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Potential Reduction of Combined Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Zero-Valent Iron

Title: The Potential Reduction of Combined Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Zero-Valent Iron.
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Name(s): Pipkin, Leslie M., author
Clark, Clayton, II, professor directing thesis
Chen, Gang, committee member
Watts, Michael, committee member
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, degree granting department
Florida State University, degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2012
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The research is focused on the degradation of two endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) in zero-valent iron. The endocrine disrupting compounds bisphenol A (BPA) and 17b-estradiol (E2) are chemical compounds that have an adverse effect on the environment, humans, and wildlife. These two chemical constituents are being examined in this research because they are still being used today and continue to impact their surrounding environment. These chemicals are considered persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic to the environment. The research explores the technological use of zero-valent iron to degrade the chemical constituents in aqueous form. The study conducted laboratory batch experiments to compare the efficiency of using zero-valent iron in a reducing environment to remediate endocrine disrupting compounds in groundwater. The experimentations looked at varying ratios of volume of solution to mass of zero-valent iron. Furthermore, this study compared the reactions of the chemical constituent in question by varying the aqueous solution to entail the combined constituents (BPA and E2) to separate solutions to determine the chemical degradation model and rates over a period of a week. During the experiments held out with the combined concentration of BPA and E2, both BPA and E2 followed a power-law model. Degradation rates increased as the varying volume to mass ratio decreased. The higher degradation rates were found with a volume to mass solution at 2:1 which gave the chemicals the shortest half-lives. BPA's lowest calculated half-life was approximately 12 days. E2's lowest calculated half-life was approximately 1 day. The degradation rates varied for each EDC when the compounds were treated separately in an aqueous solution over a 24-hour period. The set of experimentations showed that the higher degradation rates occurred with a volume to mass ratio of 2:1. BPA followed the first-order degradation model and showed a reduction of approximately 93% with a calculated half-life of 24 days. E2 followed a pseudo first-order degradation model and showed a reduction of approximately 92% during a 24-hour period with a calculated half-life of 2.655 hours. The research shows that the chemicals are competing for the surface area of the iron when in combined solutions. The experimentations in separate solutions show that E2 is a limiting factor in the ZVI. The research determined that degradation of bisphenol A and 17b-estradiol will occur in an aqueous solution in zero-valent iron.
Identifier: FSU_migr_etd-5112 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Thesis submitted to the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science.
Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2012.
Date of Defense: March 16, 2012.
Keywords: 17b-estradiol, bisphenol A, endocrine disrupting compounds, groundwater treatment, zero-valent iron
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Clayton Clark, II, Professor Directing Thesis; Gang Chen, Committee Member; Michael Watts, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Civil engineering
Environmental engineering
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-5112
Owner Institution: FSU

Choose the citation style.
Pipkin, L. M. (2012). The Potential Reduction of Combined Endocrine Disrupting Compounds in Zero-Valent Iron. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-5112