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"Don't Strip Tease for Anophlese"

Title: "Don't Strip Tease for Anophlese": A History of Malaria Protocols during World War II.
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Name(s): Wacks, Rachel Elise, author
Piehler, G. Kurt, professor directing thesis
Koslow, Jennifer L., committee member
Mizelle, Richard, committee member
Department of History, degree granting department
Florida State University, degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2013
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
Physical Form: online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: This study focuses on the American anti-malaria campaign beginning in 1939. Despite the seemingly endless scholarship on World War II in the past seventy years, little has been written on the malaria epidemic on Guadalcanal. Through extensive archival research, the breadth of the anti-malaria campaign throughout the Pacific is explored as a positive side effect of the malaria epidemic on Guadalcanal in 1942-1943. While most scholars of the Pacific war mention the devastating effects of malaria during the battle for Guadalcanal, few have examined the malaria protocols. Through intensified atabrine discipline, bed nets, mosquito repellant, and an intense cultural war against malaria, the United States military won the war against the anopheles mosquito. Moreover, research and development in the years leading up to war fundamentally changed the way large-scale scientific and medical research is conducted in the United States, including the establishment of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Identifier: FSU_migr_etd-7640 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of History in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts.
Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2013.
Date of Defense: March 29, 2013.
Keywords: Guadalcanal, Malaria, World War II
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: G. Kurt Piehler, Professor Directing Thesis; Jennifer L. Koslow, Committee Member; Richard Mizelle, Committee Member.
Subject(s): History
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-7640
Owner Institution: FSU