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Anticipatory Socialization and University Retention

Title: Anticipatory Socialization and University Retention: An Analysis of the Effect of Enrollment at a Faith-Based Secondary School on the Progression of Students Through a Faith-Based University.
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Name(s): Latham, Sarah C., author
deHaven-Smith, Lance, professor directing dissertation
Herrington, Carolyn, outside committee member
Berry, Frances, committee member
Feiock, Richard, committee member
School of Public Administration and Policy, degree granting department
Florida State University, degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2004
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The retention and graduation of students is at the core of postsecondary education. This topic becomes increasingly relevant as tight budgets force state legislatures to seek increased accountability, and soaring tuition costs force students and parents to demand results for their investment. Numerous studies have been done exploring progression and the factors affecting it. However, few have framed the pursuit of a baccalaureate degree using the concept of anticipatory socialization. This study seeks to fill that void and link three fields of study: Organizational Theory, Anticipatory Socialization Theory, and Student Progression Research. A longitudinal cohort analysis was performed to assess the role of anticipatory socialization in increasing the likelihood of attainment of a baccalaureate degree. The anticipatory socialization mode of focus was attendance at a secondary faith-based institution as a socialization mechanism preparing students for attendance at a faith-based university. The hypothesis underlying the analysis suggested that students who are already socialized within a faith-based learning institution would exhibit higher graduation rates from a faith-based university, than students who graduated from non faith-based secondary institutions. Furthermore, using Tinto's Stages of college student progression, it was argued that attrition rates would be higher for non-faith-based high school graduates during the freshmen year, when integration occurs. Finally, the subsequent enrollment of drop-out was examined in order to determine the types of institutions they subsequently transferred to. Logistic regression models confirmed the effect of faith-based secondary school enrollment and found that the stage of exit was different based on high school type. The significant factors affecting subsequent enrollment still require further research.
Identifier: FSU_migr_etd-3263 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Askew School of Public Administration and Policy in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.
Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2004.
Date of Defense: March 15, 2004.
Keywords: Organizational Studies, Anticipatory Socialization, Education, Retention
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Lance deHaven-Smith, Professor Directing Dissertation; Carolyn Herrington, Outside Committee Member; Frances Berry, Committee Member; Richard Feiock, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Public policy
Public administration
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3263
Owner Institution: FSU

Choose the citation style.
Latham, S. C. (2004). Anticipatory Socialization and University Retention: An Analysis of the Effect of Enrollment at a Faith-Based Secondary School on the Progression of Students Through a Faith-Based University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-3263