be positively associated with females' selection of social and behavioral and clinical and health science majors. This association is less robust (and slightly negative) for females in PEMC. While advanced course taking appears to assist females in selecting PEMC majors, females who enter these fields may not be as strong as those who select other, less male-dominated scientific fields.
Translational Abstract: In this study, researchers investigated the perceive competence, academic performance, and completed high school courses by men and women who majored in the physical, engineering, mathematics, and computer sciences (PEMC). Findings showed those who completed more mathematics courses in high school were more likely to enroll in PEMC majors; however, men still chose PEMC majors more often than women. In addition, women who majored in PEMC fields felt less competent than women who pursued less male-dominated fields such as behavioral, health, and social sciences.
Identifier: FSU_migr_edlp_faculty_publications-0001 (IID), 10.1037/a0027020 (DOI)
Keywords: gender, postsecondary education, social psychology, career, mathematics
Note: This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record, which can be found at DOI: 10.1037/a0027020. Copyright APA http://www.apa.org .
Citation: Perez-Felkner, L., McDonald, S.-K., Schneider, B., & Grogan, E. (2012). Female and Male Adolescents' Subjective Orientations to Mathematics and Their Influence on Postsecondary Majors. Developmental Psychology, 48(6), 1658–1673.
Subject(s): Educational leadership
Links: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0027020
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_edlp_faculty_publications-0001
Owner Institution: FSU
Is Part of Series: Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.
Is Part Of: Developmental Psychology.
Issue: 6, 48

Choose the citation style.
Perez-Felkner, L. (2012). Female and Male Adolescents' Subjective Orientations to Mathematics and the Influence of Those Orientations on Postsecondary Majors. Developmental Psychology. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0027020