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Effect of Assigned Achievement Goals, Self-Monitoring, Interest in the Subject Matter, and Goal Orientations on Students' Computer Skill Achievement, Use of Learning Strategies, and Computer Self-Efficacy Beliefs

Title: The Effect of Assigned Achievement Goals, Self-Monitoring, Interest in the Subject Matter, and Goal Orientations on Students' Computer Skill Achievement, Use of Learning Strategies, and Computer Self-Efficacy Beliefs.
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Name(s): Al-Hassan, Riyadh, author
Reiser, Robert, professor directing dissertation
Charness, Neil, outside committee member
Kamata, Akihito, committee member
Baylor, Amy, committee member
Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems, degree granting department
Florida State University, degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Text
Issuance: monographic
Date Issued: 2004
Publisher: Florida State University
Place of Publication: Tallahassee, Florida
Physical Form: computer
online resource
Extent: 1 online resource
Language(s): English
Abstract/Description: The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of two self-regulated learning strategies, assigning achievement goals to students (process or outcome) and self-monitoring of learning, on students' computer skill achievement and self-efficacy beliefs. Moreover, the study sought to identify the effect of students' initial goal orientations and interest in learning on their achievement, self-efficacy, and use of learning strategies. Participants in this study were 96 college students enrolled in four sections of an introductory course in educational technology. Students' ages ranged between 18 and 20, and majority of the students were females. Students' initial goal orientations, self-efficacy beliefs, their use of learning strategies, and interest in the subject matter were examined using the relevant sub-scales from the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Students' skills in writing simple and complex search statements for Internet search engines were measured using a 12-item posttest. Multiple regression analysis was used to test the main and interaction effects of the independent variables on the study's dependent measures. Three regression models, one for each dependent variable, were computed. Results of the study partly supported the hypotheses on the positive effect of goals and self-monitoring on the dependent variables of the study. Goals and self-monitoring had appositive effect on student's computer skill achievement on complex posttest items. However, the effect of goals and self-monitoring on computer self-efficacy and the use of learning strategies was not consistent with the hypothesized effect. Moreover, the hypotheses concerning the positive effect of interest and goal orientations on the dependent measures were not fully supported. Students' interest had a positive effect on students' computer self-efficacy and use of learning strategies, but its effect on complex computer skill achievement was not significant. Goal orientations did not have a significant effect on any of the dependent variables. Limitations concerning the methodology and results of the study and implications of this study for learning and instruction were discussed and suggestions for future research on computer skill learning, self-regulating learning strategies, and motivational variables were provided.
Identifier: FSU_migr_etd-0148 (IID)
Submitted Note: A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Psychology and Learning Systems in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.
Degree Awarded: Degree Awarded: Spring Semester, 2004.
Date of Defense: Date of Defense: December 4, 2003.
Keywords: Instructional Systems Design, Self-Efficacy, Educational Technology, Curriculum and Instruction, Computer Education
Bibliography Note: Includes bibliographical references.
Advisory committee: Robert Reiser, Professor Directing Dissertation; Neil Charness, Outside Committee Member; Akihito Kamata, Committee Member; Amy Baylor, Committee Member.
Subject(s): Psychology
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0148
Owner Institution: FSU

Choose the citation style.
Al-Hassan, R. (2004). The Effect of Assigned Achievement Goals, Self-Monitoring, Interest in the Subject Matter, and Goal Orientations on Students' Computer Skill Achievement, Use of Learning Strategies, and Computer Self-Efficacy Beliefs. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0148