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College and Character

Title: College and Character: A Study of the Differences in Character Values and Character Education Practices Between American Four-Year Private Faith-Based and Private Nonsectarian Colleges and Universities.
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Name(s): Chen, Pu-Shih Daniel, author
Dalton, Jon C., professor directing dissertation
Kamata, Akihito, outside committee member
Schwartz, Robert A., committee member
Russell, Terrence, committee member
Gaston-Gayles, Joy, committee member
Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, degree granting department
Florida State University, degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2005
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purposes of this study were to operationally define the construct, college student character development, to develop an instrument to measure the types of efforts of colleges and universities in developing student character, to estimate the instrument's reliability and validity, and to compare the differences in student character development efforts between American private four-year faith-based and private nonsectarian colleges and universities as perceived by chief student affairs officers. A definition and study of student character development, a measurement of collegiate efforts in developing student character, and a comprehensive review of literature most closely related to definitions of character and character education practices on college campuses were undertaken and a Character Education Values and Practices Inventory (CEVPI) was developed. The results of this study indicate that good character has three aspects, namely affective, cognitive, and behavioral. The results of this study also showed private faith-based colleges and universities are more likely to promote affective and behavioral aspects of good character than private nonsectarian colleges and universities. However, a more thorough analysis found that the two types of colleges and universities shared a lot of similarities in terms of the character values they would like to promote in student character development. On the other hand, private faith-based and private nonsectarian colleges and universities utilized very different character education strategies in promoting student character development. Private faith-based colleges and universities were also more likely to utilize academic, spiritual/religious, and administrative strategies to promote student character development, compared to private nonsectarian colleges and universities.
Identifier: FSU_migr_etd-3862 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.
Degree Awarded: Fall Semester, 2005.
Date of Defense: November 14, 2005.
Keywords: Spiritual Development, Character Development, College Student, Value Education, Higher Education, Student Development, Moral Development
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Jon C. Dalton, Professor Directing Dissertation; Akihito Kamata, Outside Committee Member; Robert A. Schwartz, Committee Member; Terrence Russell, Committee Member; Joy Gaston-Gayles, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Education
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3862
Owner Institution: FSU

Choose the citation style.
Chen, P. -S. D. (2005). College and Character: A Study of the Differences in Character Values and Character Education Practices Between American Four-Year Private Faith-Based and Private Nonsectarian Colleges and Universities. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3862