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Comparison of Effects Between Post Exercise Resting Metabolic Rate after Thirty Minutes of Intermittent Treadmill and Resistance Exercise

Title: A Comparison of Effects Between Post Exercise Resting Metabolic Rate after Thirty Minutes of Intermittent Treadmill and Resistance Exercise.
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Name(s): Meuret, Julie, author
Panton, Lynn, professor directing thesis
Figueroa, Arturo, committee member
Mills, Steve, committee member
Department of Nutrition, Food, and Exercise Science, degree granting department
Florida State University, degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2007
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: PURPOSE: The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the acute effects of resistance exercise (RE) and intermittent anaerobic treadmill (IT) exercise matched for relative exercise intensity and duration on 14 hour post-exercise metabolic rate (MR) and 24 hour post-exercise resting metabolic rate (RMR) in healthy females. METHODS: Seven aerobically (>46 ml/kg/min) and resistance trained female college students, 18-30 yrs, were recruited. Subjects completed a running maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) test, and one repetition maximal (1RM) tests for 5 resistance exercises. These tests were conducted at least 7 days prior to the exercise protocols. Subjects slept overnight in the laboratory for two consecutive nights during their early follicular menstrual phase. Evening and morning metabolic measurements were taken (9:30 p.m and 6:30 a.m) by indirect calorimetry. The subjects underwent one control night and then completed one exercise bout following the control morning RMR. Following the exercise protocol MR and RMR were measured again at 14 and 24 hours respectively. The subjects returned during a following menstrual cycle to complete the second exercise protocol. The two exercise protocols that were randomly assigned were RE and IT. Exercise duration (30 min), interval:recovery time (30 sec:60sec) was constant between the two protocols. The intensity for the IT was > 90% VO2max and the intensity of RE was 80% of 1RM lifts. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to determine significance among the three conditions (control, RE, IT) for 14 hour MR and 24 hour RMR. Significance was accepted at p≤0.05. RESULTS: Kilocalories expended and heart rate during IT were significantly higher (298 ± 49 kcals; 169 ± 11 bpm) than RE (129 ± 29 kcals; 134 ± 18 bpm). At 14 hours post-exercise MR was significantly different among the three conditions (F (1.1,6.6)= 6.03; p≤0.05, effect size (ES)=0.50). MR was 8.8 and 11.8% higher for the IT and RE, respectively compared to control conditions. At 24 hours post-exercise RMR was not significantly different among the three conditions (F(2,12)= 2.70; p>0.05, ES=.31). CONCLUSION: Both protocols demonstrated that 30 minutes of intermittent-high intensity exercise can increase energy expenditure for up to 14 hours after exercise. This may have important implications for weight loss programs.46 ml/kg/min) and resistance trained female college students, 18-30 yrs, were recruited. Subjects completed a running maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) test, and one repetition maximal (1RM) tests for 5 resistance exercises. These tests were conducted at least 7 days prior to the exercise protocols. Subjects slept overnight in the laboratory for two consecutive nights during their early follicular menstrual phase. Evening and morning metabolic measurements were taken (9:30 p.m and 6:30 a.m) by indirect calorimetry. The subjects underwent one control night and then completed one exercise bout following the control morning RMR. Following the exercise protocol MR and RMR were measured again at 14 and 24 hours respectively. The subjects returned during a following menstrual cycle to complete the second exercise protocol. The two exercise protocols that were randomly assigned were RE and IT. Exercise duration (30 min), interval:recovery time (30 sec:60sec) was constant between the two protocols. The intensity for the IT was > 90% VO2max and the intensity of RE was 80% of 1RM lifts. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to determine significance among the three conditions (control, RE, IT) for 14 hour MR and 24 hour RMR. Significance was accepted at p≤0.05. RESULTS: Kilocalories expended and heart rate during IT were significantly higher (298 ± 49 kcals; 169 ± 11 bpm) than RE (129 ± 29 kcals; 134 ± 18 bpm). At 14 hours post-exercise MR was significantly different among the three conditions (F (1.1,6.6)= 6.03; p≤0.05, effect size (ES)=0.50). MR was 8.8 and 11.8% higher for the IT and RE, respectively compared to control conditions. At 24 hours post-exercise RMR was not significantly different among the three conditions (F(2,12)= 2.70; p>0.05, ES=.31). CONCLUSION: Both protocols demonstrated that 30 minutes of intermittent-high intensity exercise can increase energy expenditure for up to 14 hours after exercise. This may have important implications for weight loss programs. 90% VO2max and the intensity of RE was 80% of 1RM lifts. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to determine significance among the three conditions (control, RE, IT) for 14 hour MR and 24 hour RMR. Significance was accepted at p≤0.05. RESULTS: Kilocalories expended and heart rate during IT were significantly higher (298 ± 49 kcals; 169 ± 11 bpm) than RE (129 ± 29 kcals; 134 ± 18 bpm). At 14 hours post-exercise MR was significantly different among the three conditions (F (1.1,6.6)= 6.03; p≤0.05, effect size (ES)=0.50). MR was 8.8 and 11.8% higher for the IT and RE, respectively compared to control conditions. At 24 hours post-exercise RMR was not significantly different among the three conditions (F(2,12)= 2.70; p>0.05, ES=.31). CONCLUSION: Both protocols demonstrated that 30 minutes of intermittent-high intensity exercise can increase energy expenditure for up to 14 hours after exercise. This may have important implications for weight loss programs.0.05, ES=.31). CONCLUSION: Both protocols demonstrated that 30 minutes of intermittent-high intensity exercise can increase energy expenditure for up to 14 hours after exercise. This may have important implications for weight loss programs.
Identifier: FSU_migr_etd-2461 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Thesis Submitted to the Department of Nutrition, Food & Exercise Sciences in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Masters of Science.
Degree Awarded: Summer Semester, 2007.
Date of Defense: July 2, 2007.
Keywords: Interval Exercise RMR, EPOC, Weight Loss, Resistance Exercise, Women
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory Committee: Lynn Panton, Professor Directing Thesis; Arturo Figueroa, Committee Member; Steve Mills, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Food
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-2461
Owner Institution: FSU

Choose the citation style.
Meuret, J. (2007). A Comparison of Effects Between Post Exercise Resting Metabolic Rate after Thirty Minutes of Intermittent Treadmill and Resistance Exercise. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-2461