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Role of Correspondence Bias in the Side-Effect Effect

Title: The Role of Correspondence Bias in the Side-Effect Effect.
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Name(s): Howey, Craig, author
Psychology
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: serial
Date Issued: 2012
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The side-effect effect refers to the asymmetric responses that are observed when participants are asked about the intentionality of an outcome seemingly dependent upon the participants' assessment of the moral status of the outcome. Research on correspondence bias suggests that participants may be making internal, dispositional judgments about the agent based on information provided in the vignette and that these judgments might influence their judgments of intentionality. Study 1 showed that participants were making dispositional attributions for the CEO in the original side-effect effect experiment and that these attributions were at least partially influencing judgments of intentionality. In Study 2, we tested the predictions of the Deep Self Model by altering the vignettes used in the original side-effect effect experiment to include descriptions of the agent as being either pro-environment or anti-environment. Results from this study establish the potential role of correspondence bias in the side-effect effect and indicated that, in some instances, the moral status of an agent influences participants' judgments of intentionality.
Identifier: FSU_migr_uhm-0081 (IID)
Keywords: side-effect effect, correspondence bias, intentionality
Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of Psychology in partial fulfillment of the requirements for graduation with Honors in the Major.
Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2012.
Date of Defense: April 9, 2012.
Subject(s): Psychology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_uhm-0081
Owner Institution: FSU
Is Part of Series: Honors Theses.

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Howey, C. (2012). The Role of Correspondence Bias in the Side-Effect Effect. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_uhm-0081